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How-Not-to-Hire-U.S.-Workers Law Firm Fires Back 462

Posted by Zonk
from the those-rascally-scamps dept.
theodp writes "Congress is now calling for a Dept. of Labor investigation into a Pittsburgh law firm after a video showing its attorneys advising employers how to game the immigration system was posted on YouTube. Cohen & Grigsby, the firm in question, issued a statement insisting their statements were commandeered and misused, but would not allow CBS to view the original video in its entirety. Cohen & Grigsby has also been advising employers since 2002 that they have nothing to fear if they keep employees in the dark about the existence of DOL-required H-1B Public Access Files."
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How-Not-to-Hire-U.S.-Workers Law Firm Fires Back

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  • their website (Score:5, Insightful)

    by squarefish (561836) * on Saturday June 23, 2007 @01:35PM (#19621037)
    has the tag line 'progressive law' all over the place. I would suggest replacing the word 'progressive' with 'breakin' the'
    • Re:their website (Score:5, Informative)

      by Amiga Trombone (592952) on Saturday June 23, 2007 @02:06PM (#19621327)
      has the tag line 'progressive law' all over the place. I would suggest replacing the word 'progressive' with 'breakin' the'

      Call them up and express your displeasure...

      Main office:
      Pittsburgh, PA
      11 Stanwix Street
      15th Floor
      Pittsburgh, PA 15222-1319
      TEL: 412.297.4900
      FAX: 412.209.0672
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by PatPending (953482)
        The email address of Allan TeDesco, Chief Operating Officier is: atedesco@cohenlaw.com
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by dattaway (3088)
        Call them up and express your displeasure...

        Complaints work! but...

        Why call the lawyers? I'm going through the paper and WRITING the employers. My current drafts are rather rough and abrasive, but I expect the tone and clarity to improve over the weeks. I'd imagine some HR managers who are fed up with the system might take the bait. The former HR manager at my company got fired for openly venting about these complaints and admitting part of the problem.
  • Moot (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Colin Smith (2679) on Saturday June 23, 2007 @01:40PM (#19621097)
    If the dollar continues to fall as it has over the last few years.

     
    • Re:Moot (Score:5, Funny)

      by flyingfsck (986395) on Saturday June 23, 2007 @01:55PM (#19621225)
      Yup, pretty soon Americans will be sneaking across the border into Mexico to find work...
      • Re:Moot (Score:5, Funny)

        by Sj0 (472011) on Saturday June 23, 2007 @04:58PM (#19622767) Homepage Journal
        You laugh, but the US dollar really is in trouble. It's a short 4-5 cents before the Canadian dollar is above the US dollar, for the first time in 30 years. At the rate we're going(In 1992 the canadian dollar was 30 cents lower than the US dollar), our companies really will be hiring illegal American immigrants.

        Actually, I love that thought. I want to hire one of you to be my maid.

        "Mr. Smith, if you want to live in a country, you'd better learn how to write in our language. If I see ONE MORE "color", or "honor", or even a "gray" in my paperwork, I'm sending you back to your home country, where you can die in poverty. Do I make myself clear?"
        • Re:Moot (Score:5, Interesting)

          by magarity (164372) on Saturday June 23, 2007 @07:03PM (#19623709)
          You laugh, but the US dollar really is in trouble. It's a short 4-5 cents before the Canadian dollar is above the US dollar
           
          You must be an importer. For everyone who wants to export goods, or compete against imported goods, or sell stuff (and services) to foreign tourists, sell stuff to domestic tourists who decided not to go to more expensive other countries, etc, a low dollar against other currencies are a GOOD thing.
           
          All those dollars (note: dollars, not debt instruments - that's another discussion) held by people in other countries can only do ONE THING in the long run: Come back to the USA and buy something from here. A low dollar is just going to *finally* reverse the flood of US dollars out of the country to the mideast oil producers and Chinese factory owners. It's about time.
          • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

            by Copid (137416)
            Thank you for pointing this out. The idea that the dollar should always be strong relative to every other country's currency may sound good if you don't think about it, but it's really not any more sensible than claiming that the the price of walking shoes should always be higher than the price of running shoes. The reality is that the dollar will (and should) fluctuate to reflect the relative supply and demand of goods across borders. On one hand, people complain about the Chinese throwing our trade bal
          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            by Grishnakh (216268)
            It sounds like you don't know much about economics. Maybe you just haven't thought much about this.

            A strong dollar means lots of stuff can be imported. Maybe that's bad for you if you're trying to export some cheap crap, or sell to tourists, but it's good for everyone else. Your model works well in 3rd-world countries with good tourism economies, like various Caribbean islands. It doesn't work for an economic superpower. Have you noticed that western Europe has an extremely high standard of living, yet
    • by faragon (789704)
      Taking into consideration the US average Joe debt, a weak currency may be a way for reducing its nightmares, as inflation is the way to shrink his pain (debt), while deflation would degrade badly the economy. Is it time for two digit US dollar inflation?
  • by davidwr (791652) on Saturday June 23, 2007 @01:41PM (#19621103) Homepage Journal
    If you are going to evade the spirit of the law, don't be surprised when the lawmakers take note.
  • by antifoidulus (807088) on Saturday June 23, 2007 @01:47PM (#19621145) Homepage Journal
    they should be forced to give their jobs to low paid H1B workers.
    • Geez, think about what you're saying. The seminar is about the process of getting green cards for H1b workers. Why would companies get their supposedly "low paid" H1b workers green cards, if those workers could just pack up and leave as soon as the green card comes through? The fact that a company is trying to get a green card for one of their workers tells you that they are competitively paid.

      So, why don't they want any applicants in response to the job postings? Because most of these companies are cons
  • Shameful (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday June 23, 2007 @01:48PM (#19621151)
    This entire system is broken and should be scrapped. The government simply cannot enforce the restrictions in place. The H-1B is supposed to be a temp visa for positions that can't be filled domestically, but I see very few people using it that way. The sponsoring companies are using it as a means to keep labor costs down, and the visa holders seem to mostly be using it as a stepping stone to citizenship(the ones I know are). You should just accept this and roll the visa into a citizen-track visa, make it easy for visa holders to bring their families, make it easy for them to switch jobs, and then they won't have to worry about getting booted out of the country if they lose their job.
    • Re:Shameful (Score:5, Informative)

      by squarefish (561836) * on Saturday June 23, 2007 @02:22PM (#19621473)
      the visa holders seem to mostly be using it as a stepping stone to citizenship
       
      I don't think your sentiment is correct. I only know two people working here in the US on H-1B visas: one is from India and he's here for the short term to make money and send it home. He intends on permanently moving back to India, getting married, and settling down to raise a family in the next few years.

      The other has been working in the US for over 15 years, has been married to a US citizen for 6 and has a 5 yo son with dual citizenship, and has no intention of becoming a US citizen because it's just too much of a pain in the ass and not worth it to him.
       
      They are both honest people earing a living here for different reasons and purposes, but neither of them are doing so with the intent of citizenship or anything that comes close to what this law firm is trying to promote. I think the folks that get scooped in via a firm like this are the ones getting really screwed. The firm is doing this for the benefit of their clients, big companies, and they couldn't give a fuck about the H-1B worker at all.
       
      Hopefully the government will actually do something about this. I hope this firm and their practices will help magnify the hypocrasy and stupidity of the current immigration debate.
      • by CastrTroy (595695)
        Firstly, your sample size of 2 isn't very big. Also, H-1B is supposed to be for jobs that could not be filled with American applicants. Seems to me that they are pretty lenient on this. I'm just a Canadian, so I'm not completely filled in on this, but it seems that they are hiring H-1B's to do the job when they can't find an American to do the job for little enough money.
    • by tgatliff (311583)
      Employers are only doing this so that they can get lower cost labor. The easist way to fix it is to require them to pay equal pay to all workers and not pay someone lower just because they do not have a green card. Also, allow the immigrant the right to sue for this fair wage. To allow it to pass, just grandfather clause the existing workers. That would end this abuse over night because there would be no more reason to game the system anymore.
      • Employers are only doing this so that they can get lower cost labor.

        The lawyer is talking about getting green cards for foreign workers.

        The easist way to fix it is to require them to pay equal pay to all workers and not pay someone lower just because they do not have a green card.

        The easy way to fix this is to RTFA. These "fake ads" are being posted as part of the green card application process; the companies are trying to get their H1b workers green cards!

        So, why don't they want any real applicants? Beca
        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          Go read the fine article yourself. Given a pool of 50 applicants, even if they're good applicants, the odds that any one applicant fulfills all the requirements exactly is low: there is a serious art to writing job ads that eliminate all but the previously selected candidate. This practice occurs in the managerial and corporate realm every day, to avoid any but the already selected candidate.

          If you watch the video, the attorneys make clear that the employer can make interviews with any US applicants that ru
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by cdrguru (88047)
        That law is already in place. Maybe not enforced very well, but that specific law is here already.

        What the H-1B worker gets you is someone that can't switch jobs. They need a sponsoring employer and have about two weeks to leave the country if they lose that sponsoring employer that brought them in. Switching sponsors isn't trivial. So you have a worker that can't quit and unless they want to return to the armpit of a place they came from, they will do what they are told and keep their mouth shut.

        This h
        • What the H-1B worker gets you is someone that can't switch jobs.

          That used to be true but isn't anymore. H1b workers can switch jobs quite easily.

          But you're missing something more basic: the lawyer in the video isn't talking about H1b applications, he's talking about green card applications.

          This has little to do with wages and everything to do with worker "loyalty."

          In principle, the argument that enforced loyalty can lead to depressed wages is correct; the problem with the argument is simply that most legal
        • Re:Shameful (Score:4, Informative)

          by jmauro (32523) on Saturday June 23, 2007 @05:25PM (#19622949)
          You're thinking of the H2 visa on the switching jobs thing. The H1 and H1B immigrants can switch jobs.
        • There is a fix. (Score:3, Interesting)

          by tkrotchko (124118) *
          "This has little to do with wages and everything to do with worker "loyalty.""

          Well, it's a bit of both.

          The idea is that the loyalty of the H1-B is enforced by the the U.S. Government. If you're not loyal, you get thrown out of the country. That probably makes you pretty loyal.

          But the purpose of forcing such loyalty is that it allows the employer to pay less money. If the prevailing wage $60K per year, I'm guessing you can get by with $35K per year for the H1B, plus they're technically temps, so you don't
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Copid (137416)

        Employers are only doing this so that they can get lower cost labor. The easist way to fix it is to require them to pay equal pay to all workers and not pay someone lower just because they do not have a green card. Also, allow the immigrant the right to sue for this fair wage. To allow it to pass, just grandfather clause the existing workers. That would end this abuse over night because there would be no more reason to game the system anymore.

        In theory, they're already supposed to be paying competitive wa

    • If they are on a citizenship track, and unable to be booted out of the country if they report their employer for something or switch to a better job, then they will be able to demand more pay. That will reduce the number of them while increasing the quality.

      Slaves are not good for the future of our country.
    • by erroneus (253617)
      Damn right it's shameful.

      There used to be a "marked decided control" over the cost of labor. IT spending got huge in the Dot-COM boom and it freaked business execs out. Dot-COM is over but now we're left with the results of some 'clever solutions' laying around that won't go away.
    • Why wouldn't we want skilled, educated, hard-working, people from other countries to come here and become citizens? Doesn't that improve the value of our republic? They pay taxes, do honest work, raise families...how are they any different from our Grandfathers, Great Grandmothers, or even farther back who came to the US looking for a better life? Do we have more a right to happiness than they, just because they weren't born here?

      However, foreign workers who intend to go back and send the majority of the
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by p0tat03 (985078)

      While it's commendable that you have concern for the well-being of America and its work force, I think you've got it wrong.

      I am Canadian, and while I'm currently working in Canada, I will jump on an H-1B opportunity from a nice job instantly.

      The removal of H-1B's will partially deal with the abusive companies who use said visas as ways to hire cheap foreign labour. But honestly, there are enough *perfectly legal* new immigrants in your country for companies to do that anyway. No, unfortunately removing

  • I wish. (Score:4, Insightful)

    by TheGeneration (228855) on Saturday June 23, 2007 @01:54PM (#19621217) Journal
    I wish the courts had the power to force a man to work a minimum wage job when he is found doing such unethical work. The only way this would work would be if the courts were to take all of the mans other income as a fine as well. I want these people to see the life they are damning the rest of the country to.
  • by SpinyNorman (33776) on Saturday June 23, 2007 @01:55PM (#19621237)
    Talk to ANYBODY who has got a green card thru their company (assuming they were reasonably cognisent of the process) and you will discover the same thing - this is standard operating procedure, and not just an abuse by this specific law firm.

    The way the system is set up, how can it be any other way... if a company has decided they want to get someone a green card, then of course they do whatever they can to achieve that. If they instead wanted to replace the person with a US worker then they'd be doing an honest job search, and NOT pursing a green card. Duh! The law says you have to advertize the job, so you put an ad for the job in the most obscure paper possible, with the job requirements so custom tailored to the person you are trying to get a green card for that no one else can qualify. I'm sure it works better than ever in recent years now that most people expect to find job openings online rather than in the local paper.

    What's lame here is Congress pretending to give a crap (presumably just because this particular story/video has hit the press) and wanting to investigate this particular law firm. One has to wonder are they being investigated for breaking the law, or rather just for making Congress look bad by openly flaunting the law? If Congress really gave a crap they'd fix the broken system rather than go after a law firm doing nothing different than every other law firm hired to assist in this process.
    • f a company has decided they want to get someone a green card, then of course they do whatever they can to achieve that. If they instead wanted to replace the person with a US worker then they'd be doing an honest job search, and NOT pursing a green card.

      And what's wrong with that? When the green card process is over, the company has a US worker. The only reason for going through the extra expense and delay of the green card process is because they think that the person they are sponsoring for a green car
    • by Wansu (846) on Saturday June 23, 2007 @03:33PM (#19622081)

      ... this is standard operating procedure, and not just an abuse by this specific law firm.

      You're right. This has been going on since the inception of the H1-B program. In 1990, I watched a parade of US citizens interviewing where I worked for an engineering job opening later filled by an H1-B. The opening had also been posted to a bulletin board there with a salary that was about $10k less than a US citizen fresh out of engineering school would have made. Management was annoyed at having to jump through these hoops to obtain the cheap labor.

      What is new here is the YouTube factor. The lawyer isn't really sorry his comments were commandeered. He's sorry he and the others got busted on YouTube. This film is an outrage, as is the H1-B program. It takes a film like this to cause a stink. Too bad we didn't have YouTube 17 years ago.

  • I would sue that employee frontwards and backwards.
  • Paris (Score:2, Funny)

    by Elsapotk421 (1097205)
    Is this the equivalent of a sex tape for a law firm?
  • by Hognoxious (631665) on Saturday June 23, 2007 @02:01PM (#19621287) Homepage Journal
    First, let's outsource all the lawyers.
  • by Frosty Piss (770223) on Saturday June 23, 2007 @02:04PM (#19621313)
    If Homeland Security has it's way, get ready for just about everything we consume, from produce to fast food, to home prices, everything will go sky-high. The fact is, there are a lot of things that we require for our "standard of living" that we Americans are not willing to do for what employers can pay.

    Second issue: Do "illegals" really want to stay in this country? Here in Washington State, that's not the case. Many "illegals" make reasonably good money here for hard work, and send it home, where they will eventually retire, in a place where money is worth more than it is here. Not all "illegals" intend to stay, and very, very, very few take any jobs away from "Americans". When people talk about "immigration problems", most are not talking about High Tech jobs.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by cdrguru (88047)
      True, we're not talking about high tech jobs.

      But we have an economy that is now structured around paying people to stay poor and artifically low prices that distort everything, including wages paid to high tech workers.

      Let's imagine a case where all the illegals either (a) walked home or (b) demanded the prevailing wage that a legal worker would get. McDonalds and Wendy's would have to charge more. Their people would get paid more. These people could then afford to pay more for rent and maybe apartment b
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by homer_s (799572)
        McDonalds and Wendy's would have to charge more. Their people would get paid more.

        You are making a common mistake.
        Everyone understands that "If company A raises prices, people would go to company B".
        But for some reason everyone assumes that if the *entire industry* raises prices, people would just pay up.
        That is not true - if *industry A* raises prices, people will look for alternatives.

        So, if McDonalds and Wendy's would have to charge more, people would look for alternatives - packing lunch fro
    • by rossz (67331)
      This has nothing to do with illegal aliens. This is about importing skilled workers instead of hiring citizens. On average, H1B workers make about 25% less than the equivalent citizen. But there's more to it than just pay. They can get a person with a higher degree, which means the pay discrepancy is even worse. Also, H1B workers tend to not "rock the boat" when it comes to labor law violations.

      I'm not against immigration. Hell, this country was built on immigrants. I want the foreign workers to come
  • I want these guys around to advise my competition! In fact, I hope every company I might ever
    compete with, goes out and hires these guys to help them hire as many "low-bid" workers as they can.

    Meanwhile, I'll focus on hiring the best workers possible, regardless of where they are from, and eventually run
    these other guys out of business anyway.
    • by Kostya (1146)
      I'd agree with you except that's a lot (and I do mean a lot) of US workers getting screwed. You can't possibly hire them all.

      There was a comment in one of the articles about this where the lawyer said he didn't know how common this was. Considering that three past employers of mine did it (who knows how many I didn't know about), I'd say it is pretty darn common. There is a lot of work that US workers aren't even given a chance to apply for because the company has already decided to fill it with an H1-B.
    • by megaditto (982598)
      Meanwhile, I'll focus on hiring the best workers possible, regardless of where they are from, and eventually run
      these other guys out of business anyway.


      What if that 'best worker possible' is a foreigner? You'd still need to do what this law firm did: show that no Joe Blow with a C+ average and VB.net 'experience' is able to do the job.
    • The "best qualified" workers are probably the guys looking for green cards - otherwise, why would HR go through all this rigmarole to keep them hired? It's not even like they're paying these immigrant employees less, because if that was the case they could just post ads openly and know that no American would be willing to work for the advertised salary.

      IANAL, but it sounds like the law requires them to hire any American applicant who is QUALIFIED, not preferable. So these companies are afraid they're going
    • Unless you're going to make an appeal to racism, there's no reason to believe the immigrant employee isn't more qualified, especially since the employer is willing to go to so much trouble to hire them.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday June 23, 2007 @02:05PM (#19621317)
    One of the earliest discussions of this video was on dice.com, and several people downloaded it before it got pulled. And they made certain that it was sent to the Programmer's Guild as well as Loub Dobbs, and other media outlets.

    However, dice.com has initiated a censorship campaign against certain posters and postings against H1-B visas. It's not clear if this is approved by management, or it's the random act of a few moderators. What is clear is that requests for this to stop, and for clarification of Dice's censorship policy have been deleted as well.

    Add to this Dice's postings of standard pro-H1B visa propaganda, and it's very clear that Dice is in full support of the H1-B visa program.

    This is odd for a job board which seeks the best talent in the U.S., but I guess it's the H1-B shops which are paying Dice's bills.

    So until this censorship and propaganda campaign ends, I am taking by business elsewhere. I urge others who seek new jobs to do the same.
  • America is now a country of middle managers, having outsourced so much of the actual work to other countries. At some point they will realize how little they need you and cut their ties. You'll notice the massive tumble the dollar has taken in the last 6 years. The corporatiosn are bribing your government to legislate yourselves into insignifigance.

    This obssesive focus on short term gains that your culture and stock set up encourages will ultimately be severely detrimental to America. Someone should wise up
    • by rhakka (224319)
      Why?

      If you actually want a just and fair world, america will NEED to roll back in terms of consumption and power eventually. We certainly can't raise the world to our standard. The other option... eventually... is our slide to some middle level.

      But with ANY globalization.. corporate- or citizen-based... eventually we'll be at fairly level playing fields; neither markets nor citizens will allow for a massive differential indefinitely. That playing field must be at a level lower than the "american field" i
  • by Tatisimo (1061320) on Saturday June 23, 2007 @02:09PM (#19621359)
    First fruit picking robots, then this. I suggest companies start developing robots to take over the lawyer's jobs. Then the robot lawyers could start telling employees how to cheat the system into somehow unethically profiting off their robotic workers (pirated software on them, maybe?). Then, seeing how corrupt employees are, replace them with robots, leaving us humans to enjoy life.
  • Tip of the Iceberg (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Esion Modnar (632431) on Saturday June 23, 2007 @02:15PM (#19621409)
    Or... when you see one cockroach... This is what we all suspect goes on behind closed doors, and why many of us have a basic dislike of the corporate "suits." Let these assholes be the first against the wall.

    And for those of you bitching about how us Americans don't have any more right to a job than anybody else, suck it. Every country has a responsibility to give first priority to the employment and prosperity of its own TAX PAYING citizens. America is no exception. Any company, from any country, found acting in bad faith with the government and its citizens, should be dealt with very harshly.

  • by rueger (210566) * on Saturday June 23, 2007 @02:15PM (#19621417) Homepage
    I have no reason to doubt that these lawyers keep their clients within the law, however much they might "game the system." That, after all, is why you hire a lawyer.

    The job of the lawyer is to know the law inside out so that they can assist their client. The job of the legislator is to draft laws and regulations that have as few loopholes and weaknesses as possible.

    If blame is to be assigned, it goes to the lawmakers.

    Honestly though I suspect that most companies paying for this kind of advice are probably fooling themselves. Between the falling U.S. dollar, legal costs, and the inefficiencies associated with training and replacing short term or contract employees they likely aren't saving enough money to make it worthwhile.

    Just because it looks cheap doesn't mean it really saves you money.
    • by Rich0 (548339)
      The job of the lawyer is to know the law inside out so that they can assist their client. The job of the legislator is to draft laws and regulations that have as few loopholes and weaknesses as possible.

      If blame is to be assigned, it goes to the lawmakers.


      The law shouldn't be about some cat-and-mouse game to find and close loopholes. It should be about legislating what most citizens would consider right and wrong.

      Courts should (and might already) find that willful sidestepping around the intent of a law is
  • the way it works (Score:3, Interesting)

    by idlake (850372) on Saturday June 23, 2007 @02:16PM (#19621427)
    The companies I have worked for have looked for the best educated and qualified applicants. They post on mailing lists, network, and find people through word of mouth. People send in their resumes, some get invited for interviews, and the best get offers. At no point does nationality or salary play a role, either way.

    Only once the companies have already decided who they want to hire do silly US regulations, like posting to "Sunday newspapers". Geez, who gets hired based on responding to a Sunday newspaper ad anymore? Day laborers? So, yes, people who are saying that these ads are a sham are absolutely right, they're just wrong about why people are posting these ads.

    Don't kid yourself: if you can't get a job as a software engineer now, you won't get one even if no foreign labor gets admitted to the US. The consequence of restricting H1b visas is simply that the jobs themselves move overseas.
  • get real (Score:5, Insightful)

    by nanosquid (1074949) on Saturday June 23, 2007 @02:31PM (#19621563)
    What the lawyer is talking about is a green card application, usually for someone who has already worked many years at a company and lived and paid taxes in the US. There is a formal requirement that the company post a job ad. Of course, companies don't want any applicants for that job ad: they already have someone for that job that they have invested a lot of time and money in. Do you seriously think they are going to send that guy home based on someone who sends in a resume? And companies are likely paying that guy competitively because once they get the green card, he could leave immediately.

    I've seen these requirements for formal job postings in non-immigration contexts as well, and they never work. If finding qualified, good applicants were as simple as posting a job ad and collecting resumes, headhunters and hiring bounties would be such a booming business.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by llansamlet (792911)
      Exactly My company transferred to the US, and I went over for a year on a company transfer visa. I was paid competitively and paid taxes in the US. After a year the company started green card applications for those who wanted it. If they hadn't then in a few years, the staff with the most experience and knowledge of the software would have had to leave the company to return home, and the company would have been in considerable trouble - generating less tax and with less chance of hiring more US workers. I
  • Security Clearance (Score:3, Insightful)

    by gatkinso (15975) on Saturday June 23, 2007 @02:46PM (#19621685)
    Last refuge of the American tech worker. (We'll see how long that lasts.)

    The rest of the world wonders why America has suddenly taken to blowing up small nations... when many of the only moderately secure jobs in the US are in the defense sector.

    Sigh.
  • RTFA (Score:5, Interesting)

    by nanosquid (1074949) on Saturday June 23, 2007 @02:58PM (#19621797)
    These lawyers are talking about job ads as part of the green card application process. That is, the goal of the process is to get a current or future employee a green card. As soon as the employee gets the green card, they can quit and work somewhere else if they aren't being paid competitively.

    So, why don't companies want responses to these ads? Because they already know that they aren't going to get any good responses to a newspaper ad. How do they know that? Because they are already running lots of ads all over the place. Any response they are going to get is just going to hold up the green card application unnecessarily.

    These companies are trying to do the right thing--getting their foreign employees green cards. They don't deserve to be dragged through the mud for it.
  • by theodp (442580) on Saturday June 23, 2007 @03:15PM (#19621933)
    Looks like conventional plagiarism rules don't always apply at Pitt's Katz Graduate School of Business, where the law firm of Cohen & Grigsby is paid to 'draft appropriate letters of support' for H-1B seeking MBA grads [pitt.edu] as part of the Pitt-funded Katzport Program [pitt.edu]. The school boasts that the program - which can cost Pitt upwards of $4,000 per student - 'levels the playing field' to 'facilitate the employment of international MBA graduates.'
  • by codepunk (167897) on Saturday June 23, 2007 @05:10PM (#19622847)
    There is a rather simple solution to the great immigration and guest worker debate. I spent 10 years
    of my life in the US military. There are 10's of thousands of other troops on the front lines
    in Iraq fighting insurgents. These brave men are putting their lives on the line every day so that we here in the states can maintain what freedoms we still have and assisting in securing our national interests.

    If you want to immigrate to the US then fine you spend 4 years active duty in my country's military and earn your green card. Everyone able bodied and of qualified military age should have to serve
    4 years in our military to earn a green card. After those 4 years if someone want's to deny you
    a green card, I will be the first to help you kick their ass.

    Our troops ain't over there right now risking their lives just so they can come home and be
    denied jobs because of crap like this!

    Now tell me I am wrong!
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by bagsc (254194)
      As a vet myself, I've spent some time thinking about the pros and cons to this.

      First, we raised our standards between the 70's and the 80's for a reason - smart volunteers fight a lot better than desperate inductees. It would be trickier than integration was in the 1950s. The screening process for a foreign military applicant would have to be fairly intense: there are no background checks that are economical, they couldn't receive clearances which are necessary for most specializations, they'd have to be

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