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Yahoo Says Hackers Stole Information From Over 1 Billion Accounts (go.com) 71

An anonymous reader quotes a breaking report from ABC News: Yahoo says it believes hackers stole data from more than one billion user accounts in August 2013. The Sunnyvale, California, company says it's a different breach from the one it disclosed in September, when it said 500 million accounts were exposed. That new hack revelation raises questions about whether Verizon will try to change the terms of its $4.8 billion proposed acquisition of Yahoo. Yahoo says the information stolen may include names, email addresses, phone numbers, birthdates and security questions and answers. The company says it believes bank-account information and payment-card data were not affected.
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Yahoo Says Hackers Stole Information From Over 1 Billion Accounts

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  • by ChiefGeneralManager ( 600991 ) on Wednesday December 14, 2016 @05:50PM (#53486825)
    ....we know our privacy is non-existent. That Verizon could continue to talk of a deal after the last Yahoo! breach was amazing. If Verizon continues with an additional *billion* it shows that neither the market nor the establishment can penalise egregious data loss. It's pathetic that they claim bank account information is likely safe, but the combination of personal data _plus security questions and answers_ opens a whole new field. Wow.
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      It's pathetic that they claim bank account information is likely safe, but the combination of personal data _plus security questions and answers_ opens a whole new field.

      That's why I never give my real birthdate, location, or real answers the security questions. I don't even use the same answers across different services. It's really an obvious weakness whenever you consider that a hacker could potentially build up a pretty detailed personal history on you just by collecting all the answers to security qu

    • What makes you think Verizon isn't already "in on it?"

    • Verizon ought to can its proposed purchase: didn't they buy AOL recently? Aside from that, I'm glad that I finally migrated and closed my Yahoo account

    • by AmiMoJo ( 196126 )

      Maybe they are going to revise their bid to something more realistic now, like $9.50.

      Who am I kidding, you would have to pay me to take Yahoo away.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday December 14, 2016 @05:53PM (#53486839)

    It has utterly failed in every conceivable way. File for bankruptcy.

  • by OrangeTide ( 124937 ) on Wednesday December 14, 2016 @05:54PM (#53486851) Homepage Journal

    Why would Verizon care if a company they are buying is horribly insecure? Especially when Yahoo's users don't seem to care.

    • by tomhath ( 637240 )
      I use yahoo email as my spam sink when a site I don't care about insists on me providing an email address. Let 'em hack it, they got nothing from me.
    • by houstonbofh ( 602064 ) on Wednesday December 14, 2016 @06:28PM (#53486983)

      Why would Verizon care if a company they are buying is horribly insecure? Especially when Yahoo's users don't seem to care.

      They might see it as a plus! "Finally, customers we can really abuse that will put up with it!"

      • Yeah, but Yahoo users are notorious cheapskates. About all they are good for blasting with ads and tricking with fake news.

    • by SeaFox ( 739806 )

      Why would Verizon care if a company they are buying is horribly insecure?

      They don't care. They just want an excuse to make Yahoo lower their price. Verizon's primary reason for the purchase is to "buy" the users. They'll argue the hack is reducing the value of the Yahoo brand name and causing people to leave the service over the poor security.

  • by QuietLagoon ( 813062 ) on Wednesday December 14, 2016 @06:01PM (#53486893)

    ...The company says it believes bank-account information and payment-card data were not affected....

    Geesh. Given the history of yahoo attacks and their announcements, give it a few weeks and then we'll probably see yet another announcement from yahoo about how hackers got bank account info and payment data. It has become apparent that Yahoo may not possess the ability to run an online portal securely.

    • give it a few weeks and then we'll probably see yet another announcement from yahoo about how hackers got bank account info

      Does the NSA [theguardian.com] count?

      That said, at least some of this could be 'spin' (at least the way it's being publicized) so Verizon can pick up Yahoo for millions off the asking price, just like Nissan did to Mitsubishi before their merger.

  • They sold that shit. Again.

  • > bank-account information and payment-card data were not affected.

    Anyone in their clear mind pays for anything from Yahoo?

    • Over the years I've bought a few items from a mail-order vendor [3btech.net] that uses Yahoo! for their checkout/payment. Nothing since the breach in question, though... their deals haven't been that good recently.

      Yahoo! also offers "premium" mail service, no ads, IMAP access may be a premium-only feature.

  • Adjusted sales price: 4.844 billion [slashdot.org]
  • Yahoo has 1 billion accounts?? Surely most of them are dormant.
  • I wonder why this disclosure was made now. TFV mentions that "forensic experts" have just come up with this information. Should two major breaches like this in such a short time with delayed reporting mean the death penalty for Yahoo! ? Seems to indicate major incompetence.
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by elrous0 ( 869638 )

      Seems to indicate major incompetence.

      Hush, you fool! If you imply that a female CEO is anything less than amazing you'll have the SJW's showing up to protest our misogyny!

      OH GOD, IT'S TOO LATE! Here they come! HOW DID THEY MAKE THOSE SIGNS SO FAST?!?

    • by bondsbw ( 888959 )

      Not to mention that this happened before the one everyone thought was so bad.

  • Everything from home appliance warranties to C1@l!s . . . all with the 'yahoo.com' domain as the return address.

    I wonder what they do with the abuse reports I manually submit via Yahoo's 'blessed' spam reporting site [yahoo.com]? Pretty sad that they won't just check "abuse@yahoo.com" - I wonder what happens to reports which get sent to that altogether predictable and logical address?

  • To paraphrase Everett Dirksen, "A billion here, a billion there, pretty soon, that's a lot of users."

    (His original quote was, "A billion here, a billion there, pretty soon, you're talking real money.")

  • How in the hell can they not make money with that many customers?
    • One billion user accounts - that's more than Facebook has. If that's one billion unique users, that'd be one out of seven people on this planet with a Yahoo account.

      First there was news of a hack of half a billion accounts, now one billion. Most of these will be inactive (including mine - been years since I logged in to Yahoo, or even visited the site). Many of them just have to be throwaway accounts created by spammers or so.

  • Yahoo now reports one Brazillion accounts compromised. Someone needs to tell them that this isn't the race they want to win. Much like 'catching' a cold or 'taking' a piss, but I guess if you are losing by every other metric you find one you can excel at ? Bottom line is all of their accounts were hacked and STILL nothing of value was lost.

  • I need one of these CEO jobs. One where I can be negligent, ignoring security issues and get paid millions.

    I also need one that will give me tens of millions for getting terminated for doing a crappy job.

    Frankly, if I were in Yahoo's CEO position and did nothing, it would likely be better than what the existing CEO has "accomplished".

    • Most CEO's (all upper management generally) are complete assholes. You get exceptions but generally those are the CEO's etc. that started their own company. Anyone who "worked" his way up the ladder to a top position did it by backstabbing and being an asshole.
      The point being is that you are probably not qualified.
  • How many accounts do Yahoo have?
  • by jon3k ( 691256 ) on Wednesday December 14, 2016 @10:08PM (#53487643)
    So I think I'm just going to go to the darknet markets and sell all my personal info directly. At least then I get a cut.

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