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Happy World Backup Day

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  • by Tastecicles (1153671) on Sunday March 31, 2013 @11:55AM (#43324677)

    I've committed every one and zero to memory.

  • Wonder when is (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday March 31, 2013 @12:01PM (#43324719)

    World Restore Day?

  • by ColdWetDog (752185) on Sunday March 31, 2013 @12:02PM (#43324725) Homepage

    Wait a sec. I should think it would be "Restore" day. At least for those of the various Christian persuasions.

    • by fustakrakich (1673220) on Sunday March 31, 2013 @12:11PM (#43324811) Journal

      Yeah, really. Backup Day should be on the Thursday preceding Good Friday.

      • In all seriousness, this is something we all probably don't do enough. How good are the backups if you can't restore from them? Do you really want the first time you verify your backups to be after a disaster?
    • No, Backup Day would make more sense if it falls on Easter... Easter was when Jesus went Backup to heaven!

      **da dum ta**

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Actually no, that was 40 days after His resurrection. nice try tho.

    • by kermidge (2221646)

      Makes sense. A backup is little good if one can't restore from it.

    • by Chemisor (97276) on Sunday March 31, 2013 @12:41PM (#43325025)

      You can't be restored if you haven't been saved.

      • by CODiNE (27417)

        Not necessarily.
        Acts 24:15 "There will be a resurrection of both the righteous and the unrighteous"

        So it's more like an offsite whole-disk backup. That let's the operator later restore files they may not have originally planned to.

    • by fa2k (881632)

      Wait a sec. I should think it would be "Restore" day. At least for those of the various Christian persuasions.

      Ignoring the joke for a second, Restore Day is a great idea! The only thing worse than not having backups is to have faulty backups, believing they are OK.

  • by Murdoch5 (1563847) on Sunday March 31, 2013 @12:03PM (#43324739)
    I always buy hard disks in Pairs and Raid them, each disk has a back up.
    • by poity (465672)

      What if a surge takes both of them out? Wouldn't it be safer to leave one drive completely disconnected and only turned on for syncing to the other?

      • by Murdoch5 (1563847)
        Oh I have high quality power surpression on all the wall outlets that I connect computers or AV equipment to. So well a surge could happen it would have to make it through a very high quality surve power bar and a UPS. So I'm not actually worried about it. The PSU's in all my computers are also super high quality, so if they did every blow ( which hasn't happened to me ) I would jsut prosue the manufacture because they're covered. For me none of the data is really so important that I'm going to take ad
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by rgmoore (133276)

        What if a surge takes both of them out?

        Or user stupidity erases the vital data? Or malware starts corrupting your files? Or a disaster destroys the whole computer?

        RAID is a great solution to hard drive failure, but it doesn't cover all of the other things that might go wrong. For that, you need a proper off-line backup that can protect you against user or OS problems, ideally one that's located far enough away to recover your data in the event of a disaster. RAID is best in addition to, not as a repla

        • What if a surge takes both of them out?

          Or user stupidity erases the vital data? Or malware starts corrupting your files? Or a disaster destroys the whole computer?

          RAID is a great solution to hard drive failure, but it doesn't cover all of the other things that might go wrong. For that, you need a proper off-line backup that can protect you against user or OS problems, ideally one that's located far enough away to recover your data in the event of a disaster. RAID is best in addition to, not as a replacement for, true backups.

          I've been wondering about this.

          What if I have a RAID1 array and a bunch of spare drives. I pull a drive from the array and plug one of the spares in. Now the pulled drive is a backup and the array is syncing onto the new disk.

          So long as the array does the right thing when I put one of the old disks in (ie it syncs over the old data and doesn't sync from it (ouch)) I should be able to carry on like this and maintain a backup set. Right?

          • by Peter Bortas (130)

            A bit controller dependant, but yes, many sysadms keep a copy of the OS this way when they do risky upgrades.

          • Works fine as long as the controller / RAID software syncs the remaining good disk to the newly installed disk and not the other way around.

            If you plan on doing something like that regularly, you should consider doing a 3-way mirror (3 disks, RAID-1) so that you're left with two good disks after pulling one. Easily done in Linux software RAID or the better (real hardware) RAID controllers.

            (My feeling is that if you are going to dedicate a spare disk to a RAID-1 array, you may as well make use of it by
    • by danomac (1032160)

      Well, I have a RAID 6 and I just noticed the other day that one disk dropped out. Waiting for WD to ship me a replacement.

      Talk about alarm/monitoring fail: the monitoring tools nor the card gave any hint of a problem. Wonder how long it's been like that.

      Most of the stuff I have on my computer I could care less if I lost it. Pictures? Meh. The ones I cared about I actually had developed. Music? Meh. I'll re-rip all my CDs. That's a pain, but I wouldn't technically lose anything. Other miscellaneous (taxes, e

      • Music? Meh. I'll re-rip all my CDs. That's a pain, but I wouldn't technically lose anything.

        You'd still lose the multitrack masters if it's music that you wrote and recorded unless you burned a backup of the multitrack masters.

    • by AmiMoJo (196126) *

      Nice subtle troll there. As everyone knows RAID is not a backup.

      • by Murdoch5 (1563847)
        Raid is a backup, if you have drive mirroring going on then you have an active backup at all times.
    • by Peter Bortas (130)

      If it's one thing you take from backup this, please let it be this: Redundancy is not backup. Many tears have been shed from misunderstanding this.

      • by Murdoch5 (1563847)
        The formal definition might not be correct but logically if you have all the information being mirrored then you do have a backup! Well many people wont agree and I'm not saying they're wrong, having a Raid setup does give you a "copy" of your data and therefore means you have a backup. A backup good enough for what I need, well it might not suit the business world, it does suit my house perfectly.
        • by Peter Bortas (130)

          It not a backup if you can not restore a deleted file from it. A backup saves you from mistakes, redundancy saves you from broken hardware.

  • I've made sure the phone number for the local data recovery services is taped to the side of the server.

  • by AliasMarlowe (1042386) on Sunday March 31, 2013 @12:06PM (#43324769) Journal
    Automated incremental backup of the headless servers at home, every two days (and I check the backup logs regularly). The backup disks are cycled every 4 weeks: the existing set goes to an insulated box in the garage (a separate heated building), while the previous disks come in and start with a full backup. Our 4 workstations at home all get backed up to local USB disks, but these are merely for convenience - important files are always kept on the servers, where they belong.
    • Re:Automated backup (Score:4, Interesting)

      by RabidReindeer (2625839) on Sunday March 31, 2013 @02:27PM (#43325723)

      Automated incremental backup of the headless servers at home, every two days (and I check the backup logs regularly). The backup disks are cycled every 4 weeks: the existing set goes to an insulated box in the garage (a separate heated building), while the previous disks come in and start with a full backup. Our 4 workstations at home all get backed up to local USB disks, but these are merely for convenience - important files are always kept on the servers, where they belong.

      You don't belong on this planet.

      Seriously, I run RAID, cross-machine mirroring, then do daily backups, with the logs emailed to me each morning. Periodic external media copies to DVD and USB devices. In my case, I have incentive, though. I used to work for a big-name backup software company and knew of design flaws that meant that a certain percentage of backups would write out defective data. And got burned in later years when I was compelled to use the product for my later employer. Because the RAID arrays would blow a disk the minute I'd leave on vacation, then blow a second one before I got back to replace it. And the restore would fail.

      For a long time I used TAR scripts, because unlike the fancy expensive commercial products, I could always count on being able to use a tarball as long as the media itself was undamaged.

      Ironically, this is the weekend I started learning Bacula. Tar is reliable, but it doesn't manage media catalogs.

      • Automated incremental backup of the headless servers at home, every two days (and I check the backup logs regularly). The backup disks are cycled every 4 weeks: the existing set goes to an insulated box in the garage (a separate heated building), while the previous disks come in and start with a full backup. Our 4 workstations at home all get backed up to local USB disks, but these are merely for convenience - important files are always kept on the servers, where they belong.

        You don't belong on this planet.

        Well, maybe just on this tiny little fragment of the planet. Among other wierdnesses, we're linux-only at home - servers, laptops, desktops - which helps a lot with automating stuff. BTW, the kids picked up Linux quite easily, and are now proficient in using xfce as much as in using Windows XP or 7 (their schools endure both).

        Seriously, I run RAID, cross-machine mirroring, then do daily backups, with the logs emailed to me each morning. Periodic external media copies to DVD and USB devices. In my case, I have incentive, though. I used to work for a big-name backup software company and knew of design flaws that meant that a certain percentage of backups would write out defective data. And got burned in later years when I was compelled to use the product for my later employer. Because the RAID arrays would blow a disk the minute I'd leave on vacation, then blow a second one before I got back to replace it. And the restore would fail.

        I dread the day I'll have to restore from backups; this is a major motivation for being ready for it. The instant I'm unready, Murphy will surely smite us...

        Restoring should go ea

    • by PNutts (199112)

      The backup disks are cycled every 4 weeks: the existing set goes to an insulated box in the garage (a separate heated building), while the previous disks come in and start with a full backup.

      That's a bad strategy: Conflagration, flood, tornado, hurricane, theft, landslide, sinkhole, etc. Pretty much anything catastrophic wipes them out.

  • I catalog all of my 1s and 0s in a series of sequentially numbered composition notebooks. College ruled, 100 pages each.

    And then I photocopy them for redundancy.

    • I don't like the mess, so I group the ones and zeros sequentially.
      • by Gordonjcp (186804)

        Aha, the trick is, only the ones actually carry information - that's when the bit is actually holding a voltage. So, you can compress out all the zeros and get a roughly 2:1 saving on space!

        The only downside is that for decompressing, the codebook is necessarily rather large, in fact the same size as your original data. But the compression works well and it's fast!

    • and a heck of a fire risk...

    • my one's and zero's are just like my women.

      I have binders full of 'em!

  • by mikem170 (698970) on Sunday March 31, 2013 @12:09PM (#43324783) Homepage

    I have a script that can setup a bootable partitioned usb drive, set it up to be encrypted, then dd/rsync all my system and data files to it.

    I keep a couple of these bootable-backups around, one of them off-site.

    I can connect the usb drive to another pc and boot my system up on it. If I need to I can run the script and have it copy everything from the usb drive to the new pc internal drive.

    This system has served me well for a number of years, and a number of computers.

    I'm running Freebsd and I use GEOM for encryption. I did do a new system install to go from 32 bit to 64 bit. Otherwise this system has served me well for a number of years, through a number of computers, with minimal effort.

  • damn I was forced to write text.

  • "Only wimps use tape backup: real men just upload their important stuff on ftp, and let the rest of the world mirror it." - Linus Torvalds, 1996

    • Unless they've got the mirrors set up to automatically replicate your mistakes, in which case it's possible to accidentally delete every copy of it in existence everywhere... (This nearly happened to one OSS project recently.)

      Mirrors are not backup. They are uptime reliability.

    • "Only wimps use tape backup: real men just upload their important stuff on ftp, and let the rest of the world mirror it." - Linus Torvalds, 1996

      Alternatively, send it to Wikileaks.

  • So...I'll shoot:

    What is the best online backup service? It doesn't have to be the cheapest (but it helps) - I have used Crashplan and tested Livedrive - they both offer unlimited option and a hassle-free client which works at least quite good, but as Crashplan had a price-hike I'm looking for something else, or is there maybe even superior service I should look into (I'm thinking a scenario where my main OS hard drive just quits with no warning, are there simple online solutions to fully restore you from di

    • I swear by MegaUpload... ...said one of the world's most OCD document packrats in December 2011.

    • by LRAD (1822746)
      Amazon Glacier is supposed to be pretty cool for long term archival. It's cheap per gigabyte, but the caveat is that there is a wait time to pull your data out of their archives, so it's not suitable for something that needs to be online immediately. Haven't tried it quite yet, but the idea makes sense to me. https://aws.amazon.com/glacier/ [amazon.com]
      • by Skater (41976)
        I've been using it for a few months, using CloudGates.net to transfer data to it (the SimpleAmazonGlacierUploader java applet had a bug in it that affects larger files - not sure if it's been fixed yet). It's pretty great - I have 136 gigabytes of data at the moment, so I get a bill for $1.36 each month. For the money, the hassle of building a server to put at a friend's place isn't worth it, and I couldn't find any other backup solutions that are as cheap. Yes, directory listings and downloads take a fe
        • by SpzToid (869795) on Monday April 01, 2013 @01:02AM (#43328589)

          Thanks a lot for writing up this suggestion. I had no idea Amazon Glacier was only a penny per gigabyte, and thus a realistic way for me to backup virtual machines offsite, finally, (using only my available slow home upload bandwidth). Which got me to Searching on the net...

          CloudGates.net does indeed look like a useful service.

          A Search engine lead me to a free Windows client called FastGlacier http://fastglacier.com/faq.aspx [fastglacier.com]

          This technote from 'AWS Blog' explains how to use the more standard and better documented Amazon S3 Data buckets to automatically offload data after a specified time to Amazon Glacier storage. The trick is to create a lifecycle rule. I'm inclined to try this, once I get myself better organized, although CloudGates also looks very worthy. Kudos! http://aws.typepad.com/aws/2012/11/archive-s3-to-glacier.html [typepad.com]

          Happy World Backup Day!

    • by alen (225700)

      how much do you really need to back up?

      i have about 80GB of family photos that i really care about. they are on separate hard drives
      porn, who cares. its all in the cloud and all the same
      pirated movies? if you have to spend money to backup and manage pirated content you might as well buy DVD's or legit digital content like itunes
      important documents? i use dropbox for that

      • by zyzko (6739)

        I don't need necessarily an unlimited solution. My photos and music (which I have also on CDs but it is a great frigging pain to re-rip them) are the ones I need. And yeah, separate hard drives do a fine job, but if the price is right I'd like to outsource it (and there is the plus side that if for some reason those both hard drives are fried I have an off-site backup). A huge bonus would be if I could have an off-site disaster recovery backup of my OS disk (Windows here...) but I guess that is something th

  • by sootman (158191) on Sunday March 31, 2013 @12:26PM (#43324917) Homepage Journal

    I put all my data in a cave and sealed the entrance with a big rock -- but three days later it was all gone.

    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward

      It's okay, your data just went to the cloud.

  • by Jeremi (14640) on Sunday March 31, 2013 @12:26PM (#43324919) Homepage

    Time machine requires about zero maintenance and will help me recover quickly if my main hard drive dies. Of course, if a fire or theft results in the simultaneous loss of the backup drive as well, I'm out of luck. So for data that's worth spending a little extra time securing, checking it in to an SVN server works for me.

    • Time machine requires about zero maintenance and will help me recover quickly if my main hard drive dies. Of course, if a fire or theft results in the simultaneous loss of the backup drive as well, I'm out of luck. So for data that's worth spending a little extra time securing, checking it in to an SVN server works for me.

      I wonder if an arrangement with the neighbours would help: "I put my Time Capsule in your loft, and you put yours in my loft". Now you would need a fire that destroys two houses for permanent data loss, and at that point you won't cry about the data loss, but celebrate that you are both still alive.

      • by Jeremi (14640)

        I wonder if an arrangement with the neighbours would help: "I put my Time Capsule in your loft, and you put yours in my loft".

        Sure, that could work. Of course take this idea to its logical extreme and you have BuddyBackup [buddybackup.com] (not meant as an endorsement, just as an example; I'm sure there are other similar services out there that are just as good)

  • by meerling (1487879) on Sunday March 31, 2013 @12:29PM (#43324927)
    The First Three Rules of Computing

    1 - Backup
    2 - Backup
    3 - See Rules 1 & 2

    Of course, I have no idea how to backup a world. What kind of media would you use, cosmic string recorders?
  • I recently bought a 3TB drive and filled up my case entirely. I took out my old 750 and 640GB drives and got an Orico 2 Bay Drive dock. One will consist of an encrypted volume filled with all my non-video media backups and virtual machine disk images, and the other will contain my system image via windows backup. I'll probably update the backups ever month or so. Plus I can pull the drives out of this thing and store them in a cool dry place in static bags in case my computer gets struck by lightning.
  • by RealGene (1025017) on Sunday March 31, 2013 @12:35PM (#43324993)
    That is all.
  • I use crashplan's client and all my pcs backup to my home server. All my photos get backed up to a second disk that I keep off site. Their software works pretty flawlessly. I was going to use their cloud service but photo and video data would take months to seed.
    • by Nerdfest (867930)

      I use their hosted backups in addition to local and offsite. The price is just too good to pass up (~6$/month for 10 machines when I signed up). They do security right, have no space limit or speed throttling. Take the hit and start backing stuff up. It will eventually finish and at some point you may be glad you did it. Of course, you could also back up using their client to a friends machine, and vice-versa, but I figure their hosting is less trouble (and you could always do both).

  • Relaaaaax (Score:1, Funny)

    by Tablizer (95088)

    You guys are just a bunch of paranoid sons of b ~ '[ &z ( j ` NO CARRIER

  • by vinn (4370) on Sunday March 31, 2013 @12:44PM (#43325049) Homepage Journal

    I managed to go 16 years in the IT world, first as a sys admin and now up through an awesome mid-level management position, without any serious data management scares. (And by 'awesome', I mean I work for demoralizing leadership and I've hit a glass ceiling which will force me to go find another company to work for if I want any shot at career advancement.) I've always made sure there's many, many layers of redundancy and good processes in place.

    That was until three weeks ago.

    We use Microsoft DFS to sync data between two sites. Because of some other things going on, we had to turn DFS off for 3 weeks. We thought we had everyone transitioned to using the "master" file repository, the one that gets backed up every night, etc, etc. The day we turned on DFS back on, all hell broke loose.

    Oh - and this is fairly important stuff: 10 years worth of CAD, design, and legal paperwork. It's a few terabytes worth. For our medium-size company, this is basically everything that we hold near and dear.

    The first thing that happened is DFS completely puked and completely trashed BOTH filesystems. Fantastic, Microsoft - what a wonderful piece of shit DFS is. Fairly quickly we had to face some data integrity issues. First, we discovered apparently there was a fella at the remote site that was using the copy of files there. Great.. through a fairly manual process we were able to retrieve most of his changes to the dataset. Next, we fairly quickly gave up on trying to fix the DFS - on the advice of Microsoft it seemed to be fairly hopeless.

    This is where shit gets real.

    Our head sys admin had been troubleshooting an issue with a drive in a RAID'ed NAS backup device had failed. All the other backups had been shifted to other NAS devices, but that backup was so large that it apparently had just been failing. While looking for that, we also discovered the quarterly backup from December had failed (that's the point where I wanted to put on my manager hat and go rip someone a new one, but decided that probably wouldn't be the most productive thing at the moment and could save that little teachable moment asskicking until after we were out of the woods.) Now, the sys admin hadn't been completely foolish, before turning DFS back on he had run some full backups using a different NAS device.

    In a f*cking brilliant stroke of disastrous luck, when we went to perform the recovery we discovered that RAID array on the backup NAS device also had corruption.

    Now, how bad the corruption was and what exactly that meant remained to be seen. The backups had completed without error, it was the NAS filesystem itself that was throwing the errors. The NAS was still running and our backup software seemed to recognize the backup catalogs on it. Ok, other than what seemed to one potentially corrupt backup, it was seeming like the next best case scenario was a quarterly backup from September, and I was also staring a complete set of disks from 2010 dreading the thought of bringing them back online. Well, with nothing to do other than try a restore, we pressed the button.

    That's when I went home mid-morning, chainsmoked four cigarettes on my porch and wondered what would happened if everything went south. In other words, I was contemplating my next job.

    'Lo and behold, and restore worked. We had to merge all kinds of things back together to get a complete copy reassembled, then we still had to get DFS working (which took four days of syncing over the WAN.) When it was all said and done, it looked like there were just two files from one set of changes that we couldn't recover.

    I think I'll go double check on the backup jobs now.

    • Wait ... so you read /. and you thought a Microsoft tool would avoid disasters? I think rapid reading classes are needed - quickly followed by an LTO drive and some tapes.
      • Seriously, I would have picked practically anything but a Microsoft branded solution for syncing the data between sites.

        I sure don't claim to have all the best answers for I.T. backup, but I'm in charge of redesigning an aging backup system for the office I work in -- and I'm finding you really need to choose your backup tools carefully.

        For example, the company purchased Symantec Backup Exec 2012 and wanted me to do the nightly backups with it, and a couple of LTO drives attached to one of the servers. I pr

    • by Pop69 (700500)
      Learn to do a test restore. A backup is useful, a proven working backup is priceless
  • by phase_9 (909592) on Sunday March 31, 2013 @12:47PM (#43325069) Homepage

    Amazon Glacier [amazon.com] has really changed my backup strategy since this time last year - I now push all my own, generated content (ie: pictures, documents, things I could never get back if I lost everything) up to Glacier using the free Windows client, Fast Glacier [fastglacier.com]. In February I was charged $0.13 by Amazon for storing ~8Gb of data. I tend to push new content up as and when I create it (for example, after I process holiday snaps, or get back from a day out).

    Day to day file changes are now handled by Windows 8's File History [microsoft.com] feature where my changes are pushed to a small NAS (Dlink DNS-320 [dlink.com]) in my shed (technically off site?) over a Homeplug AV [wikipedia.org] ethernet link. For added security I use the legacy Windows Backup application [arstechnica.com] (still present in Windows 8) to create ~ monthly snapshots of the system which I store on a 320Gb external HDD. This drive is one of two which go back and forth between my parents house each time I got and visit. These disks are encrypted using Microsoft Bitlocker drive encryption [microsoft.com].

    I should get around to properly encrypting my NAS in the shed, I've been looking at encfs [arg0.net].

    • by UPZ (947916)

      Amazon Glacier [amazon.com] has really changed my backup strategy since this time last year

      Amazon is cheap but NSA will backup your data for free. Chances are that all your data is already being backed up as we speak.

      • by SpzToid (869795)

        While on the surface your backup suggestion seems valid, in reality one must also assess how realistic a successful recovery will be, for you, and at what cost to you.

  • by julian67 (1022593) on Sunday March 31, 2013 @12:53PM (#43325121)

    No need to do anything. When disaster strikes just wait three days and it simply restores itself. Shortly afterwards the data ascends into The Cloud and becomes available forever and ever. Halleluiah!

    • No need to do anything. When disaster strikes just wait three days and it simply restores itself. Shortly afterwards the data ascends into The Cloud and becomes available forever and ever. Halleluiah!

      I dunno. From what I hear, you can plead with it all you like after that, but it will only answer you if it feels like it.

  • finally started digitizing all my home videos (that include work documentation over the years too) to MP4 format. I have at least 100 tapes (8mm and miniDV). I import about 3-4 a day and then let FCP batch process them while I sleep. I can still edit them if I want, but I've already done that with the ones I want. Right now I just want to be able to skim through a 2hr video to find something without sticking the tape into the machine.

  • I never trusted "cloud" backups but recently I looked into Amazon Glacier - and now my personal backups are stored with "eleven nines" reliability, encrypted, and with price roughly 10 times lower than services such as Dropbox or Google Drive. No affiliation with Amazon... but the question was "how do you do it" so this is my answer.
  • ... we only have a few hours left before they will delete everything [youtube.com] !
    (grabs 3.5" floppy drive and starts downloading...)
  • I ran a backup to my local external HD yesterday, and today decided to do it again, this time with all my music and moving pictures. I'm also investigating how to use Duplicity on its own to backup my personal material to online places (such as Ubuntu One).

    Unfortunately the Deja Dup developers decided that profiles or similar, where you could define different types of backups, where too complicated for the program. I mean, they said it would complicate the program too much for end users.

    Ideally I want to ba

    • I don't know if it will work with brand-name services rather than just servers, but you might look into LuckyBackup, as it does allow the creation & scheduling of multiple backup profiles. Combining it with SpiderOak (the best free online live-versioning backup I can find) set to constantly back up select crucial files & associated autosave directories works extremely well for me.

  • I use a file server that uses RAID-Z2 to cover disk failures and daily backups to another partition to cover user failures. I snapshot the ZFS file systems and copy the snapshots to removable hard drives which are stored in a safe-deposit box at my bank to cover a site failure. I only offsite quarterly, but it is good enough for a home system. If my house burns down I will have more to worry about than 3 months of lost data.

    My physical and virtual machines use the file server for storage of important use
  • Spideroak for my most essential work related things, home backup for everything else.

    • Spideroak for my crucial working files along with local backup here, too; I find it's also helpful at times to have it back up the autosave/temp directories used when I work on them. I just wish that they'd come to their senses and offer a more reasonable pricing scheme -- a lot of users could use a few more GB for breathing room and would pay a few dollars each month (like ~$1/GB) for it, but will never come *close* to 100GB, let alone pay $100-120/year for the useless space, especially if our connection

  • by TeknoHog (164938) on Sunday March 31, 2013 @06:03PM (#43326839) Homepage Journal
    I embed the most important data in Bitcoin transactions, and let the geek world mirror the blockchain.
  • by rmstar (114746) on Sunday March 31, 2013 @06:30PM (#43326971)

    I use rdiff-backup [nongnu.org] on each of the machines I administer (my machines and those of my wife, at home and at work, plus laptops). rdiff-backup is nice because it saves the current snapshot as a directory that looks exactly like the one being backed up, so restoring stuff is really very trivial.

    The backup scripts run daily, backing up to the home directory of the user (a /home/$user/backups directory) so that casual deletion means at most a day of work lost. I rsync all those backup dirs weekly to one of three 1TB drives. They are about 60% full each.

    The three of them are rotated arround. One is next to me, one in the basement, and another in a drawer at my office. They get rotated every week.

    Seems pretty solid to me. A lot has to happen to leave me with a serious data loss.

  • I've never had a data disaster, but I still have a somewhat complex setup:
    1. Automatic filesystem (ZFS) snapshots every 15 min on my desktop (home, also used for work from home) and RAID to protect against HW failures.
    2. Unison (http://www.cis.upenn.edu/~bcpierce/unison/) sync between laptop and desktop keeps my home dir in two places (the important bits)
    3. Work files are synced to the organisation's system, and that's probably enough
    4. Rsync backup to external hard drive every ~3 days, drive is otherwise

  • If you don't back up, you'll have to start backing up to restore. If you do backup, you need to test your backups today. For the love of god don't just assume your stuff comes back out ok.

  • One local USB, one Network disk placed right by the exit in case I need to abandon ship in a hurry (Bushfire area). Backing up 1.3 terabytes twice consumes backup day. For the rest of the year I do incremental backups. Even if both backups were lost data could be recovered from the cloud.
  • I've had two data disasters over the years:

    1) In the early 90s, I was a teenager using a trusty Apple IIgs to write & edit my first full-length novel, first on 3.5" floppies and then a 20mb Seagate external hard drive. Two or three years into the project, when a summer of 6-8 hour days working on it had the first full rough draft 99% finished and partway into heavy restructuring/editing, I turned the IIgs on only to have it inform me there was no bootable disk. (I later learned that my mother had just

    • When I wrote my book http://dictatorshandbook.net/ [dictatorshandbook.net] I was using LaTeX on a Linux box, so in addition to regular (less-periodic) backups of the entire computer I put in place a system for backing up just the manuscript directory, as often as I wanted (usually at the end of a night of editing and writing). A USB key, a WebDAV directory, and an email account were all I needed, and here's the little Bash script I wrote to make it all work: http://www.therandymon.com/content/view/236/98/ [therandymon.com] This is one of the thi

    • I tell openOffice to use .fodt format. It's uncompressed.

  • I have spent quite some time last year, working on a disaster recovery plan for my company, and one thing I realised was, that of all the important things you have to do to be able to recover after a total wipe-out, back ups are actually the smallest. This is my list of priorities:

    1. People: we develop software, and it takes something like a whole year before a new developer is fully on top of their game. The sudden loss of even one of them would seriously hurt our ability to perform. How many could we surv

It is surely a great calamity for a human being to have no obsessions. - Robert Bly

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