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The Data Center Density Debate: Generational Change Brings Higher Densities (datacenterfrontier.com) 45

1sockchuck writes: Over the past decade, there have been repeated predictions of the imminent arrival of higher rack power densities. Yet extreme densities have remained focused in high performance computing. Now data center providers are beginning to adapt their designs for higher densities. One of these companies is Colovore, which is among a cliuster of companies adopting chilled-water cooling doors for their cabinets (LinkedIn is another). They say the move to higher densities is driven in part by a generational change in IT teams, as younger engineers are less worried about high-density strategies using water in the data center. "A lot of them grew up with PC gaming and water cooling right in their living room," said a Colovore executive.
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The Data Center Density Debate: Generational Change Brings Higher Densities

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  • by Anonymous Coward

    when did we start taking advice on how to run a data center from "gamers" with liquid cooling systems?

  • by Anonymous Coward

    The last international data center company I worked for had water based fire suppression.

    Saved them a ton of money, at least until one of the data centers caught fire. The whole DC was a loss. When the final fire investigation was finished and the determined cause was the wiring done by an non-licensed electrician (Another cost savings) the insurance refused to pay.

    So, put water cooling in the rack and stack that power density as high as you want. Just remember they are cutting every other corner to save a

  • Clickbait... (Score:5, Informative)

    by msauve ( 701917 ) on Sunday December 20, 2015 @03:03AM (#51152911)
    Don't bother. The article is clickbait. The submitter has a history of frequently submitting articles [slashdot.org] from the same website. I suspect 1sockchuck is affiliated and not disclosing that fact.
    • I don't see anything that looks like affiliate info in that link. And you can copy/paste the URL into a new browser tab so there's no referrer info, either.

      • by Hadlock ( 143607 )

        Their marketing department shares a slashdot account, it's pretty standard practice, really.

      • Re:Clickbait... (Score:5, Informative)

        by choprboy ( 155926 ) on Sunday December 20, 2015 @03:56AM (#51152997) Homepage

        I don't see anything that looks like affiliate info in that link. And you can copy/paste the URL into a new browser tab so there's no referrer info, either.

        The submitter has submitted 24 stories over the course of the last year. Every single one of the stories links to atleast one of the same two domains, on the same subject... It is pretty obviously an affiliated/sock puppet account for an employee or marketing department.

      • by msauve ( 701917 )
        It begins by knowing what "affiliated" means. It doesn't have to mean an Amazon-like paid referral program. It can mean that the person is an employee of, or has some other link to, the website.
  • by HockeyPuck ( 141947 ) on Sunday December 20, 2015 @09:35AM (#51153711)

    "A lot of them grew up with PC gaming and water cooling right in their living room,"

    A lot of us grew up working on water cooled mainframes right in our own data centers.

    What's that saying about 'what's old is new again...' Now get off my lawn.

    • by merky1 ( 83978 ) on Sunday December 20, 2015 @10:36AM (#51153909) Journal

      But it's a millenial telling you about it...

    • The Cray 1, introduced in 1976, used Freon cooling [ucdavis.edu]. The Freon circulated in cold bars that the individual circuit boards were mounted in. So liquid water cooling is not exactly exotic technology.

      The CRAY-1S cooling system is designed to limit the IC die temperature to a maximum of 65C. This provides a reliability margin from the 150C absolute maximum IC junction temperature. The IC package case is maintained at 54C. Heat generated in the silicon die flows through the IC package to the PC board ground plane

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