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Copy-and-Paste Reveals Classified U.S. Documents 1325

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the hate-when-that-happens dept.
cyclop writes "In March, U.S. troops in Iraq shot to death Nicola Calipari, the Italian intelligence agent that rescued the kidnapped journalist Giuliana Sgrena. U.S. commission on the incident produced a report which public version was censored for more than one third. Now Italian press is reporting that all confidential information in the report is available to the public, just by copying "hidden" text from the PDF and pasting it in a word processor (Italian). The uncensored report can now be directly downloaded (evil .DOC format, sorry)"
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Copy-and-Paste Reveals Classified U.S. Documents

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  • Mirror, as HTML (Score:5, Informative)

    by lewww (671699) * on Sunday May 01, 2005 @08:44AM (#12397680)
    Mirrored here in html format: http://213.160.111.174/unclassified.htm [213.160.111.174]
  • Re:Oh dear (Score:3, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday May 01, 2005 @08:47AM (#12397689)
    The copy-paste method has already been employed and shown on /. a few times in the past.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday May 01, 2005 @08:51AM (#12397711)
    Believe it or not, US law only applies to the, ...er, US!
  • by willCode4Beer.com (783783) on Sunday May 01, 2005 @08:57AM (#12397745) Homepage Journal
    Calipari, jumps the omissis of the Americans
    On Internet the relationship in its interezza can be read. The Power of attorney of Rome will acquire the new document like open source

    INSTRUMENTS
    VERSION STAMPABILE
    The READ PIU'
    IT SENDES THIS ARTICLE
    The USA relationship with omissis (AP)
    ROME - They are omissis "only virtual", than they can be gone around with simple clic, those lies in wait for to the USA relationship on the dead women of Nicholas Calipari, published friday, and that they would have had to hide names, procedures and others you leave classified. Pecette black that filled up the 45 the pages of the document answered to obvious reasons of inner emergency, a way in order protect the anonymity of the marines been involved in the "tragic incident" of 4 March, when Calipari found the dead women for "fire friend" on the road for the airport of Bagdad.

    Sin but that the USA commando had not made the accounts with the "copy and glue", that concurs to read the relationship in its interezza, without censorships. How? E' sufficient to open the document it originates them with the version reader of Acrobat, to select all the text and to make a copy and glue on Word or whichever editor. Or, easier anchor, to open rows "pdf" originates them, to cliccare on "Saves come..." and to choose a whichever various format from the "pdf" (always Word, as an example). A simplest technical operation that is in a position to executing anyone has a connected computer to Internet.

    Between the parts of the relationship covered the military secret USA there is as an example the paragraph with the names of the members of the patrol who has talked nonsense against the car of Calipari, or the identity of the third man (an Italian agent) to the guide of the car with Giuliana Sgrena and Calipari, and still the understood one it with the procedures of I engage of the check point. Emergency "around to John Negroponte emerges also the operation" and the difficulties of that evening in the particular chain of commando americana.Tutti, with to many others, that they are hour becomes you of public dominion and that the power of attorney of Rome that it inquires on the Calipari homicide will acquire. It is how much is learned in atmospheres investigated you of Clodio Large square. The acquisition procedure is that one that the enquirers define of the so-called opened sources, that is news of interest for the judicial authority that but does not have some trial-like valence.
  • Pdftotext does it (Score:5, Informative)

    by orzetto (545509) on Sunday May 01, 2005 @09:02AM (#12397768)

    Download the pdf and run pdftotext on it, it works.

    Marx was right: Military intelligence is a contradiction in terms.

  • by dotmaudot (243236) on Sunday May 01, 2005 @09:06AM (#12397792) Homepage
    Needless to say, no Italian newspaper ever cares to cite that the news was pointed out by an Italian blogger, Gianluca Neri of Macchianera [macchianera.net].
  • by alangmead (109702) * on Sunday May 01, 2005 @09:15AM (#12397847)

    There were at least two publicized incidents Memory Hole Un-Redacts Redacted DOJ Memo [slashdot.org] and Iranian Coup Plotters Exposed By PDF File [slashdot.org] were the PDF was discovered to be layered with the graphic blacking out the text over the original.

    You would think by now that the government would either distributed a tool for correctly redacting PDFs or prohibit them.

  • Re:If it was me (Score:2, Informative)

    by farmkid (15226) on Sunday May 01, 2005 @09:15AM (#12397848)
    But they're confirmed by satelite photo:

    http://patterico.com/2005/04/30/2934/ilos-angeles- timesi-editors-edit-reuters-story-to-remove-critic al-facts-supporting-us-position/ [patterico.com]

    The witnesses are lying or mistaken (and, I suspect, it's the former).
  • Re:If it was me (Score:3, Informative)

    by FredThompson (183335) <fredthompson@nOsPAm.mindspring.com> on Sunday May 01, 2005 @09:17AM (#12397856)
    Oh, I dunno. Maybe the fact that the U.S. released satellite images showing the position of the car which where taken with a known time differential combined with basic algebra means the approximate speed of the car can easily be determined. Maybe it was about 10 seconds from impacting the soldiers and was speeding means the car was a reasonable threat. You'd trust the "opinion" of a rabid anti-American communist about the speed of the car and behavior fo the driver wrt the roadblock?

    Facts are stubborn things but they don't matter if you start with a conclusion, huh?
  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday May 01, 2005 @09:17AM (#12397858)
    Here. [mypetjawa.mu.nu]

    This self-avowed communist is so full of shit her eyeballs are solid brown.

    I've turned in rental cars in worse shape and not been charged extra for damage.
  • by mikael (484) on Sunday May 01, 2005 @09:20AM (#12397871)
    You don't zoom thru an armed checkpoint in Iraq.

    According to the Italian version of the event, they weren't speeding through the checkpoint, nor were they given any warning that there was a checkpoint up ahead (no lights, signs, or soldiers waving them down).
  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday May 01, 2005 @09:21AM (#12397877)
    Here [mypetjawa.mu.nu] and here [blogspot.com].

    Look at how "badly" her car was "shot up" and decide for yourself if this "journalist" is a lying sack of shit for saying that the car was shot at 300 or 400 times [guardian.co.uk].

    Now, use the information you have just learned to judge her credibility as a whole.
  • Re:No smoking gun? (Score:5, Informative)

    by KidHash (766864) on Sunday May 01, 2005 @09:25AM (#12397893) Homepage
    Should I expect less if I make jerky motions into my pockets when a police officer pulls me over for a routine traffic accident?

    I guess it depends where you live. In the UK, if I made jerky motions into my pocket when puled over for a routine traffic accident, I certainly wouldn't expect to get shot.

    And if I was, there'd be a public outcry. Don't assume we're all trigger happy...
  • Re:Oh dear (Score:3, Informative)

    by ckswift (700993) on Sunday May 01, 2005 @09:32AM (#12397936)
    This has happened before...You think the goverment would have learned from their mistakes.

    Memory Hole Un-Redacts Redacted DOJ Memo [slashdot.org]
  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday May 01, 2005 @09:33AM (#12397941)
    Microsoft Word documents, with their history tracking information, have been the cause of many breaches in the past.
  • by sagenumen (62467) <mtrillo@@@gmail...com> on Sunday May 01, 2005 @09:41AM (#12397989)
    At the risk of sounding like a karma-whore to all those people that accuse people as such, I have made a PDF of the .DOC

    It can be found here: http://www.lehigh.edu/~mlt3/Unclassified.pdf [lehigh.edu]
  • Re:Er.. (Score:5, Informative)

    by cynicalmoose (720691) <giles.robertson@westminster.org.uk> on Sunday May 01, 2005 @09:41AM (#12397992) Homepage
    Effectively not. You will notice that paragraphs in the document are preceded either by (U) or by (S//NF)

    (U) simply means Unclassified.
    (S//NF) means "Secret/No Foreign Nationals".

    Any US citizen has not violated fundamental clearance issues by reading it (however, OpSec provides that this information should only be available on a need to know basis). Non-US Citizens outside the US aren't covered by US law in the same way.
    The position of Non-US nationals in the US is probably different.
    I am neither a Lawyer nor a US Citizen and I possess no US Security Clearance.
  • Re:Mirror, as HTML (Score:1, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday May 01, 2005 @09:44AM (#12398009)
    Actually it hasn't been "corriere.it" that discovered the trick to reveal the hidden parts, but it has been Gianluca Neri, well-known blogger from www.macchianera.net.
    Other newspapers' sites just ripped the news (and to be fairly honest, by *directly* linking to Neri's server instead of hosting possibly compromising files themselves)

    He reports (in Italian) here: http://www.macchianera.net/archives/2005/05/il_rap porto_cal.html [macchianera.net]
  • by KarmaMB84 (743001) on Sunday May 01, 2005 @09:46AM (#12398016)
    Satellite photos with time differentials show that the car *must* have been going an average of 60+ mph to cover the distance it had covered between photos. Some of the papers were leaving that bit out of their stories (LA Times for example).
  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday May 01, 2005 @09:53AM (#12398077)
    Since the majority of you /.'ers didn't read the link the reason it's classified is because it points out the following things:

    a) It shows Enemy Tactics, Techniques and Procedures (TTP's)

    b) It shows Coalition TTP's responsive combat dialogue with Enemy TTP's

    c) It gives away the primary routes for incoming/outgoing US embassy personnel with technical, personnel and operational details.

    Being a soldier who just got back from Iraq I'm actually pretty pissed at this because of the fucking dangers behind it. But I'll leave it at that.
  • Re:We'll find out (Score:5, Informative)

    by theonetruekeebler (60888) on Sunday May 01, 2005 @09:58AM (#12398102) Homepage Journal
    Why is the government keeping that information secret

    A vdiff between the censored and unmasked versions suggests that much of what was redacted is operational details, such as:

    • An itemization of IEDs and VBIEDs deployment techniques which have been most effective,
    • An analysis of the tactical strengths and weaknesses of specific checkpoints along "Route Irish",
    • Combat readiness assesment of the units and soldiers involved,
    • A detailed description of how the checkpoint is laid out,
    • Exact grid locations of various assets.
    • Details of how checkpoint searches are set up and executed
    • Details of how checkpoints are expected to deal with approaching vehicles, including threat assesment methods.
    • A statistical analysis of "normal" traffic approaching the checkpoint.

    It names the soldiers involved and details the specific actions taken by those soldiers. It names the soldier who killed Calipari.

    It briefly describes U.S. Embassy procedures for transporting VIPs along Route Irish and in general.

    It details movement of U.S. and Italian Embassy personnel.

    It describes possible future procedures and configurations for checkpoints.

    In other words it has a lot of information of potential use to an insurgent mission planner and a lot that is nobody's business.

  • Re:Mirror, as HTML (Score:3, Informative)

    by Rupan (723469) on Sunday May 01, 2005 @10:05AM (#12398144) Homepage
    Heh, looks like you beat me to the punch. I just put my own converted doc up:

    http://www.css-auth.com/Unclassified.html [css-auth.com]
  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday May 01, 2005 @10:13AM (#12398197)
    No, it is relevant. It's a "he said, she said" case, where "she" holds a political viewpoint that is distinctly anti-American. It is certainly not the same being black, since race cannot be chosen, and is not the same as a belief system.

    You'll forgive me if I think it's relevant that she has stated things like:
    "The Americans are the biggest enemies of mankind" [zachtei.nl]
    "You don't understand the situation. We are anti-imperialists, anti-capitalists, communists,' they said. The Iraqis only kidnap American sympathizers, the enemies of the Americans have nothing to fear." (Emphasis added)

  • Re:Er.. (Score:3, Informative)

    by Chris Burke (6130) on Sunday May 01, 2005 @10:21AM (#12398247) Homepage
    Freedom pie?
  • Re:No smoking gun? (Score:1, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday May 01, 2005 @10:47AM (#12398439)
    The Italian car was on a section of road that required passing through several check points just to get there.

    A tank was sitting on the side of the road in the middle of nowhere.

    The car passed the tank, and the soldiers onboard opened fire on the Italians as they drove away.

    This was not at a checkpoint. They were not driving out of control, refusing to stop. They were given no warning.
  • by Herr_Jones (880324) on Sunday May 01, 2005 @11:00AM (#12398537)
    satellite tracking covered in the news [powerlineblog.com]. My guess is because that kind of info is higher than S/NF, and therefore may not have made this report at all.
  • by baffo (126216) on Sunday May 01, 2005 @11:21AM (#12398661) Homepage
    Compounded with:

    the current Italian government (the useless slimeball Berlusconi) being in trouble at home right now, so needing to show some measure of backbone

    the Italian tradition of paying ransom, which Americans really do not like but do their best to ignore, since you cannot very well spank allies

    the age-honored tradition of keeping allies in the dark as much as possible

    Result: one dead cop.
  • Slashdot isn't in the business of covering the war in Iraq. I will note that the same article points out that terrorist bombs killed more than the US troops.
    Also, as a former US serviceman, we are not out to murder anybody. You're a jackass if you think that's what the servicemen are out to do.
  • by mmkkbb (816035) on Sunday May 01, 2005 @11:36AM (#12398755) Homepage Journal
    john walker lindh went into afghanistan with the intent of supporting the taliban against the northern alliance. until his capture he was unaware of us involvement. (according to his statements, at least)
  • Re:Subject to US Law (Score:3, Informative)

    by h4rm0ny (722443) on Sunday May 01, 2005 @12:03PM (#12398942) Journal

    Iraq may have voted but they had to fight for it. The original intention of the US wasn't to allow voting for a good while longer (poss. 2006). They were forced into it by insurgency in Iraq and the need for good PR from pressure at home.

    When Saddam was deposed, the Iraqis quickly self-organized and elected community leaders, took care of routine work (hospitals, refuse collection, etc) and this was done largely democratically. However, this (a) didn't fit with the US plan of importing management trained civil structure and (b) was an immediate threat to their authority. Many people were duly arrested and declared "terrorists."

    The US doesn't want to share power and is pulling every string it can under the mask of democracy. I'm not well-informed enough to say where the balance of power is between democratic and US forces in Iraq but this definitely isn't quite the situation that the US wants. Notice all the sabre rattling that's been done at Iran recently. That's because a large number of the Iraqis would like to get cosy with their brother's next door and that is the last thing that the US wants.

    You can be sure that if the Iraq 'democracy' gets too far away from US plans then there will be further large scale military action. The power factions in Iraq are well aware of that and are planning accordingly.
  • From Page 24 (Score:3, Informative)

    by Kiyooka (738862) on Sunday May 01, 2005 @12:31PM (#12399093)
    35 UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED
    (U) Specialist Lozano spotlighted the car before it reached the Alert Line, fired warning shots as it reached the Warning Line, and fired on the vehicle in an attempt to disable it immediately after it crossed the Warning Line. (Annexes 79C, 87C, 129C, 134C).
    (U) Specialist Lozano was the only one to fire his weapon. (Annexes 77C, 79C, 81C, 83C, 85C, 87C, 89C).
    (U) The car was traveling at approximately 50 mph as it crossed the Warning Line. (Annex 83C).
    (U) Mr. Carpani did not apply his brakes until after the rounds began striking the car. (Annexes 104C, 105C).
    (U) Given the cyclic rate of fire of the M240B, Specialist Lozano's expertise with the weapon, and that only 11 rounds struck the vehicle with only five of those impacting the front of the car, it is highly unlikely that any shots were fired after the car came to a stop. (Annexes 79C, 6G, 1I, 3M).
    (U) Both the blocking and overwatch vehicles were moved after the incident as directed by Captain Drew to transport Ms. Sgrena to the Combat Support Hospital. Both vehicles were needed to provide security for the move to the hospital. (Annexes 74C, 77C).
    (U) The gunner complied with the Rules of Engagement. After operating the spotlight, and perceiving the on-coming vehicle as a threat, he fired to disable it and did not intend to harm anyone in the vehicle. (Annexes 79C, 83C).
    -------------------

    The report says 50mph. Yeah, I drive faster than that going to work, so the Italians probably don't see that as very fast, but I could see how that *would* be considered fast if you're approaching an army checkpoint already nervous about suicide bombers.

    What I don't get is this: I find it hard to believe that the Italian agents neglected to tell other troops around that area what they were planning to do. It's common sense because your allies are armed forces too. Something about this just doesn't seem to fit yet (for me).
  • by Mac Degger (576336) on Sunday May 01, 2005 @12:37PM (#12399123) Journal
    You should read more about foreigners in Iraq. They /all/ go speeding around as fast as possible over the iraqi roads. It's SOP: to do anything else would be suicide. Read up on the security contractors, or how the journalists go around (when they do get out of their hotels)...hell, driving around at breakneck speeds is SOP for american soldiers, fer crying out loud!

    The real question is why did a tank-ish thing, which was situated btween two checkpoints and behind a curve without a LOS on the first checkpoint fire at a van which had already passed them (and, coincidentally, the first checkpoint)?
  • Re: Insightful? (Score:3, Informative)

    by Orion_ (83461) on Sunday May 01, 2005 @01:07PM (#12399334)
    No, in fact it is rented from Cuba (even though they refuse the payment) and the U.S. government's position is that it is therefore foreign soil and not subject to U.S. laws or Constitution.

    That was the position of the Bush administration, but the Supreme Court disagrees [findlaw.com]. Six out of nine justices rejected that argument, holding that alien prisoners at Guantanamo do have the right to challenge their imprisonment by filing a habeas petition in federal court.
  • Re: Insightful? (Score:2, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday May 01, 2005 @01:10PM (#12399354)
    Citing an opinion piece from 2003 hardly concludes the argument in your favor when the Supreme Court has subsequently ruled on the matter. In fact, the Court has ruled that Guantanamo Bay does fall within the jurisdiction of the United States Court and that the prisoners held there have the same rights as they would if their were held in one of the states or territories of the US. Because of their status as enemy combatants, those rights are limited to little more than the Writ of Habeas Corpus until such time as an Article III court rules that they are being improperly held by the Executive, but it is incorrect to claim (as the Bush administration tried to) that the Gitmo prisoners are totally outside of the jurisdiction of the United States Court and without constitutional guarantees of their due process rights.
  • Re:Oh dear (Score:3, Informative)

    by logicnazi (169418) <logicnazi@gmaiMONETl.com minus painter> on Sunday May 01, 2005 @01:22PM (#12399427) Homepage
    I dunno about the impact. I expect the iraqi insurgents already have a much better idea of how our security operations work than they can gain through this document. After all they have the opportunity to actually observe this operations and how they react to their attacks.

    I expect the information was just concealed as a matter of course in case it might contain something of value to the enemy. Still though your overall point is valid. There is no reason the public really needs to know this stuff and it is better safe than sorry with information which might let them kill more soldiers.
  • Re:Oh dear (Score:5, Informative)

    by Kymermosst (33885) on Sunday May 01, 2005 @01:49PM (#12399634) Journal
    I was a 10th Mountain Division soldier from Feb. 1996 to Dec. 1998.

    I dunno about the impact. I expect the iraqi insurgents already have a much better idea of how our security operations work than they can gain through this document. After all they have the opportunity to actually observe this operations and how they react to their attacks.

    Observation is one thing, but one thing your eyes don't necessarily tell you is what the opponent thinks about itself and its own tactics. This report now gives out that information to the enemy, and includes information about combat readiness and the perceived effectiveness of the enemy's tactics.

    It also gives more extensive information on what the various SOPs (standard operating procedures) have to say about certain sitations than you can gain by observation.

    I expect the information was just concealed as a matter of course in case it might contain something of value to the enemy. Still though your overall point is valid. There is no reason the public really needs to know this stuff and it is better safe than sorry with information which might let them kill more soldiers.

    Precisely, and since this directly affects some of the units I'd worked with, I fully support the (time-limited*) "censorship" of this kind of information. The idiot that failed to do it effectivly needs some severe discipline.

    I've got friends and former coworkers in Iraq, and the release of this kind of information doesn't help them one bit.

    (* meaning that after the conflict is over, plus some time, the full report should be (have been) released.)
  • by philbert26 (705644) on Sunday May 01, 2005 @01:58PM (#12399696)
    Please, show me the section of the constitution that says "The preceding stuff doesn't apply when the US government is acting abroad, and the victims of its actions are foreigners."

    The US Supreme Court says just this in UNITED STATES v. VERDUGO-URQUIDEZ [findlaw.com]. You can always rely on the war on drugs to ensure that government interest prevail.

  • by TopShelf (92521) on Sunday May 01, 2005 @02:31PM (#12399990) Homepage Journal
    If you read the report, you'll see that a key recommendation is to establish additional non-lethal barriers (like stop-sticks) to help avoid future incidents like this.
  • by jbn-o (555068) <mail@digitalcitizen.info> on Sunday May 01, 2005 @02:46PM (#12400119) Homepage

    For more background information on this shooting, watch [archive.org] and/or hear [archive.org] Giuliana Sgrena's most recent discussion of the topic on the Wednesday, April 27, 2005 edition of Democracy Now! [democracynow.org]

  • by khasim (1285) <brandioch.conner@gmail.com> on Sunday May 01, 2005 @02:56PM (#12400207)
    You post claims and for substantiation, you link to other stories with those claims.

    The "satelite photo" story does not contain any satelite photos.

    The reference to "handfuls of bullets" does not have her saying that. Only her boyfriend telling someone that she said that to him.

    The reference to the "4 inch tank round" again does not have her saying that but has someone who claims to have heard her say that.

    The REAL question is whether or not they had passed through other checkpoints.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday May 01, 2005 @03:01PM (#12400235)
    What they don't want you to know was that the car was on a secure road, where there should not have been a checkpoint at all, since Iraqi resistance forces have no way to access this road. It's a highly secure road. The Italians had no reason to expect a "checkpoint" on this road; the fact that they there was one is highly suspicious, to say the least. Wake up and smell the coffee, people!

    http://www.antiwar.com/blog/index.php?id=P1957 [antiwar.com]

    Naomi Klein has interviewed Giuliana Sgrena in Rome. The revelations in this Democracy Now interview of Klein significantly challenge the stories we've heard thus far in the press:

    One of the things that we keep hearing is that she was fired on on the road to the airport, which is a notoriously dangerous road. In fact, it's often described as the most dangerous road in the world. So this is treated as a fairly common and understandable incident that there would be a shooting like this on that road. And I was on that road myself, and it is a really treacherous place with explosions going off all the time and a lot of checkpoints. What Giuliana told me that I had not realized before is that she wasn't on that road at all. She was on a completely different road that I actually didn't know existed. It's a secured road that you can only enter through the Green Zone and is reserved exclusively for ambassadors and top military officials. So, when Calipari, the Italian security intelligence officer, released her from captivity, they drove directly to the Green Zone, went through the elaborate checkpoint process which everyone must go through to enter the Green Zone, which involves checking in obviously with U.S. forces, and then they drove onto this secured road. And the other thing that Giuliana told me that she's quite frustrated about is the description of the vehicle that fired on her as being part of a checkpoint. She says it wasn't a checkpoint at all. It was simply a tank that was parked on the side of the road that opened fire on them. There was no process of trying to stop the car, she said, or any signals. From her perspective, they were just -- it was just opening fire by a tank. The other thing she told me that was surprising to me was that they were fired on from behind. Because I think part of what we're hearing is that the U.S. soldiers opened fire on their car, because they didn't know who they were, and they were afraid. It was self-defense, they were afraid. The fear, of course, is that their car might blow up or that they might come under attack themselves. And what Giuliana Sgrena really stressed with me was that she -- the bullet that injured her so badly and that killed Calipari, came from behind, entered the back seat of the car. And the only person who was not severely injured in the car was the driver, and she said that this is because the shots weren't coming from the front or even from the side. They were coming from behind, i.e. they were driving away. So, the idea that this was an act of self-defense, I think becomes much more questionable. And that detail may explain why there's some reticence to give up the vehicle for inspection. Because if indeed the majority of the gunfire is coming from behind, then clearly, they were firing from -- they were firing at a car that was driving away from them.

    There's more....

    http://www.democracynow.org/article.pl?sid=05/03/2 5/1516242&mode=thread&tid=25 [democracynow.org]

    Why won't the US let the Italians inspect the car? The Italians purchased the car from the rental company so they can do forensics. The US won't let them have the car. Why not? Hello? Bueller? Bueller?

    http://atimes.com/atimes/Middle_East/GD28Ak01.html [atimes.com]

    Klein then gave an extensive in

  • Re:Mirror, as HTML (Score:1, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday May 01, 2005 @03:05PM (#12400257)
    What they don't want you to know was that the car was on a secure road, where there should not have been a checkpoint at all, since Iraqi resistance forces have no way to access this road. It's a highly secure road. The Italians had no reason to expect a "checkpoint" on this road; the fact that they there was one is highly suspicious, to say the least. Wake up and smell the coffee, people!

    http://www.antiwar.com/blog/index.php?id=P1957 [antiwar.com]

    Naomi Klein has interviewed Giuliana Sgrena in Rome. The revelations in this Democracy Now interview of Klein significantly challenge the stories we've heard thus far in the press:

    One of the things that we keep hearing is that she was fired on on the road to the airport, which is a notoriously dangerous road. In fact, it's often described as the most dangerous road in the world. So this is treated as a fairly common and understandable incident that there would be a shooting like this on that road. And I was on that road myself, and it is a really treacherous place with explosions going off all the time and a lot of checkpoints. What Giuliana told me that I had not realized before is that she wasn't on that road at all. She was on a completely different road that I actually didn't know existed. It's a secured road that you can only enter through the Green Zone and is reserved exclusively for ambassadors and top military officials. So, when Calipari, the Italian security intelligence officer, released her from captivity, they drove directly to the Green Zone, went through the elaborate checkpoint process which everyone must go through to enter the Green Zone, which involves checking in obviously with U.S. forces, and then they drove onto this secured road. And the other thing that Giuliana told me that she's quite frustrated about is the description of the vehicle that fired on her as being part of a checkpoint. She says it wasn't a checkpoint at all. It was simply a tank that was parked on the side of the road that opened fire on them. There was no process of trying to stop the car, she said, or any signals. From her perspective, they were just -- it was just opening fire by a tank. The other thing she told me that was surprising to me was that they were fired on from behind. Because I think part of what we're hearing is that the U.S. soldiers opened fire on their car, because they didn't know who they were, and they were afraid. It was self-defense, they were afraid. The fear, of course, is that their car might blow up or that they might come under attack themselves. And what Giuliana Sgrena really stressed with me was that she -- the bullet that injured her so badly and that killed Calipari, came from behind, entered the back seat of the car. And the only person who was not severely injured in the car was the driver, and she said that this is because the shots weren't coming from the front or even from the side. They were coming from behind, i.e. they were driving away. So, the idea that this was an act of self-defense, I think becomes much more questionable. And that detail may explain why there's some reticence to give up the vehicle for inspection. Because if indeed the majority of the gunfire is coming from behind, then clearly, they were firing from -- they were firing at a car that was driving away from them.

    There's more....

    http://www.democracynow.org/article.pl?sid=05/03/2 5/1516242&mode=thread&tid=25 [democracynow.org]

    Why won't the US let the Italians inspect the car? The Italians purchased the car from the rental company so they can do forensics. The US won't let them have the car. Why not? Hello? Bueller? Bueller?

    http://atimes.com/atimes/Middle_East/GD28Ak01.html [atimes.com]

    Klein then gave an extensive in

  • by Master of Transhuman (597628) on Sunday May 01, 2005 @03:23PM (#12400427) Homepage

    In case nobody has noticed, they have a Cuban terrorist sitting in Miami right now asking for asylum who bombed an airliner killing 73 people including an Italian citizen - and the Bush government is saying nothing about it.

    Why?

    Because he was against Castro, that's why.

    If you're on "our" side, you're not a terrorist, apparently, no matter how many civilians you kill.

    Not to mention the neocon support of that anti-Iranian group in northern Iraq who have engaged in terrorism against Iran.

    The fact of the matter is the US government has supported terrorism nearly as much, if not more so, than the Russian government used to do. It's just that the US seems to support state terrorism more than resistance terrorism.

    The hypocrisy doesn't get any deeper.

  • Re:Mirror, as HTML (Score:1, Informative)

    by zonker (1158) on Sunday May 01, 2005 @04:26PM (#12400966) Homepage Journal
    here's a tip for idiots that think they can hide things in pdf's:
    if you own a copy of pitstop [enfocus.com] i can break just about any pdf you produce. unless of course it is a scan that you first blacked out details before scanning. but hiding things with pdf "masking tape" will fail because i can rip elements out of a pdf with ease. if i can do it anyone one can. 'nuff said.

    btw, if you work with pdf's a lot like i do (i work in offset printing) another wonderful program is quite imposing [quite.com].
  • by Jacked (785403) on Sunday May 01, 2005 @04:44PM (#12401132)
    I don't know all of the details, but, according to a Reuters story:
    CBS news has reported that a U.S. satellite had filmed the shooting and that it had been established the car carrying Calipari was travelling at more than 60 miles (96 km) per hour as it approached the U.S. checkpoint in Baghdad.
    http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/L30104709 .htm [alertnet.org]

    I skimmed through TFA and I think the driver estimated his speed at around 50mph, too. And when he heard the warning shots, he panicked and stomped the accelerator in an attempt to get to the airport faster.

    It'd be nice if they would release the actual satellite imagery for verification, though. Regardless, Sgrena has too much of a credibility problem for me to take her word alone over the word of several U.S. troops and photographic evidence.

  • Re: Insightful? (Score:5, Informative)

    by danila (69889) on Sunday May 01, 2005 @04:47PM (#12401160) Homepage
    You may be underestimating the horror of imprisoning the people there. Watch The Power of Nightmares [informatio...house.info] by BBC. It looks weird, but it really seems that most of the terrorist threat was made up. It's very likely that 90-95% of all people in Guantanamo Bay are innocent. Do you know how flimsy the evidence was [blogspot.com] in those few cases of suspected terrorists caught on the US soil?

    The whole thing is unjustified. If we ignore the US government propaganda for a second, the whole campaign was simply an act of unprovoked irrational aggression in violation of international laws. As Viggo Mortensen said about America commenting on parallels between war in Iraq and LOTR, "We are the evil guys".
  • Re:Mirror, as HTML (Score:2, Informative)

    by gbudd (68467) on Sunday May 01, 2005 @08:21PM (#12403026)
    What they don't want you to know was that the car was on a secure road, where there should not have been a checkpoint at all, since Iraqi resistance forces have no way to access this road. It's a highly secure road. The Italians had no reason to expect a "checkpoint" on this road; the fact that they there was one is highly suspicious, to say the least. Wake up and smell the coffee, people! There are no secure roads in Baghdad, I was there and wished that there were, but there aren't. If you know the whereabouts of this "secure road" I'd sure like to know about it (and the source of this knowledge if you don't mind).

    "This is a secured road connecting the Green Zone with the huge Camp Victory military base attached to Baghdad's airport."
    I was in Baghdad at the time of this incident and travelled along route Irish often. There is no "secured road" anywhere between the airport and the Green Zone. Route Irish is the closest thing we had to a secured road and obviously the insurgents spent quite a bit of time keeping it from being secure. Route Force (Vernon) was one of the more dangerous routes in the area at the time.

    I hope everyone would agree that people worldwide should "start thinking and using their brains for a change".

    I was in the city at the time and had been for nearly a year. This sounds to me like one of the inevitable horrible tragedies that occur during wartime. Someone said "Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity." (http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Robert_J._Hanlon [wikiquote.org])
    W hat possible motive would the US have for firing at Ms Sgrena's vehicle?

    As to the charge that "Anybody who has covered the Iraq war has known - or has seen - checkpoint hell, where nervous American soldiers fire on anything that moves." I would respectfully disagree wholeheartedly. The soldiers in my company used a tremendous amount of restraint in their dealings with the local populace. I'm not saying that living in a city under occupation is by any means a pleasant experience, but our soldiers do not fire indiscriminately at every car driving down the road.
  • Re:Oh dear (Score:3, Informative)

    by intnsred (199771) on Sunday May 01, 2005 @10:03PM (#12403788) Homepage
    This is a quote cited in BU History Prof. Howard Zinn's famous book A People's History of the United States [amazon.com]. In it, Zinn quotes from a then-secret National Security Council memo of 1952:

    Southeast Asia, especially Malaya and Indonesia, is the principal world source of natural rubber and tin, and a producer of petroleum and other strategically important commodities...

    Zinn's chapter on Vietnam is enlightening and covers much that 30 years of revision now routinely leaves out of our history texts; not only does it make the case for the US economic aspects for creating the puppet South Vietnamese regime, but also the geopolitical "logic". Definitely worth reading.
  • Re: Insightful? (Score:3, Informative)

    by sstidman (323182) on Sunday May 01, 2005 @10:28PM (#12403928) Journal
    It seems like they had more reason than just a watch:

    "One of the detainee's known aliases was on a list of captured hard drives associated with a senior al Qaida member".

    That's quite a bit stronger evidence than a mere watch. And that is from a list containing only unclassified evidence; who knows what the classified evidence might be.
  • Re:Oh dear (Score:1, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday May 01, 2005 @11:08PM (#12404142)
    "Spoken like a true tyrant." uh, dipshit, that was a challenge to the slashdot moderators. oh look, your Leftist pals are censoring the post as a troll. you're doing what's called "projection."

    your communist shitstain of a journalist hasn't had the most consistent story, either. her claims that the car was "riddled with bullets" and that she was "picking up handfuls of bullets" are patently false... at least according to any and all verified press photographs of the car. your hallowed "journalist" lies through her teeth.

    concerning the inspection of the car... one of the other Leftist drones around here was all in a huff because the Italians were able to get the car after all, but had to get it from the car's owner.

    so basically, you're full of shit.
  • by olafva (188481) on Monday May 02, 2005 @01:18AM (#12404742) Homepage
    How did this suddenly become a massacre? I suggest checking
    the dictionary (below). "Just for the fun of it". Let's get real.
    This was no fun for anyone involved and a serious blunder
    (particularly by the driver and others in Italian command) in a war zone.

    The innattentive driver failed to heed warnings and
    continued driving ~ 50 mph (faster than the 11 cars
    preceding it that stopped successfully) despite a bright warning
    light, a green lazer and warning shots. It's another case
    to show just how innatentive drivers are when chatting on cell phones. Also, no warning was given by the Italians to any U.S. authorities which could have made this a sucessful escape.

    massacre P Pronunciation Key (ms-kr)
    n.
    The act or an instance of killing a large number of humans indiscriminately and cruelly.

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