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CompTIA Reneges, Reconsiders on Lifetime Certifications 245

Posted by kdawson
from the had-our-fingers-crossed dept.
garg0yle writes "Recently, it was reported that IT certification house CompTIA had changed their A+, Network+, and Security+ certifications — rather than being 'for life,' there would now be a recertification requirement through continuing-education credits (and an accompanying fee). Needless to say, this made a lot of people very unhappy, and today it was announced that CompTIA has reversed their decision. Basically, any certification obtained before 2011 will still be 'for life.'" Ars notes the coincidence that CompTIA contacted them about the change of heart an hour after Ars's story about CompTIA's initial switcheroo went live.
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CompTIA Reneges, Reconsiders on Lifetime Certifications

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  • CompTIA (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Lord Ender (156273) on Tuesday January 26, 2010 @03:44PM (#30908748) Homepage

    CompTIA certs are the community college diplomas of the IT certification industry. Who cares, unless you're going for an internship or level-1 helpdesk position?

    • Re:CompTIA (Score:5, Interesting)

      by johnlcallaway (165670) on Tuesday January 26, 2010 @03:50PM (#30908836)
      I agree. I had to take the CompTIA Linux certification several years ago to teach a class and thought it was odd that there was no re-certification requirement. I passed it the first try without too much studying, just taking the sample test and finding out where I needed to brush up. I didn't have to pay for it, so I really didn't think too much about it, it was just one of those things I had to do to make a little extra spending money.

      After I took it I found out that an NT guy with zero Linux experience passed it simply by studying for it.

      CompTIA certs only impress people who don't know anything, and are helpful to get you through the HR screening by pasting it on your resume.
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by TheRealFixer (552803)
        CompTIA certs only impress people who don't know anything, and are helpful to get you through the HR screening by pasting it on your resume.

        That accurately describes most college IT degrees, actually.
        • Re:CompTIA (Score:5, Insightful)

          by Attila Dimedici (1036002) on Tuesday January 26, 2010 @04:07PM (#30909064)

          CompTIA certs only impress people who don't know anything, and are helpful to get you through the HR screening by pasting it on your resume. That accurately describes most college IT degrees, actually.

          That accurately describes most college degrees, most of the time they are necessary to get past HR screening, but tell you nothing about the qualifications of the individual in question.

          • Re:CompTIA (Score:4, Insightful)

            by causality (777677) on Tuesday January 26, 2010 @04:30PM (#30909352)

            CompTIA certs only impress people who don't know anything, and are helpful to get you through the HR screening by pasting it on your resume. That accurately describes most college IT degrees, actually.

            That accurately describes most college degrees, most of the time they are necessary to get past HR screening, but tell you nothing about the qualifications of the individual in question.

            College is about having goals, meeting deadlines, and dealing well (i.e. obediently) with authority figures, your willingness to allow them to determine the use of your time, your ability to follow their detailed instructions, and your willingness to be a cog in a large institution. Those are the qualifications employers find desirable. They likely know that in this industry, a degree does not necessarily indicate skill or ability and that many of the most skilled developers and technicians never went to college. What they do know is that it demonstrates you are willing and able to jump through hoops of the sort that they find useful.

            • Re:CompTIA (Score:5, Insightful)

              by dcollins (135727) on Tuesday January 26, 2010 @04:52PM (#30909694) Homepage

              This is such horseshit. I found my time in college to be uniformly exciting and mind-expanding. I can't even imagine what kind of personality it takes to have never found a single college class be educational. It's like the whole "mentor/student" concept has a been a hideous gaffe for what, 4000 years?

              • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

                You are only partially right and the GP post is indeed very insightful. For most people, myself included, there were always the few very enticing intellectual "carrots" to offset the very many "sticks" in the academic environment. For every exciting subject, where I had a lot of fun and where I could indeed participate in a mentor/student dynamics with excellent professors, there were at least 5 "jump-through-the-hoops-and-keep-your-mouth-shut", compulsory, no opt-out, (and frankly utterly pointless) subjec

              • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

                by Korin43 (881732)
                Maybe you haven't been in college recently? My school's CS degree is incredibly boring because they want to make sure that any idiot can pass. There are two intro level classes taught in Java. By the end of the second one, you still use the ArrayList class for everything and the most "difficult" thing you do is write your own merge sort (the final assignment). For my current class apparently we're supposed to write a binary tree and a hash table at some point. In the next class (which I'm also in), we do si
              • Re:CompTIA (Score:5, Interesting)

                by infinite9 (319274) on Tuesday January 26, 2010 @05:24PM (#30910132)

                This is such horseshit. I found my time in college to be uniformly exciting and mind-expanding. I can't even imagine what kind of personality it takes to have never found a single college class be educational. It's like the whole "mentor/student" concept has a been a hideous gaffe for what, 4000 years?

                My university experience matches yours. My work experience matches the GP.

              • Re:CompTIA (Score:4, Interesting)

                by causality (777677) on Tuesday January 26, 2010 @05:38PM (#30910318)

                This is such horseshit.

                Without altering its meaning, this can be rephrased as, "my perspective is different from yours, therefore yours is horseshit." How nice, you've elected yourself the arbiter of validity on a matter of opinion.

                I found my time in college to be uniformly exciting and mind-expanding. I can't even imagine what kind of personality it takes to have never found a single college class be educational.

                I'm fond of the way Samuel Clemens summed it up: "I never allowed my schooling to interfere with my education." If you are able to pursue knowledge and understanding for its own sake, on your own when no one is looking, because it enriches your life, you have found a much purer guiding principle than appeasing a professor, making a grade, or obtaining a job. If you cannot do these things or cannot do them effectively outside of an institution and hierarchical authority structure, then what sort of student are you? If you can and are doing these things on your own and take personal responsibility for your own education, knowing that no one has your interests at heart quite like you do, then the only thing left to prove to any employer is that you are not too much of a wolf, that you can also play the sheep who can follow orders.

                It's like the whole "mentor/student" concept has a been a hideous gaffe for what, 4000 years?

                A decent mentor will teach you what he knows and will probably enjoy feeling like someone is dependent on their guidance. It's a common way of feeling self-important. A great mentor will show you that you are capable of teaching yourself and will equip you to be your own mentor.

              • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

                by Machtyn (759119)
                Either you were lucky or you didn't notice the hoops you had to jump through. I've been to two different colleges (Jr. College and a University) and, while I've appreciate the advisors, they were mostly unhelpful in getting me to the correct classes. That was a frustrating hoop I had to jump through. I had to deal with classes at odd times of the day, whether I enjoyed it is immaterial. I had to deal with inane professors that would rather be in their office designing whatever theory they were working o
              • College (Score:2, Interesting)

                by benjamindees (441808)

                I can't even imagine what kind of personality it takes to have never found a single college class be educational.

                Oh boy, I'll tell you exactly the type. It's the person who fucks up and attends a yokel school on full scholarship instead of signing away his soul borrowing hundreds of thousands of dollars to go to the ivy league, due to his family members being complete horses' asses unable to engage in any type of long-range planning whatsoever and unwilling to contribute to any kind of worthwhile education.

                It's the person who spends every class surrounded by jocks and precious minorities with the IQ's of eggplants, i

              • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

                My time is college was wonderful and educational and completely irrelevant to anything I have done since. The one job I had related to my degree, they could have taught someone out of high school to do with at most two more days of training over what they gave me. Most of my other jobs required that I have a Bachelor's Degree to get them, but nothing I learned in college was related to the job in any way.
              • by Monsuco (998964)

                This is such horseshit. I found my time in college to be uniformly exciting and mind-expanding. I can't even imagine what kind of personality it takes to have never found a single college class be educational.

                Basically anyone who dislikes fluff. I have no need for further math, science, or English, I've had that for 13 years in school. I just want the skills I need for IT. I don't need a stupid philosophy class.

            • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

              by oldhack (1037484)
              And getting laid. Oh, sorry, wrong room.
            • by tibman (623933)

              You could easily replace "College" with "The Army" in your description. But i don't think ex-Army guys with 4 years in are expected to be picked up as a techie making 50k US$. HR will still ask, what is your Degree in? oh, no degree, do you have x many years of experience? "Yeah, i'm a good shot"

              There has to be something else employers want with college graduates than what you listed.

            • Let me relate my university experience. I'm not 100% sure about US tertiary education terminology, maybe a Danish university is what you call College?

              College is about having goals

              Yes. My goals. Learning (about) Computer Science in order to become a better programmer. Getting straight A's on my exams. Learning the material.

              meeting deadlines

              Or asking kindly and slightly embarrassed for an extension, sometimes. You know, negotiate with the people who are dependent on your work (either for grading it or for linking with your code). Or, sometimes, ye

          • Re:CompTIA (Score:4, Informative)

            by jank1887 (815982) on Tuesday January 26, 2010 @04:41PM (#30909504)

            As an engineering major, I'll assume that I fit in to the exception to your 'most' qualifier.

        • Re:CompTIA (Score:5, Insightful)

          by Lord Ender (156273) on Tuesday January 26, 2010 @04:10PM (#30909104) Homepage

          In pursuit of my engineering degree, I learned useful things I would not have "discovered" on my own. I understand how things work under the hood. I also learned finance and communication skills.

          A diploma from a real college means something.

          (oh and I got to build robots!)

          • by jank1887 (815982)

            last i checked, Engineering wasn't considered IT.

            • by elnyka (803306)

              last i checked, Engineering wasn't considered IT.

              Well, most people can't tell the difference between EE, CS/Soft. Engineering or IT Computing. We are all IT, the "tech guys" you know?

      • I got my A+ a long time ago, because I was out of work and looking for another I.T. job, and figured "Why not? It's not real expensive to get compared to most of the certs. out there, and it's something else to put on my resume to show I'm still trying to keep up with things." As I recall, I was a little surprised it asked so many questions that related to old/obsolete computer systems. (EG. It had questions about which IRQ and I/O address was the default for COM1 and COM2. With anything resembling a "

      • by iamhassi (659463)
        "CompTIA certs only impress people who don't know anything, and are helpful to get you through the HR screening by pasting it on your resume."

        And who is checking these things? I've been putting A+ and Network+ on my resume for 10 yrs and no one has ever doubted me and, as far as I know, I've never lost a job because of it. I took the classes and found them to be dreadfully easy "this is ram, it goes in your computer..." or "this is a token ring [wikipedia.org], a form of network that's not often used". So I didn't f
    • What company do you recommend? Personally, I've found CompTIA certs a useful part of my portfolio of credentials. Not the only part, of course, but worth the money. I've heard people complain that all certifications are worthless, or some are, but I've never seen any evidence. Where's your evidence? Or is this less about evidence and more about polishing your knob?

      • by Lord Ender (156273) on Tuesday January 26, 2010 @04:06PM (#30909050) Homepage

        Certifications which mean something tend to vary by specialization. Cisco certifications mean something if you work in networking. GIAC or ISC2 certifications mean something if you work in security.

        CompTIA certifications don't command respect anywhere, except maybe to differentiate yourself from the other entry-level candidates with no experience. After your first job, mentioning your CompTIA cert is like talking about where you went to middle school. Who cares?

        • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

          by spun (1352)

          So, what? Leave them off entirely? It's been, oh, seven years since I last took a CompTIA cert. I feel old now. I've got five of the damn things, and a pile more other certs since then, so do you really recommend not mentioning them at all?

          And, dare I ask again, what are you basing this on? Not to be a dick, but without some kind of evidence, it sounds like you are playing little dominance heirarchy games, "look at me! I'm so much better than CompTIA certs, if you have them, what a loser!" So, seriously, b

      • Evidence is mostly anecdotal, but I bet you could find enough to justify an opinion that certs are worthless on the job; they're only helpful to get the interview.

        Thanks to braindumps people can just memorize the questions so you'll have MCSEs wondering why DHCP isn't working and they forgot to authorize the server.

        Only certs that mean anything are the ones that give you a practical situation and other people grading you, like the CCIEs.

        • by spun (1352) <loverevolutionary@yah o o .com> on Tuesday January 26, 2010 @04:24PM (#30909282) Journal

          Well, I don't give a great God damn how useful my certs are on my job. I already know I can do my job. I don't need a cert to prove that to myself. I thought the whole point of certs was to help get a foot in the door.

          • I thought the whole point of certs was to help get a foot in the door.

            Except people use their certs as an excuse for their idiocy. I've dealt with these people. "I'm an MCSE! I know what I'm doing!" and they clearly don't.

            So if you know your job more power to you. You're one of the few.

          • by tibman (623933)

            The point of a cert is the certify (prove) that you completely understand the identified topic. BTW you sound really angry about these cert things. If they helped you then great. But most people look at it not from the "getting a job" perspective but an educational one. Some people want something to use them as a bullet on a resume', some people want to tackle/master a given subject. If you don't care about your resume' then obviously a lot of these certs would look useless and a waste of time/money.

        • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

          by bdmorgan (805289)

          Thanks to braindumps people can just memorize the questions so you'll have MCSEs wondering why DHCP isn't working and they forgot to authorize the server.

          Thanks, man. I've been fighting with this DHCP issue for, like, three weeks now.

    • by ajlisows (768780)

      To some extent, yes, but I think the A+ is a nice little course....or at least it was a decade or so ago when I took it.

      Learning about the history of processors and such is good. You get to start with primitive 8086 (possibly earlier...I don't remember) level chips and see how and why they progressed to the levels that they are today. A lot of people I know who are "Computer Technicians" or "Network Admins" are sorely deficient in their knowledge of what is going on with hardware, what a bus is, what the

  • by cptnapalm (120276) on Tuesday January 26, 2010 @03:48PM (#30908804)

    I got my A+ about a decade ago. Tech bubble burst and I couldn't get a job doing A+ work around here. Then I didn't own a computer for a few years and I haven't done anything with Windows in years at this point. They probably ought to de-certify me, quite frankly. On the other hand, I'm not applying for any A+ jobs anymore, so I suppose the question, in my case, is moot.

    • by jank1887 (815982)

      but the key is that you could. with lifetime certs, I'd hope any employer would ask for certificate and date earned. that would indicate something if there was no intervening work, training, or schooling related to the cert.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by fm6 (162816)

      The very concept of a lifetime certification is lame. I used to be something of an expert on Unix system administration — there's even a widely book on the subject that acknowledges me as a source. But that was almost 30 years ago, I haven't kept up with the topic (especially networking), and even newbie Linux geeks know more about it than I do.

      If I applied for a Unix or Linux sysadmin job, they'd ask me a few key questions and then laugh me out of the office. Any smart employer (which is, admittedly

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Deosyne (92713)

        For most certs, I would agree, but the A+ is a joke. Actually, that's not fair; the A+ is a capability exam, like if you can pass the A+ then I'd be willing to interview you for an IT position as help desk or something else entry-level. Passing the A+ shows that you have the ability and the willingness to learn things about tech. I'd still expect you to have the skills that I put in the ad for the position, but personal experience and practice may be perfectly suitable.

        More advanced positions, on the other

  • by Spittoon (64395) on Tuesday January 26, 2010 @03:49PM (#30908816) Homepage
    If the certifying authority doesn't require renewals, or some sort of ongoing training in order to stay certified, then the hiring managers will/should start requiring it. "When did you get your certification? What have you done since then to maintain your current knowledge of the field?" IT isn't like Ancient Literature. What you know today will likely be obsolete tomorrow, and any body that wants to certify qualifications in such a changing environment needs to take that into account. Sounds like they wanted to realize that, but people who just wanted a meaningless cert on their CV wouldn't let them do it.
    • by Bios_Hakr (68586)

      No one other than an intern gets hired off of a simple certification.

      The general progression is that you get a cert and find work in the field. Then, you have two sections on your resume; certifications and experience.

      If someone has a CCNA and 4 years working on switches and routers, why should he go back and take the CCNA again? Just so he can verify he knows RIP or CIDR? Two or three simple questions can determine that at interview time.

      The people who work in IT generally stay up on current tech better

    • IT isn't like Ancient Literature.

      I dunno. Have you ever taken a peek at some JCL or COBOL card decks?

      Sanskrit, Hieroglyphics and Cuneiform programmers are still around.

      I haven't seen an SNA critter around these parts in a long time, though.

  • The first thing you do to prepare for a CompTIA test is forget everything you know about computers. Memorize vague and even incorrect answers. Sit in front of a 10 year old CRT that you can feel and see humming. Pass the test. Get a paper certification in the mail a month later and throw it in the safe next to other certs and college degrees... I don't think I would like doing the CompTIA's over again, so I won't.
  • by jollyreaper (513215) on Tuesday January 26, 2010 @04:00PM (#30908964)

    Certs already have a natural shelf life. Stuff like A+ and Security+ get you in the industry's door. Microsoft certs naturally expire as new products come out. You don't have to say MCSE NT is expired, employers will ask you for your MCSE 2008. And of course you'll try to explain to them that there's no MCSE anymore, it's an MCITP and they'll say "Yeah, well you go and get your MCSE 2008 and get back to us."

    • Agreed, with one small caveat:

      I haven't had to bother with any sort of Microsoft certification since I got (courtesy of a way-previous employer) the Windows 2000 MCSE knocked-out... in 2001. I still have an ancient Exchange 5.5 MCP loafing around in my file cabinet at home, though I just finished building an enterprise-grade Exchange 2007 infrastructure from scratch. When it comes to *nix? I usually just ask them for a sandboxed shell prompt and/or ask them where their test is so I can get it out of the way

  • In other words (Score:5, Insightful)

    by natehoy (1608657) on Tuesday January 26, 2010 @04:00PM (#30908976) Journal

    They have taken this policy change and turned it into an advertisement.

    "If you act THIS YEAR, your certification will be good FOR LIFE! Act NOW!"

    They can imply that certifications earned this year will have more value than certifications earned after 1 Jan 2011, because the ones earned this year never expire. Neither cert will be worth bupkus a year after it's granted, but one that never expires probably feels more valuable than one that does, even if the actual knowledge really does expire.

  • wow (Score:3, Interesting)

    by majortom1981 (949402) on Tuesday January 26, 2010 @04:01PM (#30908978)
    Here in NY the degrees acan include the cisco cert classes. So, besides learning the tech you learn business skills and other things that you don't learn in a cert course.
  • Experience (Score:2, Informative)

    by SirBigSpur (1677306)
    I have always considered experience more important than CompTIA certs. Not to take away from the ability to get these certifications but I found the 3 years of IT experience in internships I had accumulated before graduating with my BS in CIS to be a more valuable asset.
  • by Tmack (593755) on Tuesday January 26, 2010 @04:03PM (#30909012) Homepage Journal
    W00! this means my A+ from 1995 is still good! Im gona make mad $$ since I know how to boot DOS and unplug keyboards and monitors... I even know how to install a 386sx and 30pin simms!

    (not really, Im lame cause I never got my A+, just a job as a sysadmin)

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Just pulled out my A+ card dated 4/7/98.
      Still valid.
      And yes the test I took was on DOS/Win 3.1.

      (In 1998 they still didn't have the Windows 95 test available).

  • by idontgno (624372) on Tuesday January 26, 2010 @04:17PM (#30909192) Journal

    It used to be that CompTIA's cert never needed renewal.

    Then someone realized that a "lifetime" technology certification is as valuable as 25-year-old bread, CompTIA changed to say you'd need re-certification periodically.

    But, of course, that didn't fly with the armies of A+ drones who paid good money for their "lifetime" certification.

    CompTIA's new position is, once again, the A+ is good for "lifetime". However, they're sticking to the position that technology moves too fast for an old cert to be still good.

    The compromise position? Once enough time and progress has elapsed since your cert was issued, CompTIA's elite certification ninja team assassinates you. Your cert was, therefore, good for your "lifetime".

  • by ErichTheRed (39327) on Tuesday January 26, 2010 @04:24PM (#30909278)

    Being a Windows systems guy, I've kept my Microsoft certifications current over the years. (Say what you will...it gets you past the first resume filter if you ever find yourself in need of a job.) Back when the NT 4.0 certifications were rolling over into the Win2K versions, Microsoft introduced the concept of an expiring cert. Personally, I think part of this was due to the fact that Microsoft significantly increased the difficulty level of the Win2K exams to reduce piracy and try to revalue the credential.

    People who had the NT 4.0 certifications freaked, saying that Microsoft had no right to invalidate their credentials. Microsoft reversed the decision, and made the certifications last as long as support for the product did. They still stop offering exams for new people, but people who have the cert keep it.

    Does this matter? In my mind, no way. I can think of only one place NT 4.0 skills might be valuable today, and it involves embedded systems with no typical Windows user interface. (The New York subway system uses NT 4 for their fare collection machines.) Most places aren't using it for the general file-and-print server work that the certification was aimed at.

    I think it's just the perception of value. Even in 2010, there are a lot of people paying certification mills...I mean, training schools...many thousands of dollars for certification classes so they can "break into the lucrative field of IT." Community colleges regularly integrate the A+, Microsoft and Cisco cert classes into their degree programs. Some of those thousands of dollars are still being paid for long after the cert is achieved. People just don't want to feel they're holding worthless paper. In reality though, things change way too fast to declare that someone is "certified for life" on PC hardware. I find that if I take a couple months to focus on some piece of software, I turn around and hardware platforms have completely changed while I wasn't looking. Imagine an A+ cert holder from 1995 put in front of a quad-core machine with SAS drives, a huge video card that's basically a mini-computer, and other interfaces that didn't even exist in 1995.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by jollyreaper (513215)

      I think it's just the perception of value. Even in 2010, there are a lot of people paying certification mills...I mean, training schools...many thousands of dollars for certification classes so they can "break into the lucrative field of IT." Community colleges regularly integrate the A+, Microsoft and Cisco cert classes into their degree programs. Some of those thousands of dollars are still being paid for long after the cert is achieved. People just don't want to feel they're holding worthless paper. In reality though, things change way too fast to declare that someone is "certified for life" on PC hardware. I find that if I take a couple months to focus on some piece of software, I turn around and hardware platforms have completely changed while I wasn't looking. Imagine an A+ cert holder from 1995 put in front of a quad-core machine with SAS drives, a huge video card that's basically a mini-computer, and other interfaces that didn't even exist in 1995.

      A doctor takes continuing education credits to keep up with the field but this doesn't mean his undergraduate degree expires. For anyone doing IT, the A+ knowledge will be kept current by being in the field. And for specific newer tech, there are certs to get up to speed on that. The VMware stuff is getting really hot right now, for example. A previous employer paid for A+. The class itself was a very thorough review of the PC from soup to nuts. It would help bring a young amateur up to speed in the field.

      • by BitZtream (692029)

        A doctor takes continuing education credits to keep up with the field but this doesn't mean his undergraduate degree expires.

        Without continuing education their board certification will be revoked and they will no longer be licensed to practice on anything living. So while the undergrad degree may go away, its rather worthless in general when you tell someone you used to be a doctor but you didn't bother keeping up with modern medicine so you can't do anything anymore.

    • Which is why, at the end of the day, for a lot of IT topics, the only reasonable measure of competency is experience. I have no certifications, but I've put together heterogeneous networks of Windows and *nix boxes over LANs and VPNs, built iptables routers, swapped out damned near everything right down to the motherboard, pulled paper jammed into places in printers that one wouldn't think it possible to even get paper into, programmed in various languages, and am now into the wondrous world of virtualizat

    • by Spad (470073)

      I can think of only one place NT 4.0 skills might be valuable today

      Come work in the NHS, where many trusts still run NT4 domains and Exchange 5.5...I really, really wish I was joking.

    • by BitZtream (692029)

      significantly increased the difficulty level of the Win2K exams to reduce piracy

      You have GOT to explain how you came to this conclusion ...

  • A+ (Score:2, Interesting)

    by DarkofPeace (1672314)
    Well looking at many entry level job positions, many still require A+ certification. I agree that if you want a job higher up the tech food chain, A+ is worthless, but then again, thats not what its designed for.
  • I work as a contractor for a defense agency. Part of the requirements to work here include getting an A+ and/or Network+ and a Security+ cert. If I get deeper in this, I'll have to get a CISSP. Just more hoops to jump through to keep my job.

  • OK, I'm retired now and my job as an IBM FE, did require me to have certain certs as part of my job, but (IMHO) the single most useless and easy to get cert was the A+.

  • The certification industry is just a big kick back to m$ and others most of questions have little to do the real world and some of the M$ seem to live in a world of there own software being free and the kinds of setups they have cost to much for many places to have.

  • Just because you have a computer science degree doesnt mean you know how to fix a computer. Memorization is not glamorous but a technician who knows his s--t by heart
    is a better tech than someone who is winging it. When I went to get my current job, yes having an a+ certification distinguished me from the warm bodies
    that were applying for the job. An a+ cert is the difference between $7.50 an hour working as a stock boy vs $12-15 an hour + benefits working as a full time tech.

    No the a+ is not for 100k job a

  • My CompTIA Certification Story

    I got my CompTIA A+ [comptia.org] certification working as a repair technician in Computer City (defunct now) in 1999. Their two tests were pretty good at determining if you had basic skills to be junior computer repair technician. Their test was valued by employers who wanted some kind of a basic measure of people who did not have a college diploma or a vocational certification from DeVry to determine if they should even bother interviewing you for basic computer support jobs in repair or

    • by BitZtream (692029)

      I hate to break it to you, but both are irrelevant to anyone with a clue, which includes almost everyone outside of HR and upper/ignorant management.

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