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Bug Businesses Operating Systems Software Windows Apple

QuickTime .MOV + Toshiba + Vista = BSOD 392

Posted by kdawson
from the puzzler dept.
Question Guy writes "Apple QuickTime is involved in a troubling problem that doesn't seem to be addressed by any of the major software and hardware manufacturers involved. On Toshiba machines, such as the Protege Tablet M400s, with Windows Vista installed, opening a locally stored QuickTime .MOV causes instant bluescreen. All other video functions seem to be working in other video playback types — even streaming .MOVs work — and there is little to no 'buzz' on the Net that might push any of the parties to investigate or to play nice together (Microsoft for Vista, Intel for the GMA945 chipset, Toshiba for their custom tablet software, Apple for QuickTime). Help, anyone?"
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QuickTime .MOV + Toshiba + Vista = BSOD

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday April 22, 2007 @06:10PM (#18834765)
    An appropriate title for both Vista and Quicktime!
    • In your question you stated that the Toshiba laptop runs custom tablet software. If all other configurations of Vista, the Intel Chipset, Quicktime, and other variables work fine, you have just eliminated them as possibilities but the Tablet software. More than likely there is some call within the tablet software doing with the display that interacts when a Mov. is trying to be played locally, which causes conflict. Also, why is this Slashdot worthy?
      • by taoman1 (1050536) on Sunday April 22, 2007 @06:54PM (#18835105)
        TFA concludes by blaming it on Apple. I'm no Apple fanboy, but I don't see that at all. Unless I am misreading TFA, everything worked fine until the patches and updates were installed. I would suggest those are the problem. If they were Tablet updates, that's where the blame lies. If they were Vista updates, then the problem is there. And i agree, this is a support call, not news on /.
        • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday April 22, 2007 @07:34PM (#18835349)
          We know that Apple is not the problem because an application should never be able to invoke a BSOD, no matter how poorly written.
          • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

            by Malc (1751)
            I've heard that BS before, from the Mozilla devs. That was a couple of years before the they admitted to a huge resource leak with images that caused some computers to BSOD. Perhaps you want to blame the graphics driver... but Mozilla was the only app that triggered it. They claimed it was impossible for an application to cause a BSOD so there couldn't be anything wrong with Mozilla. Turns out they were wrong and their pig-headedness meant a massive bug sat their for years.
            • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday April 22, 2007 @10:40PM (#18836431)
              They claimed it was impossible for an application to cause a BSOD so there couldn't be anything wrong with Mozilla.

              OK, so Mozilla had a resource leak. Clearly there was also a kernel or driver bug, because a BSOD is a kernel crash.
              • by istartedi (132515) on Monday April 23, 2007 @01:28AM (#18837337) Journal

                An application shouldn't consume excessive resources.

                If an application attempts to consume excessive resources, the OS should not allow that. Appropriate responses might include failing to provide the resource, or terminating the application. A BSOD terminates everything--plainly not the correct response.

                Now, considering the .MOV+Toshiba+Vista situation... something in kernel space is plainly wrong. It might be MS code or Toshiba code. We don't know. Something in application space might be wrong too; but it makes sense to fix bugs in code that runs in the kernel first. Then, if the application "hangs" or triggers a more manageable exception (The little popup window that doesn't crash the whole OS, whatever they call that on Vista) then we know that the application had problems too. If that doesn't happen, then the application was innocent all along.

            • by haraldm (643017) on Monday April 23, 2007 @01:53AM (#18837457)
              Still, a user space app should never be able to produce a BSOD, even if it is pushing the limits. It's the OSes job to keep apps from going haywire, no matter what. They use that stuff in medical devices, airplanes and space travel, forget? It's like Windows should never execute (!) a mail attachment only according to the MIME type without looking at the file itself: The single largest problem with trojans and worms. A design error is a design error.
        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by Sillygates (967271)
          A userspace application should not be able to completely crash a system.
      • by suv4x4 (956391) on Sunday April 22, 2007 @06:59PM (#18835143)
        Also, why is this Slashdot worthy?

        Anything is.
      • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

        by Anonymous Coward
        Vista ain't done 'til iTunes won't run!
  • by Khaed (544779) on Sunday April 22, 2007 @06:10PM (#18834769)
    Vista = BSOD

    There, fixed the title for you. :)
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by mgv (198488)

      Vista = BSOD

      There, fixed the title for you. :)

      Would it not read more like:

      "A carefully crafted executable, under certain conditions may cause a denial of service attack"

      Its not that quicktime crashes - that's apples fault. Its that the operating system goes down - definitely Microsoft's fault and problem. Although I presume its at least part hardware driver given the machine specific nature.

      After all these years, it shouldn't be that easy to do. Vista was supposed to be the most secure operating system yet

      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by daeg (828071)
        Going on the idea that the most secure computer is the one never turned on, the most secure operating system is the one never installed.

        Perhaps Microsoft's marketing department consulted a modern day Oracle at Delphi and misunderstood the prediction.
        • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

          You are very close to attaining the Zen of No-Op. Now carry my water for another 5 years, and we'll see how enlightened you get.
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by myowntrueself (607117)
        After all these years, it shouldn't be that easy to do. Vista was supposed to be the most secure operating system yet. Or so I recall.

        Maybe from MS's perspective it *is* more secure for the OS to crash... rather than the driver get a buffer overrun leading to priviledge escalation...
    • Hmm, isn't it:
      VISTA = Viruses, Insecurity, Spamware, Trojans & Adware?
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by 644bd346996 (1012333)
      Vista = BS

      Fixed it for you.
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Khaed (544779)
      Christ... Flamebait/troll moderators: Grow a sense of humor.

      Flamebait implies, y'know, trying to bait a flame war. I was just being snarky.

      Troll implies, y'know, trolling for replies. I could care less.

      The truth is, Windows Vista, like every other Windows, busted out the gate with a bunch of issues. I hear a lot of negative about it, and not since ME has a system been so reviled by all the non-geeks I know who have used it.
  • VLC (Score:2, Informative)

    by DrYak (748999)
    You may try with VLC media player [videolan.org].
    Works very well with tons of formats.
    Uses its own codecs.
    Free and open source.
    Available for Windows (and also Mac OS X and Linux).
    • >You may try with VLC media player.
      >Works very well with tons of formats.

      except the format in question... VLC can't play most modern quicktime movies.

      The real issue here is a bad driver, which could be anyone's fault *but* quicktime's. That said, for most purposes VLC or mediaplayer classic is a better player on windows than quicktime.
      • Update your player. (Score:5, Informative)

        by DrYak (748999) on Sunday April 22, 2007 @07:40PM (#18835383) Homepage

        except the format in question... VLC can't play most modern quicktime movies.


        You know that there has been a few update since version 0.01, don't you ? ;-)

        Seriously, almost any modern MOV file either uses standard MPEG 4 (MPEG-4 SP/H263 and AVC/H264) or some variation of (Sorenson is a derivative of H264). The former is a standard, the later was successfully reverse-engineered and implemented in FFmpeg a couple of years ago.
        Even the latest WMV compression formats are currently being implemented into FFmpeg and thus available to VLC.

        RealVideo is pretty much everything that is still in use today and not supported by VLC. Specially since the advent of video Podcasts, PSP and cameraphones, there's a strong nove toward standardizing on non proprietary codecs like the various MPEG4.
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by gsfprez (27403)
      i had massive BSOD problems trying to use VLC in Vista. YMMV.

      I don't see on the VLC page that VLC is compatible with vista - is there something i'm missing?
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by wellingj (1030460)
        I think you are missing the point.... not much *IS* compatible with Vista.
        wow... what a role reversal with Linux...
        next thing you know my dad is going to make me cookies and my mom will make me build a fence...
      • by DrYak (748999)

        I don't see on the VLC page that VLC is compatible with vista - is there something i'm missing?


        There's a couple of minor bugs that where fixed in 0.8.6b according to the changelog [videolan.org]. Now picture should play with the Direct3D output plugin, even when in Aero mode.
        Haven't test it, though.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday April 22, 2007 @06:12PM (#18834789)
    Help, anyone?

    You can find a patch for this problem here [ubuntu.com].
  • by Rosyna (80334) on Sunday April 22, 2007 @06:13PM (#18834791) Homepage
    It says "playing a .MOV file". A .mov (MooV) file is a container format for codecs. iTunes doesn't use a "QuickTime Player" it uses QuickTime.

    It almost sounds like a particular driver or something is crashing when trying to do hardware acceleration of a particular codec (like H.264). The author seems like they're shooting bullets of blame in a wild and uncontrollable manner.
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by manekineko2 (1052430)
      Is this seriously a request for tech support from a single user being reported as if its news? This is really a brave new world of MS bashing.

      Maybe there is no "buzz" for this issue because it is limited to only this user? Or even if it affects that entire line of computers, maybe its simply the fact that Toshiba shipped shitty video drivers that crash the system on video overlay or something.
  • Probably Vista (Score:5, Insightful)

    by slughead (592713) on Sunday April 22, 2007 @06:14PM (#18834807) Homepage Journal
    The fact that it crashed was probably Apple's "bad", but the fact that it resulted in a BSOD is obviously Vista.

    Maybe this has to do with the added layer of complexity (presumably for DRM) between the kernel and video-utilizing programs... or is that just for DirectX programs?
    • by suv4x4 (956391)
      The fact that it crashed was probably Apple's "bad", but the fact that it resulted in a BSOD is obviously Vista.

      Don't be so certain. Anyone in the kernel space can cause BSOD. Which means it may be any of the kernel mode drivers Toshiba loaded their tablet with.

      The Windows version of Apple's software is quite poorly written, but I wouldn't blame it, unless they install kernel drivers (for virtual devices, and for iPod presumably). I doubt it's the case but you never know. User space software can NOT cause a
    • The fact that it crashed was probably Apple's "bad", but the fact that it resulted in a BSOD is obviously Vista.

      Maybe this has to do with the added layer of complexity (presumably for DRM) between the kernel and video-utilizing programs... or is that just for DirectX programs?
      Or maybe it's sunspots or mobile phones. Or maybe it's a deliberate Microsoft plot to make Apple look bad.

      I know, let's randomly speculate some more.
    • by Quantam (870027)
      Any crash in kernel mode (e.g. access violation) = BSOD. There are also a wide variety of other things that cause BSODs (like calling a function that is likely to take a long time while at hardware realtime priority, which would cause a complete system stall), but that's probably what this is. I believe there are some ways to catch things like access violations and recover before a BSOD is thrown (this works just like C++ try/catch pairs), but it requires the coder of the driver causing the access violation
  • Say what? (Score:2, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward
    Why is a story about a guys computer crashing on here?

    If it was a problem with a specific model, I could understand it, but it's just one guy!!!
  • by peragrin (659227) on Sunday April 22, 2007 @06:16PM (#18834817)
    last I knew apple hadn't updated quicktime or itunes, for Vista. So people are running into problems with a heavily drm'd OS not properly running applications that weren't designed to run on it.

    should i be surprised?
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by DoofusOfDeath (636671)

      should i be surprised?

      You should be a little surprised. QuickTime is a user-privileged program, not part of the kernel and not a device driver. It shouldn't be able to cause the whole OS to crash.

      But realistically, that probably just means that QuickTime is demonstrating the existence of a bug in the video driver and/or the Vista kernel. A user-privileged program can't should the whole blame for any BSOD.

  • You might have more luck with MPlayer than you are currently having with the proprietary player.

    http://www.mplayerhq.hu/design7/dload.html [mplayerhq.hu]
    • I'll second this. I've always had pretty good luck with MPlayer, even on windows. The UI takes some getting used to (it is keyboard only), but once you learn it, you'll never want anything else. In comparison, WMP, QuickTime, and PowerDVD seem bloated and buggy as hell.

      For example, I've tried to play movies on WMV (for which it did not have the codec) and locked up the computer. Which should definitely not happen. Quicktime, hooks its tray icon into your registry, tries to update itself over the internet,
  • by evilviper (135110) on Sunday April 22, 2007 @06:18PM (#18834849) Journal
    From TFA:

    or the problem could in fact be Apple's for something in the QuickTime code that's at fault.

    No, it couldn't... If you're running as an unprivileged user, the software you run shouldn't possibly be able to crash your OS.

    Drivers can, and bugs in the OS can. User-run programs can only (accidentally) trigger one of those... in which case, that's a DoS exploit in the system.
    • by bhalter80 (916317)
      You sideswipe an interesting subject here. What every happened to Vista forcing users to have unprivleged accounts? I use it and as the first installed user I seem to have had them from day 1 and since I turned off UAC I don't get harassed every minute by it telling me that I may somehow be putting my PC at risk. So indeed what about those LUAs?
    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Ant P. (974313)
      Or Apple's Quicktime software, like many other badly-written windows apps with something to hide, is using a device driver to do its dirty work.
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Animats (122034)

      Drivers can, and bugs in the OS can. User-run programs can only (accidentally) trigger one of those...

      If only. The way Microsoft does DRM [microsoft.com], much of audio and video processing takes place in kernel space.

  • Seams Im not alone. (Score:4, Informative)

    by IconKing (738117) on Sunday April 22, 2007 @06:20PM (#18834861)
    I got a Toshiba Protege M400 about a mont ago. And I have had this problem consitantly. Since I watch alot of Video Podcast using iTunes. I have searched the web for solutions to tis problem and have gotten noware. Hopefully now that it made slashdot somthing will get done about it.
  • by gsfprez (27403) on Sunday April 22, 2007 @06:23PM (#18834889)
    I installed Vista on my MacPro - in 12 minutes, i had a successfully BSOD'd Vista by playing a standard DiVX 6.0 file on Vista. (yesssss... i installed the drivers for everything)

    I think (i do not know - so back off, i'm guessing) that there is some kind of problem with Vista and video... at least, i'm seeing a trend.

    Considering the amount of work Microsoft put into preventing people from playing (assumedly pirated) video, I don't think its much of a strech to believe that its much harder for developers to make video playback software. I know that i read a very long article that talked about video card compliance and every 30ms being polled by the OS or some such bullshit, but i don't recall the link. But it was quite long, very extensive, and seemed to me that Vista's goal was not to provide a system which would foster video content creation - but rather, just the opposite.

    its rather sad, actually. Microsoft/Adobe and MS/AVID had the makings of at least pitiful competition for Apple/Apple & Apple/Avid... (Apple/Adobe? Yeah, not so much any more after NAB). I actually LIKE competition, because it means that Apple and their developers actually have to work to make better products.

    With all of the pain that's obivously involved with working HD video (which inclueds VIEWING IT) on Vista, there won't be much competition. If Vista is a shitty at video work as its looking to be, i suspect that Apple will be able to kick back on the beach with a mai-tai and not have to evern try... i mean, HD playback is 100% zero effort (assuming you aren't trying to do it on a PowerBook 520c) in Mac OS X - there's no DRM invovled whatsoever (except for BR and HDDVDs).... and the video cards Just Work(TM), and Quicktime just works, and VLC just works and DIVX just works.... etc.

    sucks to have your workflow based upon a product that is EOL in 7 months (Windows XP + ___________). Personally, i don't care. I've long stopped caring about the abuse people that use Windows for video work put themselves thru... sure, Windows did some things faster back in the day, but all of that is totally gone now, isn't it?

    Now, its all about the OS.
    • The BSoD is being caused by a driver, most likely the video one. Userspace applications cannot cause Windows to bluescreen, not since NT4 was released in the mid-90s. An application might be the vector for the fault, but it's not the ultimate cause.

      VideoLAN works fine on Vista with just about any format I've tried, which includes older MOVs and Real videos. So does MediaPlayer Classic and the YouTube-style streaming Flash video.

      This has nothing to do with "DRM", and seriously, Apple software for Windows

      • Apple software for Windows has always sucked rocks

        back in the day (circa 2002) i was working with a cruddy old machine and wanted to watch some divx on it.. but wmp kept stuttering.. so i installed quicktime and used it.. it used 20% less resources and its dependability was the first of many factors which got me to switch to mac.

        that said, quicktime 7 was a major step down from 6.x because they broke the caching (making it stutter even on osX), but that has nothing to do with the platform it runs on.

      • by Bert64 (520050)
        Actually not since NT3, which had it's video drivers in userspace too (thus a video driver was far less likely to crash the system)... NT4 moved them to kernel space, and was far more crash prone.

        Vista was also supposed to move the video drivers back to userspace for stability reasons, are you saying this was yet another feature that got canned from the final release?
    • by robbiethefett (1047640) on Sunday April 22, 2007 @06:37PM (#18834995)
      i have a small home-based audio recording studio, and i'm becoming more involved in the whole computer music scene. from what i gather, quite a large number of studios have decided to switch entirely to Mac for production environments. i guess vista stepped on so many toes that a lot of shops that run XP have been migrating to Macs and plan to be exclusively apple shops, even before XP's end of life. for some reason, professionals seem to be pissed off that MS wants to control what they do with their own data.. can't imagine why.
      • by mochan_s (536939)

        I think this is an excellent time for Linux to come in into the audio production market ( maybe also video production though I don't know anything about video production ).

        Windows XP is a pain but a bearable pain to get the studio running around it. Vista probably will be impossible and a bad idea with all the DRM code lurking inside it. I don't want to go to a Mac environment together ( coz everything surrounding Mac is more expensinve, from the little accessories to the major controllers and such )

        A n

    • by toby (759) * on Sunday April 22, 2007 @07:16PM (#18835239) Homepage Journal
      I know that i read a very long article that talked about video card compliance and every 30ms being polled by the OS or some such bullshit

      The article you probably mean is Peter Gutmann's A Cost Analysis of Windows Vista Content Protection [auckland.ac.nz], which memorably coined the phrase,

      The Vista Content Protection specification could very well constitute the longest suicide note in history


      At least, we can hope.
  • kind of rediculous (Score:5, Informative)

    by sentientbrendan (316150) on Sunday April 22, 2007 @06:25PM (#18834907)
    that he blames quicktime for a BSOD...

    Nothing but a bad driver, bad hardware, or a *bad kernel* can cause a BSOD (read kernel panic). It doesn't matter that other movie players don't cause it. If the driver's and kernel didn't have a bug, it would be impossible for *any* userspace application, quicktime or otherwise, to cause a kernel panic.

    Quicktime isn't the greatest movie player ever... but it couldn't possibly be at the root of this problem. It is clearly simply exposing an underlying problem.
  • by Aphrika (756248) on Sunday April 22, 2007 @06:26PM (#18834911)
    I must say that I've seen a spate of strange crashes and stuff with the last few point updates to QuickTime on both Macs and PCs. The last update solved a few of them, but in my current line of work (which is IT sysadmin for a media company with 200+ machines) QuickTime functioning properly is vital to business.

    First port of call would be QuickTime itself. As there are 'known issues' with iTunes and Vista, and we know that QuickTime and iTunes integrate pretty closely, I'd uninstall the iTunes/Quicktime install and try installing just the standalone player. There could be iTunes hooks into QuickTime that might be breaking something. It also makes sure you've got the most recent QuickTime install.

    This has fixed a few of the problems I've seen over the past few months.

    Secondly, I'd try a variety of different .mov files. There's a chance it could be an issue with your machine and specific encoding method that certain types of .mov files use. Thirdly, I'd try some other media files in it, like mp4 video or H.264. These can also be played back in other players and success or failure would point you in the direction of whether it's QuickTime or something deeper - such as a graphics driver - at fault.

    Thirdly, I'd think back and ask yourself if you've seen any other odd graphic behaviour on your PC recently. That might indicate a driver issue. Make usre in cases like this that you're using the manufacturer approved drivers.

    Fourthly, I'd look at downloading Microsoft's Application Compatibility Tools and seeing whether there's anything on your machine that doesn't run under Vista. Specifically look out for items with a graphical angle such as screen managers etc.
  • Suggestions (Score:2, Interesting)

    by nagashi (684628)
    Install Quicktime Alternative (http://www.free-codecs.com/download/QuickTime_Al t ernative.htm)

    Then try using media player classic to open the file. Quicktime alternative is a freeware quicktime codec, and will let you watch quicktime movies in an application of your choice. See also: http://www.free-codecs.com/download/Real_Alternati ve.htm [free-codecs.com]

    There is no need to be tied to realplayer or quicktime on windows.
    • The link you gave is to the Real Alternative, (which is great, btw, but not exactly useful in this situation). There are two versions of the Quicktime Alternative software, linked to here [intercom.net]. Version 1.52 is for Quicktime 6, and supports older Microsoft OS's, the other is 1.63 which is based on Quicktime 7, but only works on NT5+ kernels (W2k, XP, Vista).
    • Sorry, I missed the Quicktime Alternative link in your original thread (wasn't link-ified).
  • by BrianPan (786919) on Sunday April 22, 2007 @06:39PM (#18835011)
    > from the puzzler dept.

    The part that's puzzling is why we need to summon all the readers of the Slashdot front page to fix this guy's laptop.
  • BS o' D? (Score:4, Funny)

    by NJVil (154697) on Sunday April 22, 2007 @06:41PM (#18835031)
    It's a new Vista feature reminding you to switch to Windows Media Player.
  • by robson (60067) on Sunday April 22, 2007 @06:43PM (#18835039)
    ...and we run Windows XP, not Vista.

    Any attempt to watch a Quicktime file from a local drive results in problems (usually an instant bluescreen, but sometimes general breakage -- taskbar not responding, apps not closing when ordered, menus not responding, that sort of thing).

    Viewing a movie that exists elsewhere on the network is fine. Viewing a movie from the Internet still breaks things, presumably because it's still getting cached to the local drive.

    They're not brand-name computers, but they were all put together by the same place, presumably with similar specs. Nobody's dug into it too deeply, we've just gotten used to moving all *.mov files to a network drive before viewing. :)
  • by LighterShadeOfBlack (1011407) on Sunday April 22, 2007 @06:54PM (#18835109) Homepage
    So my wireless USB dongle stopped working when I upgraded to Ubuntu 7.04. It seems Network Manager doesn't like the rt73usb driver, or just about any RALink driver judging by the Ubuntu Forums. Help, anyone?

    What, you mean /. isn't the place to post bug reports? Could've fooled me...
  • by overshoot (39700) on Sunday April 22, 2007 @06:56PM (#18835123)
    With enough eyes and all that.

    Someone post the source code to the OS, drivers, and player and we'll have a look.

    Oh, wait ...

  • Ok,

    So why haven't you a) called Toshiba, b) called Microsoft? When did slashdot become "I can't figure out the problem, i've searched all the forums and I'm completely out of ideas of who to turn to, so what shall I do? I know I'll call a linux/unix news website"?

  • by flyingfsck (986395) on Sunday April 22, 2007 @07:10PM (#18835201)
    Vista ain't done, till QuickTime won't run.
  • by SkullOne (150150) on Sunday April 22, 2007 @07:25PM (#18835291) Homepage
    This isn't news. Quicktime is a horrible piece of software. I have personaly tested about 50 machines with various SCSI controllers in Windows XP and 2003 which either BSOD in Quicktime, or get horrible audio/video syncing problems.
    The only commonality was they all used LSI or Adaptec SCSI controllers. Playing off an IDE drive or SATA drive worked fine.
    We sent bug reports to Apple and Microsoft, ran traces on the programs, and it always came down to Quicktime.
    Microsoft made a hotfix available that was a workaround, something to do with caching the data to page first, then sending it to quicktime, but it was a slow and dirty hack.
    Apple said it was the SCSI controllers sending corrupt data, which was rediculous, every single other application, media, worked perfect.

    Quicktime shittyness is HARDLY anything new at all.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by NMerriam (15122)
      Since when does Quicktime come with kernel mode disk controller drivers? I agree it isn't a great piece of Windows software, but I fail to see how it should have anything whatsoever to do with how the data is being read from the disk by the OS -- if the OS can read the network/SCSI/SATA/PATA drive, what difference does it make to quicktime other than read performance? How can QT cause a BSOD reading from a particular device when it has nothing to do with the driver accessing the device?
  • by csirac (574795) on Sunday April 22, 2007 @07:26PM (#18835299) Homepage
    Running PcAnywhere on your XP laptop that happens to be a Toshiba, and apparently in combination with a Symantec AV product (NAV IIRC) would result in a guranteed blue screen on every shutdown.

    Had never seen that before with this software combination on any laptop except some Toshibas at work back in the day.

    Nearest KB article I could find on Symantec was 2003112516321112, but it's only available via Google cache at http://72.14.253.104/search?q=cache:FBy7QXRHzIIJ:s ervice1.symantec.com/SUPPORT/pca.nsf/1ab3f998698d6 46f88256f48005b9e71/b998f8fb40c5dc3988256dea000204 6d%3FOpenDocument+site:symantec.com+toshiba+shutdo wn+pcanywhere&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=1&gl=au&client=fire fox-a [72.14.253.104]
  • by Sergeant Beavis (558225) on Sunday April 22, 2007 @08:50PM (#18835763) Homepage
    Disclaimer: I USED to work at Microsoft and I now own a Mac.

    Here is an example of an idiot trying to look smart. Have you bothered to have someone look at the memory dump? What was the stop code? Did you check the event logs?

    The fact is, it could be ANY of the three things mentioned or NONE of them. It could be an anti virus filter driver. It could be a memory access violation in Kernel Mode memory. It could have absolutely nothing to do with Vista or QT or even the Toshiba's drivers. It could be that the author is just stupid.

    I'm leaning in the direction that this author is simply ignorant but since he felt he should write an article and place blame with minimal evidence to support his claim, he falls solidly in the stupid category.

    The only fact that the author has presented is that he had a BSOD when using QT on Vista on Toshiba hardware when playing a local file. That only gives you suspects. A lawyer should know better. I've had occasions where customers swore up and down that one product was causing a BSOD and the memory dump pointed squarely at another product. Rarely (on XP) did I ever see a memory dump that actually pointed the finger at Windows. More often than not, I've seen memory dumps caused by filter drivers used by anti virus.

    Perhaps Mr Fishkin should write more about being a lawyer because he damn well doesn't know much about computers.

    • by Question Guy (306426) on Sunday April 22, 2007 @11:30PM (#18836717) Homepage
      Aloha everyone,

      I'm out here and thanks in part to Slashdot, my M400 tablet is playing quicktime movies like a champ now :)
      The rant below aside, I DO very much appreciate the community thought that went into this, the response was great and that seems to have gotten the attention of Toshiba, which has issued a new RAID driver.

      So, for whatever reason I still don't understand, Quicktime was accessing hard drives , those controlled by the SATA RAID controller in the laptop AND the ones hooked up by USB (external drives)in such a different way that the computer BSOD'ed every time.
      I don't pretend to understand it fully, I just knew from the start that it was some fundamental level of tinkering I couldn't do on my own.

      A hearty thanks to everyone who offered advice, called me or the author an idiot, or delved deeper into information that couldn't have been contained in the paltry few sentances I wrote for the story submission. hehe. I went out to lunch to buy some RAM, and there were 200 posts, so I'm sorry I wasn't more involved in giving MORE information. I know that everyone needed it, but I missed the window on timing, I think... who knew it would get accepted and start up such a fire-storm of responses?
      It reminds me of that maxim "Whe you assume, you make an ass out of u and me. :) Of course, that in part was the point, right?
      Submit a vexing problem to Slashdot, give just enough information for people to identify it and hope and pray that someone smart, informed, kind slashdotter would know the answer when all the google queries in the world, tech support hours wasted and dead end hunches didn't get me anywhere.

      Hooray for everyone!

  • by ZackSchil (560462) on Sunday April 22, 2007 @09:28PM (#18835981)
    Space must have collapsed into its self due to too much terrible design being in the same place at the same time. A Toshiba laptop + Quicktime for Windows + Microsoft Vista?! This guy is lucky to be alive.
  • Problem Solved! (Score:3, Informative)

    by Question Guy (306426) on Monday April 23, 2007 @12:42AM (#18837117) Homepage
    Aloha everyone,

    I'm out here in Hawaii and ,thanks in part to Slashdot, my M400 tablet is playing quicktime movies like a champ now :)
    The rant below aside, I DO very much appreciate the community thought that went into this, the response was great and that seems to have gotten the attention of Toshiba, which has issued a new RAID driver.

    So, for whatever reason I still don't understand, Quicktime was accessing hard drives , those controlled by the SATA RAID controller in the laptop AND the ones hooked up by USB (external drives)in such a different way that the computer BSOD'ed every time.
    I don't pretend to understand it fully, I just knew from the start that it was some fundamental level of tinkering I couldn't do on my own.

    A hearty thanks to everyone who offered advice, called me or the author an idiot, or delved deeper (too deep) into information that couldn't have been contained in the paltry few sentances I wrote for the story submission. hehe. I went out to lunch to buy some RAM, and then there were 200 posts, so I'm sorry I wasn't more involved in giving MORE information. I know that everyone needed it, but I missed the window on timing, I think... who knew it would get accepted and start up such a fire-storm of responses?
    It reminds me of that maxim "Whe you assume, you make an ass out of u and me." :) Of course, that in part was the point, right?
    Submit a vexing problem to Slashdot, give just enough information for people to identify it and hope and pray that someone smart, informed, kind slashdotter would know the answer when all the google queries in the world, tech support hours wasted and dead end hunches didn't get me anywhere.

    Hooray for everyone!
  • by yakumo.unr (833476) on Monday April 23, 2007 @07:09AM (#18838639) Homepage
    I had this exact same problem a couple of years ago, it was caused by bad (terrible) drivers for the Adaptec SATA card I had (1210sa, using Sil 3112 chipset).

    Moving the mov file to any drive not using that controller and it played perfectly.
    From the 1210sa, an instant unrecoverable lock would occur. maybe 5% of mov's I tried wouldn't lock the drive, but those that did it was a definite and 100% repeatable problem, irrespective of player used, or quicktime version.

    I reported it to Adaptec several times, as it was fixed and then broken again with different releases, but never acknowledged.

    Changed to a Promise controller instead.
  • by QuietLagoon (813062) on Monday April 23, 2007 @07:40AM (#18838735)
    Has a nice ring to it.

"Consistency requires you to be as ignorant today as you were a year ago." -- Bernard Berenson

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