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Datacenter Robbed for the Fourth Time in Two Years 437

Posted by Zonk
from the that's-quite-a-router-failure dept.
mariushm writes "According to the Register, the Chicago-based colocation datacenter C I Host was attacked by armed intruders recently, making it the the fourth time in two years that armed thugs have made off with data. According to a letter C I Host officials sent customers, 'At least two masked intruders entered the suite after cutting into the reinforced walls with a power saw ... During the robbery, C I Host's night manager was repeatedly tazered and struck with a blunt instrument. After violently attacking the manager, the intruders stole equipment belonging to C I Host and its customers.' Aggravating the situation, C I Host representatives took several days to admit the most recent breach, according to several customers who said they lost equipment, all the while reporting the problems as 'router failures'."
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Datacenter Robbed for the Fourth Time in Two Years

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  • by Z00L00K (682162) on Saturday November 03, 2007 @06:40PM (#21226881) Homepage
    is that it was reported as "Router Failures" instead of the real cause.

    And if they have been robbed before - why not increase the security? Four times? - That's some kind of record. Maybe it's time to check if the localization of the whole thing is incorrect and move it to a better location where it's less likely to suffer from this kind of incident?

    • by calebt3 (1098475)
      I can understand their reluctance to move. That can't be cheap. But you're right that they should do something about *real* security. Maybe it's an inside job?
      • I couldn't make this stuff up. They're advertising for a security guard [careerbuilder.com],

        "We are seeking motivated individuals" ... translation: work cheap.

        "Prior security experience preferred." ... translation: not really a requirement, but if we can get it at no extra cost ...

        "Some College is also preferred." ... if you managed to drop out of college instead of high school, you're more "presentable" to our insurers, who are now royally pissed at us ...

        ... and if you scroll down to the bottom of the page:

        "Armed Hand-gun license/permit and ability to supply own weapon a Huge Plus! : translation: "we're cheap! You're desperate AND stupid! Let's talk!"

        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by YoungHack (36385)
          > "Armed Hand-gun license/permit and ability to supply own weapon a Huge Plus! : translation: "we're cheap! You're desperate AND stupid! Let's talk!"

          That's not the way I would translate that. Now if they had a policy of forbidding handguns to employees with a concealed weapon permit I would find that stupid.

          If the job entails being the victim of attacks with lethal force (and being repeated tasered and beaten is exactly that) then personally I think it's very rational to prefer an employee that has the
            1. The police think it was an inside job
            2. The employee wasn't on the premises when the door lock was jimmied open (no, they didn't "cut through a reinforced wall" - they just forced a door open according to the police report and people who went to visit the site the next day to check on their equipment)
            3. Fat chance getting a concealed carry permit in Chicago.

              Illinois is one of the few states that has no provision for the concealed carry of firearms by citizens. Open carry is also illegal, except when hunting. When a firearm is being transported, it must be unloaded and enclosed in a case.
              Only cops and military get CCW permits.

            CI Host doesn't want to spend the money on secure facilities, instead replacing that with a rent-a-dumb-warm-body. Dumb, because taking this job w/o a permit is just begging to be thrown in jail, and if you have the permit, you can sure as heck do better than CI Host.

    • by Brian Gordon (987471) on Saturday November 03, 2007 @06:49PM (#21226969)
      I agree, the routers [wikipedia.org] _didn't_ fail, that's how the thieves got in in the first place.
    • by Z00L00K (682162) on Saturday November 03, 2007 @07:00PM (#21227039) Homepage

      "at least two masked intruders entered the suite after cutting into the reinforced walls with a power saw,"
      In what way was that wall reinforced? Dual layer of sheetrock? If it was sufficiently reinforced it would have delayed the intruders long enough for the police to get there (unless the police chose to not respond). If I was insuring that company I would drop the insurance dead by now due to lack of sufficient protective measures. If the measures were approved by the insurance company I would recommend all other clients to change insurance company.

      Anyway - maybe it's time to weave in copper mesh into the T-shirt of all datacenter employees to protect against tazers.

      And notice from a comment to the article that any so called man trap doesn't exist - and the security seems to have been far too relaxed. Just a fine example of how not to do things. A good datacenter is located where almost nobody knows where it is - preferably underground in a nondescript location in the countryside. A set of optical fibers will take care of all the traffic. And very few persons shall have physical access to the hardware. Think about how the military handles their datacenters.

      • I'm not too sure what measures are realistic for a datacenter when the robbers are armed and carry the equipment they require to cut through walls.
      • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday November 03, 2007 @07:35PM (#21227283)
        I actually had a server hosted in that very Chicago facility. (I actually got referred to it by clicking a "$75 a month colocation" advertisement link on slashdot)

        The datacenter in question is in a terrible neighborhood, and I can't see anyone bothering a truck there in the dead of night.

        There was no man trap, and no security of any sort, just a tech guy who let me in and opened the glass datacenter door for me.

        I doubt they have a panic button of any sort either.

        You disable the one guy on call and there would be no police coming, period.
        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by cyphercell (843398)
          Time to move, I actually live in a rural area, but due to location there was a particular bank that could not be defended, robbed eight times in two years, they finally closed the thing, and voila no more bank robberies in town. Once these people figure something out that works they will become accustomed to more income, they will come back until they get caught, or the easy pickings disappear.
    • by grommit (97148) on Saturday November 03, 2007 @07:24PM (#21227201)
      In that forum, it was posted that the hosting provider had posted a job application for somebody willing or able to carry a gun. They were hiring at minimum wage or just above minimum wage if you had experience with guns.

      So, they're looking to hire people that carry guns that are willing to accept a job at minimum wage. That should tell you something right there.
      • by tylernt (581794) on Saturday November 03, 2007 @08:28PM (#21227629)

        somebody willing or able to carry a gun.
        Illinois is one of the most anti-gun states, and Chicago has even more strict rules on top of that. It's almost as bad as Britain. About the only way you're going to have an armed security guard in Chicago is if he's actually a sworn law enforcement officer or you have *really* tight political connections to those in power.

        In a more, uh... "free" state, yes, armed security is a realistic proposition. However such states usually have less violent crime too, so you don't need them as much.
    • by hpavc (129350)
      My money is on inside job, if evidence was destroyed by them to cover up this guy and the customers has some serious bank coming.
    • by nuzak (959558) on Saturday November 03, 2007 @09:38PM (#21227983) Journal
      It couldn't have happened to a better bunch of scumbags. [slashdot.org] In fact I wouldn't be surprised at all if they robbed the datacenter themselves to destroy evidence or just for insurance fraud.
  • Obligatory... (Score:4, Interesting)

    by mosel-saar-ruwer (732341) on Saturday November 03, 2007 @06:43PM (#21226905)

    Don't tase me, bro!

    Seriously, though, this sounds like something out of a really bad Hollywood B-Movie.

    I didn't know you could do stuff like this in real life.

    • Re:Obligatory... (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Brian Gordon (987471) on Saturday November 03, 2007 @06:47PM (#21226945)
      No, it sounds like something out of a ridiculously popular A-movie that makes 100s of millions of dollars. You underestimate the american public's willingness to watch total crap.
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        Well, if it really happens maybe those movies aren't quite as silly as you thought.

        I mean, yeah, they're stupid ... but it's harder to claim they're unrealistic now.

  • inside job (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday November 03, 2007 @06:45PM (#21226919)
    smells like an inside job / insurance scam 1st would be an anomaly , 4th time i would be looking very hard at the companies and its staffs finances
    • I agree that it is probably the same guys doing it over and over again. The relatively advanced method of attack also implies something over and above the crackhead level of intelligence. There are inside jobs and inside jobs though. It could just as be a relative of boyfriend or even friend of a friend or relative.

      All they need is the knowledge of what is inside combined with some knowledge of the defense systems. You can get that for a couple of beers if you ask the right person in the right way.
    • by Bert64 (520050)
      Well, the companies finances won't be doing as well now that news of 4 seperate break-ins has gone public...
      Also, if thieves found it easy the first time and didn't see any significant improvements being made it makes sense from their perspective to go back. They already know the layout of the place.
    • Great intuition :) In the forum thread, linked from the story, they mention it seems like an inside job multiple times, including once where they claim the detective on the case stated it as well. Are there other data centers in Chicago that get robbed? I have never heard of this kind of thing happening before. I work for an ISP / data center in the upper midwest (not in Chicago or even IL).
    • Re:inside job (Score:5, Interesting)

      by sir_montag (937262) <sir.montag@NOspAM.gmail.com> on Saturday November 03, 2007 @08:16PM (#21227545) Homepage Journal
      It most likely was an inside job. A little while back, I was working for a company that was installing some VoIP phones for CI Host and the list of employee phone numbers kept changing from visit to visit - "Oh that guy? No, he doesn't work here any more."

      A friend of mine that used to work there said that "being in jail was a fairly common excuse for missing work there". The employees seemed to hate working there, to put it mildly.

      And the cokehead that owned the company loved to fire employees at a moment's notice, left and right. I highly doubt there's any employee loyalty there.

      So in short, you've got highly unhappy employees that get fired at an amazing rate, with some seriously negative employee loyalty and they're surprised when stuff gets stolen?
  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday November 03, 2007 @06:45PM (#21226923)
    It turns out the router was unable to route wherever the thieves had taken it.
  • by flyingfsck (986395) on Saturday November 03, 2007 @06:46PM (#21226929)
    Hmm, I'm not using them anymore. They had regular power failures in Dallas - claiming 'UPS maintenance'. My home DSL setup is more reliable than their data centre.
    • by MBCook (132727) <foobarsoft@foobarsoft.com> on Saturday November 03, 2007 @06:59PM (#21227037) Homepage

      Ditto. I switched off them a year and a half or two ago. I don't remember what the final rub was, I think it was reliability (website or email going up or down seemingly randomly?). I've been on Dreamhost since, and been pretty happy (note: referral link at the bottom of my website).

      I agree with the other posters. They lied. They obviously have no security (or they are facing an inside job). Four robberies in two years?

      I'd switch off 'em real fast if I heard this news. I like Dreamhost but if I heard this about them I'd probably switch off them fast too. How can I trust a hosting company that can't even secure their own premises?

      • Uhh just fyi, Dreamhost isnt a datacenter.
        • by MBCook (132727)
          If they were and I heard this, I would almost certainly leave them. That was my point.
  • Still in business? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Enderandrew (866215) <enderandrew&gmail,com> on Saturday November 03, 2007 @06:48PM (#21226963) Homepage Journal
    After the first robbery, I'd seriously consider moving my data. If my data is still there after the second robbery, I feel stupid. If my data is still there after the third robbery, I should lose my job. If my data is still there after the fourth robbery, I need to promoted to executive management.

    The entire purpose of off-site storage is disaster recovery, and prevention of major disasters like this. Why are these guys still in business?
  • In the brake room watching tv / playing games?

    Doing the same thing in the big room with all of the tv screens?
  • I'm a Dreamhost customer, and the past couple years they've had a few issues, and some people have taken it as an opportunity to bash the hell out of them. Having used many hosts over the years myself and for customers, I've found them to be on par with, if not a little above many hosts. The biggest difference is DH is HONEST about their issues, on their status blog. When they fuck up, they say so. To me, that's more valuable than a host that makes it self look like it's more stable by lying, such as the pa
    • by Bodrius (191265)
      True, honesty has as much, if not more, value as measured reliability.

      Haven't used DH, but from your description it'll go into my list of potential hosting providers now for whenever I need one.
      One of my last bad experiences with hosting was with actadivina - they just crashed in silence, and customers were left to speculate what happened to their site and their data, etc.
      At least for me (it was a hobby site), the lack of follow up was the worse part. Customers found their host provider went out of business
  • by hcdejong (561314) <hobbes@NOSPAM.xmsnet.nl> on Saturday November 03, 2007 @06:51PM (#21226993)
    Suddenly, buying an old army bunker complex to house your datacenter doesn't seem that excessive.
  • Fool me once.... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by SirLurksAlot (1169039) on Saturday November 03, 2007 @06:53PM (#21227013)
    shame on you. Fool me four or more times shame on me!
  • Well..if they had said "route failure" that would of been accurate since technically the route HAS changed for those servers......
  • That was a truly "professional" operation. It's happened four times. They're specifically targeting this datacenter, and management's reaction is anomalous. If I were a police investigator, I'd start probing. Maybe there's nothing to find, but I'd bet money that there is.

    Kind of reminds me of that pizza bomber a couple of years ago.
    • by Bert64 (520050)
      But consider, if you were a thief and you robbed a datacenter... And the reaction to your robbery was very weak, no improved security etc...
      Would you target them again, knowing that their security was still weak and knowing the layout of the building and their security protocols etc? If i was these thieves, i'd keep hitting the same place over and over so long as they weren't doing anything significant about it. 4 times in 2 years is quite a reasonable rate, spaced far enough apart that it's not worth it fo
      • by xenocide2 (231786)
        After the second time, who would insure them without positive proof of countermeasures? It almost has to be fraud.
  • by dgatwood (11270) on Saturday November 03, 2007 @07:00PM (#21227047) Journal

    Well, if they actually care enough to try to prevent these attacks, I can see three solutions, any of which should be highly effective:

    Deadly force. If you are being robbed at gunpoint on a regular basis, your employees can legitimately say that they fear for their lives, and thus, purchasing of firearms is legally and morally justifiable. Perhaps a couple of guards posted at the entrance with semiautomatic rifles, plus three or four in appropriately concealed locations within the facility (or more if the facility is large enough). Criminals (armed or not) will think twice before attacking.

    Electrical interference. Hook a 230 kV transmission line directly to the rebar in the walls. Anyone who tries to cut their way in will likely spontaneously combust, or at the very least, be knocked several meters. Such an attack won't happen twice.

    Oxygen deprivation. You probably already have halon fire extinguishers. Assign everyone emergency oxygen masks and a red button remote. In the event of an attack, press the red button and put on your oxygen mask. Assuming you dump enough halon, it will bond with all the free oxygen in the room, incapacitating or killing the intruders in seconds. Assuming they survive, they should still be unconscious when the police arrive to arrest them.

    • by Tim C (15259) on Saturday November 03, 2007 @07:07PM (#21227081)
      Armed guards are probably legal, and using the fire suppression system you could probably get away with if you didn't specifically give orders to use it as a weapon, but the electrical booby trap is almost certainly illegal. If nothing else it almost certainly contravenes local health and safety laws.
      • Heh, not to mention blacking out half the city once it faults.

        230kV at 100A comes out to, what, about 10MW?
        • Before someone catches my bad math, that's closer to 23MW.

          Sigh. It's a Saturday, can you tell?

          Either way, a fault would be spectacular.
    • A 230kV transmission line would probably blow holes in the concrete and arc to any metal in the building. You couldn't get within 10 feet of the wall without the electrical fields being strong enough to make your skin tingle...

      Not to mention once it faults the building would probably explode.

      What I'd recommend instead would be a fine mesh of metal connected to an *ungrounded* 480V feeder line.
    • by Z00L00K (682162) on Saturday November 03, 2007 @07:19PM (#21227165) Homepage

      Deadly force. If you are being robbed at gunpoint on a regular basis, your employees can legitimately say that they fear for their lives, and thus, purchasing of firearms is legally and morally justifiable. Perhaps a couple of guards posted at the entrance with semiautomatic rifles, plus three or four in appropriately concealed locations within the facility (or more if the facility is large enough). Criminals (armed or not) will think twice before attacking.

      If the criminals REALLY want to get in it's not a good idea to arm the employees anyway. Specially assigned guards maybe, but the employees of a data center - no... Just imagine if someone has a bad day... Shooting out at the boss, servers and everyone else in sight. Or if the criminals know about it they will shoot first and check later.

      Electrical interference. Hook a 230 kV transmission line directly to the rebar in the walls. Anyone who tries to cut their way in will likely spontaneously combust, or at the very least, be knocked several meters. Such an attack won't happen twice.

      Assuming that it's concrete walls... But it's a good idea until the maintenance guy comes in to drill a new hole for a cable.

      Oxygen deprivation. You probably already have halon fire extinguishers. Assign everyone emergency oxygen masks and a red button remote. In the event of an attack, press the red button and put on your oxygen mask. Assuming you dump enough halon, it will bond with all the free oxygen in the room, incapacitating or killing the intruders in seconds. Assuming they survive, they should still be unconscious when the police arrive to arrest them.

      Halon use is outlawed, at least in some countries since it has a bad effect on the ozone layer. Carbon Dioxide is almost as good, and has the same effect. Of course - you may use any non-oxidizing gas like pure nitrogen or helium instead. As long as it lowers the oxygen level in the compartment. A much more evil way is to use carbon monoxide instead of carbon dioxide. In this case the survivability is even lower, but if it's released by accident it will be much more nasty.

      But it seems that the datacenter hasn't taken action as it should and moved the servers to a different more covert location. The daily operation can remain at the same location, but since the servers aren't there anymore the criminals will have to leave empty-handed. This requires that the persons running the night-shift doesn't know about the real location of the servers unless they also are relocated.

      • Halon use is outlawed, at least in some countries since it has a bad effect on the ozone layer. Carbon Dioxide is almost as good, and has the same effect.

        Hmm, the last company I worked at had a halon system in the data storage/backup room for fire protection. This was in Florida about 2 years ago. Obviously no federal law outlawing it in the US.
        • by AceCaseOR (594637)

          Hmm, the last company I worked at had a halon system in the data storage/backup room for fire protection. This was in Florida about 2 years ago. Obviously no federal law outlawing it in the US.

          IANAL, but it may be illegal to install new Halon systems. There may be a grandfather clause for existing Halon systems.

          Plus (IIRC) Halon isn't actually lethal, dispite what you read in BOFH, it merely makes you dizzy and light-headed - which still isn't necessarily a bad thing, as it might help partially incapicate the thieves until they are apprehended (at which point the adrenaline may kick in, partially counter-acting the effects of the Halon.

    • by flynns (639641)
      This is Chicago. They don't believe in guns, on the same scale that DC and NYC don't.
    • If I were a thief in that case, I'd set off the Halon and wear an oxygen mask myself.
    • by LM741N (258038)
      Uh, concrete conducts electricity. Its a hydrate (ie water). You take the water out and you are left with white dust. Same for plaster and mortar.
    • Actually, 220 Volt is plenty, and when the rebar gets cut, you're quite likely to notice it popping a fuse. And you don't have to risk the lives of your electricians running 230 kV through poorly electrically isolated rebar.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday November 03, 2007 @07:06PM (#21227077)
    I've used them for years, and was an avid supporter of CI Host even while they were enduring constant negative publicity.. I was initially a client of their shared hosting, then upgraded to a dedicated hosting package, and never had an issue aside from the typical short downtime every now and then.. nothing crazy.. so a startup I was working with put a colocated server with them earlier this year and in around 6 months we endure an outage for numerous days, numerous BS excuses, then one day "Oh yeah by the way your server was actually stolen, and good luck finding the real thieves!" So now we come to find that this has happened 3-4 times in the past 2 years, the detective (and even a worker there I talked with) told me they believed it was an inside job. Obviously I am cancelling all of my accounts and taking my business elsewhere. I will proudly do my best to spread the word and tell EVERYONE I know to NEVER use CI Host for *ANYTHING*
  • by rueger (210566) on Saturday November 03, 2007 @07:12PM (#21227123) Homepage
    'At least two masked intruders entered the suite after cutting into the reinforced walls with a power saw ... During the robbery, C I Host's night manager was repeatedly tazered and struck with a blunt instrument.

    Good on them for hiring the disabled! Although perhaps the night manager position is not one suited to someone so deaf that they can't hear a Sawz-All cutting though the wall...
  • At first, I thought WTF???? Why would someone break into a data center.

    Then, I thought about it, and being that a datacenter has more supposedly valuable stuff that you can pick up and leave with _and_ you have an easy time to sell it, well, I'm only surprised that this is not a daily occurrence.

    In the "information age", what is more valuable than information? And the price/pound or volume makes information orders of magnitude more valuable than gold, art or even money itself.

    It almost makes sense when y
    • by Alphager (957739)
      You are right, datacenters are a prime target for criminals. That is why good datacenters have military-grade security. The last data-center i worked for had tripple barbed fences(NATO-standard compliant)and reinforced concrete blocks to prevent ramming with explosive-filled trucks. The inner layout of the datacenter placed the offices at the outside walls of the building and the machines at the center core of the building. It would have taken several men with heavy machinery to get into the center, and t
  • by jimijon (608416) on Saturday November 03, 2007 @07:13PM (#21227131) Homepage
    Last November I had ALL my servers stolen there. Now over all the years I have had servers I have backed up data, upgraded servers, clean installed servers, etc., then that fateful day in November after being stonewalled for days I finally went over to the data center only to find ALL my servers stolen. All my data. Yea I had some offsite backups, etc, but .... stolen. I guess they thieves really liked my XServes. They were nice and shiny in a sea of beige and black. Anyway, they gave me some free hosting after that, so, I said ok.. big mistake... about a month ago two of my three servers were stolen. Thankfully I had them a bit spread at the datacenter. Well, can I sue? What can I do now? Same bs, promising me servers and nothing. Last year I lost a lot of clients,,, granted all but two were mostly very small time hosting accounts. This time I now lost a big client even though I got them back up and running asap... get a server, install configure, read the files from the backup server, etc. Anyway it was truly the worst feeling I have had in many a year. It is definitely bs. And what do the Chicago PD do? Well your guess is as good as mine.. maybe they are out ticketing the thieves truck as their meter runs out. Any lawyers out there that can help?
    • by Z00L00K (682162)

      The question here is if there was a change in security protocol after the first incident. If not - then you should have pulled out and changed to another datacenter, or even considered hosting it yourself.

      The problem that the Police has is that as long as it's property lost and no person was physically assaulted they tend to decrease the priority of the case rather quickly. Unless it's the RIAA, MPAA or similar organization that claims loss of billions in intellectual property. A stolen computer is the

      • by AceCaseOR (594637)
        Well, someone was physically assaulted this time (according to TFA), so hopefully this will up the priority with the Chicago PD.
  • I'll bet a big, multi-port Cicso router might be a better target, pound-for-pound, than a dell server. So the hosting company might have been telling the truth. "The router failed because, ummm, it's no longer connected!" My second thought on this-- it seems like a lot of work to go to (and huge legal risk) for a few dual Xeon servers. I wonder who (or what) was hosting on those boxes. Cutting through the walls and roughing up the security guard will add a lot of years to a conviction. Maybe there's more t
    • Such distinctive equipment as an expensive Cisco router is tougher to sell. But hot-swap hard drives are easily sold on the grey market, as are modest 1U and 2U servers: few people would bother to carefully register them. Moreover, if there was credit card data on some of the servers, that's another pool of potential profit higher than a Cisco router.

      But 4 times? That's ridiculous, and screams of inside job, or covering for a "Patriot Act" raid.
    • by Z00L00K (682162)
      Except that it's a lot harder to sell a large router than a computer. More questions will be asked, and the set of buyers is much more limited.
  • by JamesRose (1062530) on Saturday November 03, 2007 @07:29PM (#21227249)
    Yes, the servers are expensive peices of kit, but I think frankly, its more likely that there is specific data for a specific site that is being stolen rather than just some hardware, and if thats true, they shoudl be hiding the friggin servers rather than leaving them sitting round "ooo rob me rob me rob me!" You gotta ask, who's the target?
  • CI Host Chicago (Score:5, Informative)

    by Average (648) on Saturday November 03, 2007 @07:37PM (#21227303)
    I've actually been in this datacenter. Tried to host some boxes there for a while... and when I finally gave up on their shenanigans, I was not near Chicago, so I just abandoned them there (cheaper than shipping).

    First, this datacenter is literally two blocks from what is left of the infamous Cabrini-Green projects. Tough neighborhood, so it's not entirely impossible that it is an outside cracked-up scheme.

    There was none of the double-man-trap doors or whatever there. The one staffer was in the back playing a Playstation. The couple of customers in the center exchanged cell numbers, so we could call each other to get let back when we needed to use the toilet.

    The Dallas billing people weren't any better. Worst... host... ever.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday November 03, 2007 @07:38PM (#21227307)
    down at the pawn shop!
  • by Stu101 (1031686) on Saturday November 03, 2007 @07:39PM (#21227311) Homepage
    Ok, so they robbed $50,000 of routers and servers.

    Where are they going to fence them. The average geek has no need of 16 core Xeons, no matter what game they play. If they were dells, (IF) they are going to have TAG #s and it wouldn't be hard to see Dell doing a trace on em, ie very hot property.

    Thirdly, no legit business, at least any I have worked in, would touch (some) state of the art servers at half price, no support, from a questionble source with no history. Same goes for all the cisco kit. Bet they end up abroad.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by AndrewM1 (648443)
      Not so much $50,000 worth of servers, as gadzillions worth of potential data. Think of how many credit card numbers/SSNs fit on $50,000 of servers... Depending on who they host (if they host any e-retailers or such) what was on the hard drives could be worth far more than the servers.
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by p0tat03 (985078)

        This is also why all small-time etailers should NEVER keep any pertinent data on the server. I run a small arts and crafts online store for my parents, and the most we keep are customer names and shipping addresses, so that they don't have to type it all back in each time they visit. Credit card info? Processed then immediately discarded. Passwords are all properly hashed. While I pray that my server never gets stolen like this, at least I know that my customers will not be in danger of identity theft (reas

  • by Overzeetop (214511) on Saturday November 03, 2007 @07:42PM (#21227331) Journal
    Seriously, cutting through a reinf. concrete wall is not trivial, if it was indeed just that. By code, the minimum thickness of a concrete wall is 6" and most used for loadbearing in anything but the cheapest residential construction are 8". You aren't cutting that with a reciprocating saw (aka Sawzall). Second, reinforced concrete walls are required (in order to be considered "reinforced" by code) to have steel bars equal to 0.0014 x wall area in both directions at a spacing no greater than 18". That typically works out to a 1/2" steel bar at 12" on center or a 5/8" steel bar at 16" o 18" on center both horizontally and vertically.

    Now, this is a non-technical publication, so "reinforced" may mean anything - like a 1/2" bar at the top and bottom, and around jambs. Also, this is Chicago, known far and wide for severe corruption in the building inspection process.

    Still, anything close to a RC wall is going to require a diamond blade and a gas powered saw for any kind of efficiency at all, and the cut rate is going to be measured in single-digit (or fractional) inches per minute. Most also require a water source for cooling. You'd have to be utterly incompetent not to catch these guys before they got in.
  • by Indy1 (99447) <spamtrap@fuckedregime.com> on Saturday November 03, 2007 @08:13PM (#21227515) Homepage
    As a company that host spammers, and threatens lawsuits (cartoonies) against anti spammers, I can only hope the crooks stole the spam servers as well.

    http://www.spamhaus.org/sbl/listings.lasso?isp=cihost.com [spamhaus.org]

  • After the second time they would have someone sitting in there all
    the time with this:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S&W_Model_500 [wikipedia.org]

    Awwww yeah...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IxLmiYiwvus [youtube.com]

    Take my server now bro!! I dare ya!
  • by inject_hotmail.com (843637) on Saturday November 03, 2007 @08:26PM (#21227625)
    I found these links to the report from a post on theregister.co.uk [theregister.co.uk]

    Report 1 Page 1 [imageshack.us]
    Report 1 Page 2 [imageshack.us]
    Report 2 Page 1 [imageshack.us]
    Report 2 Page 2 [imageshack.us]
    Report 3 Page 1 [imageshack.us]
    Report 3 Page 2 [imageshack.us]

    The guy says that $50,000 worth of stuff was stolen...not only servers, but misc crap like routers, and battery chargers for Black Berry units.

    I'd say either look for a new web host startup in the Chicago area in the next year, or a lot of stuff going cheap on Ebay.

    The saddest part about this is that the crims clubbed and zapped some innocent guy that would have offered zero resistance. For this, I hope they thieves go to jail for a long time.
  • Maybe they (Score:5, Funny)

    by monzsca (63267) on Saturday November 03, 2007 @08:39PM (#21227705) Homepage
    replaced the servers with an IBM BladeCenter [youtube.com].
  • by icepick72 (834363) on Saturday November 03, 2007 @11:58PM (#21228803)
    The night manager was unavailable for comment as he kept stuttering and jerking.
  • by IonOtter (629215) on Sunday November 04, 2007 @12:09AM (#21228857) Homepage
    Okay Frankie. Youse got da info we need to break inta da place, right?

    Yeah boss! Lookie here, on da webpage!

    Name: CDC-03
    Location: 900 North Franklin, 3rd Floor, Chicago, IL 60610
    NPA/NXX: 312/640


    Not bad, Frankie...not bad! Uh-oh...what's dis? Dis could hold us up...

    No signage, nondescript building

    No problemo, boss! See? They gave us a picture! [cihost.com]

    *snort* An dey call us teeves dumb...

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