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Cloud Open Source Programming IT

Employers Want More Open Source Workers, Says Linux Foundation Study (zdnet.com) 164

As in past years, "Open source is professionalizing, and employers are seeking staff with demonstrable skills," says the executive director of the Linux Foundation, describing the results of a new study with Dice.com. An anonymous reader quotes ZDNet: According to the two groups' 2017 Open Source Jobs Survey and Report, "Not only do 89 percent of hiring managers report difficulty in finding qualified talent for open source roles, but 58 percent report needing to hire more open source professionals in the next six months than in the six months prior"... Seventy percent of employers, up from 66 percent in 2016, are hunting for workers with cloud experience. Web technologies placed second, with 67 percent of hiring managers hunting for workers with JavaScript and related skills. This is up five percent from last year's 62 percent. The demand for Linux talent remains strong. Sixty-five percent of hiring managers are looking for Linux experts. That's down slightly from 2016's 71 percent.
The three most common positions that they're looking to fill are developer, DevOps engineer, and systems administrator, according to the study, and "a growing number of companies (60 percent) are looking for full-time hires, compared with 53 percent last year.

"Nearly half (47 percent) of companies will pay for employees to become open-source certified."
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Employers Want More Open Source Workers, Says Linux Foundation Study

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  • by Jody Bruchon ( 3404363 ) on Saturday August 26, 2017 @03:26PM (#55090431)
    "89 percent of hiring managers report difficulty in finding qualified talent for open source roles"

    When your job ad demands 7-10 years of experience in a thing that isn't even 10 years old [i.redd.it] then yeah, you might have some difficulty "finding quality talent" because you're being ridiculous.

    Job ad bullet points are used as filters and do a great job (ha!) of filtering out all of the ideal candidates in favor of the ones that will gladly lie about their skill sets yet can't write anything more trivial than strcpy() on a whiteboard. Maybe you stop looking for "workers with cloud experience" and start looking for "workers that have great system administration skills who we'll train to use the specific 'cloud' thingy we're using this month." After all, what these job posts that demand a "hit the ground running" candidate fail to realize is that they have to train the new employee in the operations and peculiarities unique to their business anyway.

    Pay a decent wage and write realistic job applications and give everyone who applies in earnest a fair shake and you might not have so much "difficulty finding quality talent."
    • by Gravis Zero ( 934156 ) on Saturday August 26, 2017 @03:37PM (#55090473)

      Job ad bullet points are used as filters and do a great job (ha!) of filtering out all of the ideal candidates in favor of the ones that will gladly lie about their skill sets yet can't write anything more trivial than strcpy() on a whiteboard. Maybe you stop looking for "workers with cloud experience" and start looking for "workers that have great system administration skills who we'll train to use the specific 'cloud' thingy we're using this month." After all, what these job posts that demand a "hit the ground running" candidate fail to realize is that they have to train the new employee in the operations and peculiarities unique to their business anyway.

      This, sooooo much this!

      HR is the real problem here and they need to be fired.

      • by omnichad ( 1198475 ) on Saturday August 26, 2017 @05:04PM (#55090759) Homepage

        Let's have HR get right on that.

      • HR is doing their job.

        Their job is not to hire you. Their job is to reduce risk and retention. That means less firings and lawsuits.

        If that means hiring Indians who have that experience, but may not be A players that is fine as that reduces variation as they can't leave as easily. HR can show the numbers to MBAs that they reduced lawsuits and unemployment benefits.

        Very good and very bad and unpredictableness is hated among the folks who do statistics at your workplace. Dull people who show up everyday you h

        • by arth1 ( 260657 ) on Saturday August 26, 2017 @06:18PM (#55090985) Homepage Journal

          HR is doing their job.

          Their job is not to hire you. Their job is to reduce risk and retention.

          They often do an excellent job at reducing retention, I give you that.

          Now, reducing attrition would be a more noble goal. I would suggest that HR should have a forced attrition matching the company's overall attrition, for both senior and junior positions. That would give them some incentive.

          • HR is doing their job.

            Their job is not to hire you. Their job is to reduce risk and retention.

            They often do an excellent job at reducing retention, I give you that.

            Now, reducing attrition would be a more noble goal. I would suggest that HR should have a forced attrition matching the company's overall attrition, for both senior and junior positions. That would give them some incentive.

            What's the profit motive?

            Now if I owned a company where high talent was required like let's say a .COM company I would agree. If I were the CEO of Denny's I would pick retention. It doesn't take a genius to wait tables, put a steak and eggs on a grill, etc. I guess it depends on the industry, but as a worker I do find it insulting and hurtful frankly to be treated like garbage and filtered out using software applications that HR loves to use to prevent you from applying if you are not in a statistical aver

        • by zifn4b ( 1040588 )

          The problem is HR is blamed when someone else makes a poor hiring decision and needs to fire of if they quit to find a job that pays better. So they are trying to reduce this by adding mediocre workers who fit the job description rather than great or bad employees.

          Translation: when the business isn't successful, the C suite needs a scapegoat for their failure to be able to run the business adequately.

      • by zifn4b ( 1040588 )

        Job ad bullet points are used as filters and do a great job (ha!) of filtering out all of the ideal candidates in favor of the ones that will gladly lie about their skill sets yet can't write anything more trivial than strcpy() on a whiteboard. Maybe you stop looking for "workers with cloud experience" and start looking for "workers that have great system administration skills who we'll train to use the specific 'cloud' thingy we're using this month." After all, what these job posts that demand a "hit the ground running" candidate fail to realize is that they have to train the new employee in the operations and peculiarities unique to their business anyway.

        This, sooooo much this!

        HR is the real problem here and they need to be fired.

        Read my post above. Do a Google search for "Evil HR ATS". There are actually online services you can use that can compute a score for your resume and cover letter. You can actually use this to inflate your score just by word-smithing the right keywords in. The whole system is broke.

        • I love keyword searches. "I won't work with COBOL, and never touched CICS anyway. I have a friend who loves Python. I've heard about HTML, CSS, and Javascript. I own a .NET domain, and once played a musical instrument in the key of Csharp."

    • by El Cubano ( 631386 ) on Saturday August 26, 2017 @03:45PM (#55090499)

      When your job ad demands 7-10 years of experience in a thing that isn't even 10 years old [i.redd.it] then yeah, you might have some difficulty "finding quality talent" because you're being ridiculous.

      I really would like to think that this is a good way to filter out the liars or a way to test the applicant pool's BS filter. Though, I have never applied for a job that asked for more experience with something for longer than it has existed. However, if I were faced with that, I would specify my actual experience with the item and in the cover letter add a note about how what they are asking for is not possible. I would probably also add any related experience that I might have. So if they asked for 10 years of Node.js, I might put that I only have X years of Node.js experience, but I also have Y years of experience with these other dynamic server-side languages.

      Going through that will tell you quite a few things. If they reject your resume/cover letter then it was probably for the best. If they are really sharp (remember that you could have a sharp hiring manager stuck behind a not-so-sharp HR department), then they will see you for what they are worth and they are likely to also flat out reject anybody who claims to have the impossible qualification.

      Of course, a job posting that has an impossible to meet requirement might be a warning flag (e.g., dysfunctional or incompetent organization) or just a pretext to be able to say that no US citizen is qualified and that the situation calls for an H1B.

      I would like to look at it more form the positive perspective than the negative. However, after re-reading what I wrote, I suspect that might just be wishful thinking.

      • BUZZ Taleo or IMS filtered you out. HR won't even read your cover letter as a result.

        Welcome to the world of automated hiring by cloud software. Taleo was designed as an example to score and assist, but the sales team promises HR they need to do 0 screening WE DO IT ALL for you! So unless your resume has node.js for every single job you ever did since 2007 your application will be deleted and a liar will get the automated email to the HR manager.

        More than likely they will whine WE CAN"T FIND QUALIFIED appli

      • by rnturn ( 11092 )

        If they are really sharp (remember that you could have a sharp hiring manager stuck behind a not-so-sharp HR department), then they will see you for what they are worth and they are likely to also flat out reject anybody who claims to have the impossible qualification.

        Uh... that's highly doubtful. Either the ATS software has filtered you out based on the buzzwords in your resume--or because you didn't include certain oh-so-important buzzwords--or the lazy HR droid never even passed along your resume to th

    • Could not agree more. Furthermore, almost no one in HR understand engineering.
    • by zifn4b ( 1040588 )

      "89 percent of hiring managers report difficulty in finding qualified talent for open source roles" When your job ad demands 7-10 years of experience in a thing that isn't even 10 years old [i.redd.it] then yeah, you might have some difficulty "finding quality talent" because you're being ridiculous. Job ad bullet points are used as filters and do a great job (ha!) of filtering out all of the ideal candidates in favor of the ones that will gladly lie about their skill sets yet can't write anything more trivial than strcpy() on a whiteboard. Maybe you stop looking for "workers with cloud experience" and start looking for "workers that have great system administration skills who we'll train to use the specific 'cloud' thingy we're using this month." After all, what these job posts that demand a "hit the ground running" candidate fail to realize is that they have to train the new employee in the operations and peculiarities unique to their business anyway. Pay a decent wage and write realistic job applications and give everyone who applies in earnest a fair shake and you might not have so much "difficulty finding quality talent."

      I recently found the answer to this. During the great recession all companies down-sized to deal with the contracting economy. This also meant downsizing HR. HR also began receiving floods of applications for jobs due to high unemployment. HR's response to this was to implement a much more sophisticated ATS (Applicant Tracking System). These ATS's parse resumes and cover letters to do keyword matching to compute a scorecard. They also prefer a LinkedIn style resume. If you use certain fonts, formatti

  • Until you read the job description, which usually includes Active Directory, MS SQLServer, and so on. Drives me to distraction.

    • by rnturn ( 11092 )
      Yep. I would hazard a guess that 80%-90% of the emails I receive from recruiters for a senior Linux-related position list requirements that indicate that Linux is really only a very minor part of the role. The rest of the job requirements show that they're looking to fill at least three wildly different roles. Usually they want a DBA, Cisco expert, Wintel admin, and a level 3 Linux/UNIX admin with Java, C++, and Powershell experience preferred.
  • by nimbius ( 983462 ) on Saturday August 26, 2017 @03:30PM (#55090453) Homepage

    developer: write code. gotcha.

    systems administrator: write scripts, config management, handle infra. gotcha.

    DevOps engineer do neither. Write code in a shitty open floorplan office, get hounded for using noise cancelling headphones and working from home, endure nerf fights and microbrew on a tuesday because the CEO decided the devs were too gloomy for his investors to look at, and the burndown didnt matter anyway. Break incessantly from your coding job to go play sysadmin poorly. get overbooked to ops meetings, burn out and quit.

    seriously, devops is a cancer. it only makes to @botchagalupe who uses it as a vehicle to pay the mortgage. It pisses off sysadmins by turning shit like NTP into a fragile 'microservice' of hypervisors and poorly documented ruby layers. it pisses off devs by making them take an oncall shift for an OS theyve only ever deployed to.

    • systems administrator: write scripts, config management, handle infra. gotcha.

      And clea out IT storage closets. ;)

      • by ls671 ( 1122017 )

        Clea?

        I thought that you were into manga or some other Japanese character. So, you fill IT closets with cleas or what?

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... [wikipedia.org]

        • If you attempt to clutter up one of the IT closets that I spent weeks in between tickets cleaning out, be prepared to deal with a pissed off sorceress. That's my solution for reclaiming wasted space and hiring more women in IT.
          • by ls671 ( 1122017 )

            Dear creimer,

            I assume I can advertise my writing talents too, so please read this:

            https://slashdot.org/comments.... [slashdot.org]

            It pisses me off because at first, I intended to do a quick comment, in the style that you cherish and it finally took me half an hour to structure it better and I don't pretend it is perfect. This is an important part of writing.

            Keep in mind that I am not bragging about anything. I humbly offer my services as an editor since I truly believe that you might have something interesting to say afte

  • by Anonymous Coward

    "Nearly half (47 percent) of companies will pay for employees to become open-source certified."

    So nearly half of the companies are incompetent, then!

    You don't get open-source certified anywhere. Unless they actually look at your portfolio of open-source contributions. There is no certification instance. Look at Linus Torvalds or Richard Stallman - neither is "open-source certified", although they define large parts of the open-source landscape.

    • by arth1 ( 260657 )

      You don't get open-source certified anywhere.

      It depends. You can get certified by various companies (like Red Hat) for using their particular open source products. But general open-source certified, no.

      Some job seekers are open-source savvy and definitely certifiable...

    • by rnturn ( 11092 )
      Was "open source certification" something that the pollsters brought up? If so, the whole report is questionable. If it was something that the people who participated in the poll, that may make a lot of folks want to know who all these people were and what companies they work for. They may wish to cross them off the list of companies they'd like to work for.
  • by rsilvergun ( 571051 ) on Saturday August 26, 2017 @03:39PM (#55090479)
    young, attractive women want more rsilvergun. Now I wonder if I can get a job at the Linux Foundation doing studies...
  • A developer who doesn't use Visual Studio/Oracle DB/...?
    A developer who will take his employer source code and drop it on GitHub?

    A developer is a developer. Using Linux/Postgres/OpenLDAP/... doesn't make you an "Open Source" developer.

  • IBM managed to convince Cobol programmers that the world is divided into "mainframe" programmers and "PC". This is so inculcated into their brains that many of them still use those terms. I am not sure if a smart phone is an IBM or a PC, but IBM mainframe Cobol harkens back to the days when the entire os memory model allowed for no more than 640K of memory. But as long as you convince everyone who is willing to listen that not being one of "yours" is one of "others", you are golden. Just sprinkle some "
  • There are many more qualified programmers sitting on the sideline than they need. The problem is not that it is difficult to find workers. It is that it is difficult to find workers who will work for the low wages that they want to pay, especially if it requires moving to some of the ridiculously expensive locations they insist on placing their operations in.

    They know this and often advertise jobs that they have no intent to pay to fill to create the illusion that there is a shortage. This helps in their ca

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