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Businesses United States IT Politics

Disney Replaces Longtime IT Staff With H-1B Workers 636

Lucas123 writes: Disney CEO Bob Iger is one of eight co-chairs of the Partnership for a New American Economy, a leading group advocating for an increase in the H-1B visa cap. Last Friday, the partnership was a sponsor of an H-1B briefing at the U.S. Capitol for congressional staffers. The briefing was closed to the press. One of the briefing documents obtained after the meeting stated, "H-1B workers complement — instead of displace — U.S. Workers." Last October, however, Disney laid off at least 135 IT staff (though employees say it was hundreds more), many of them longtime workers. Disney then replaced them with H-1B contractors that company said could better "focus on future innovation and new capabilities." The fired workers believe the primary motivation behind Disney's action was cost-cutting. "Some of these folks were literally flown in the day before to take over the exact same job I was doing," one former employee said. Disney officials promised new job opportunities as a result of the restructuring, but the former staff interviewed by Computerworld said they knew of few co-workers who had landed one of the new jobs. Use of visa workers in a layoff is a public policy issue, particularly for Disney. Ten U.S. senators are currently seeking a federal investigation into displacement of IT workers by H-1B-using contractors. Kim Berry, president of the Programmer's Guild, said Congress should protect American workers by mandating that positions can only be filled by H-1B workers when no qualified American — at any wage — can be found to fill the position."
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Disney Replaces Longtime IT Staff With H-1B Workers

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  • Technology allows (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday April 29, 2015 @09:06PM (#49582425)

    companies to run with minimal staff and still "produce" as much if not more than before. Yet we still run around with the fiction of the "work week" and a "career"... These concepts are obsolete. It's time for the leisure society with resources for all. To deny this is to say we don't have the technology to do so.

    Yet we have the technology to outsource everything. But this only benefits the few. If it benefits all, then it's wrong.

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward

      You forgot to mention "basic income" anywhere in your leisure society pamphlet. Please try again.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by bjwest ( 14070 )

      companies to run with minimal staff and still "produce" as much if not more than before. Yet we still run around with the fiction of the "work week" and a "career"... These concepts are obsolete. It's time for the leisure society with resources for all. To deny this is to say we don't have the technology to do so.

      Yet we have the technology to outsource everything. But this only benefits the few. If it benefits all, then it's wrong.

      We may have the technology, but we don't have the resources. Unless something is done about the population growth, whether or not we fix the climate change, we are done for and we'll take 99.9% of the remaining species with us. I wonder what the next civilization on this planet, or the ETs that find it, will think when they start digging up our artefacts.

      • by binarylarry ( 1338699 ) on Wednesday April 29, 2015 @09:49PM (#49582649)

        Holy shit they made porn out of EVERYTHING!

      • by Chibi Merrow ( 226057 ) <mrmerrow@nospam.monkeyinfinity.net> on Wednesday April 29, 2015 @09:49PM (#49582651) Homepage Journal

        Actually you seem to be missing the obvious: Improving the standard of living of everyone will solve the population growth problem for us. The only countries where the population is still growing like crazy are where the vast majority of citizens are poor and uneducated. Once people get a little bit of education and the ability to enjoy leisure time, they funnily enough stop having kids.

        • by garyisabusyguy ( 732330 ) on Wednesday April 29, 2015 @10:02PM (#49582725)

          Yes, having large families is a strategy for providing elder care when the parents are uncertain if their progeny will survive to adulthood

        • by PopeRatzo ( 965947 ) on Wednesday April 29, 2015 @10:19PM (#49582809) Journal

          The only countries where the population is still growing like crazy are where the vast majority of citizens are poor and uneducated.

          And at the Duggar home.

        • by hjf ( 703092 ) on Wednesday April 29, 2015 @11:25PM (#49583175) Homepage

          Once people get a little bit of education and the ability to enjoy leisure time, they funnily enough stop having kids

          Are you joking? People in "educated" countries don't "stop having kids" because they're educated. They stop having kids because they're "focusing on their careers". If there is no "career" to focus on, what keeps you from having kids?
          People in rich countries don't have kids because they're TOO BUSY WORKING.
          People in poor countries have lots of kids because THEY'RE UNEMPLOYED (or underemployed) and guess what? the only fun thing they can afford is fucking their wife.

          • contraception (Score:5, Insightful)

            by tommeke100 ( 755660 ) on Thursday April 30, 2015 @06:19AM (#49584155)
            That and the access to affordable contraception.
          • Re:Technology allows (Score:5, Interesting)

            by AmiMoJo ( 196126 ) <mojo.world3@net> on Thursday April 30, 2015 @07:21AM (#49584401) Homepage

            The fertility rate in Bangladesh has fallen to nearly 2, from a high of around 9 in the 1960s. There are still a lot of people in Bangladesh who don't have careers, they are just farmers or labourers with no real prospects. What has changed is that there was a sustained, long term effort to educate people about contraception and women's rights. Women are now more involved in family planning and both genders have a better understanding of it.

          • by Nidi62 ( 1525137 ) on Thursday April 30, 2015 @07:29AM (#49584437)

            Are you joking? People in "educated" countries don't "stop having kids" because they're educated. They stop having kids because they're "focusing on their careers". If there is no "career" to focus on, what keeps you from having kids? People in rich countries don't have kids because they're TOO BUSY WORKING. People in poor countries have lots of kids because THEY'RE UNEMPLOYED (or underemployed) and guess what? the only fun thing they can afford is fucking their wife.

            Poor countries tend to have a hjigher birthrate because they have higher infant and child mortality rates due to unsanitary conditions and a lack of access to adequate medical care. Also, employment in poor countries tends to be almost exclusively manual work such as farming, simple manufacturing (textiles, etc), or even scavenging. These types of jobs pay very little, so the more kids you have, the more income your family can bring in and the more likely you are to not starve to death.

          • by guruevi ( 827432 )

            It's mainly access to birth control methods. It's not about being too busy working, farmers historically did manual labor for 10-12 hour days 7 days a week. Yet they all produced 10-12 offspring.

            In a lot of places religious cults and superstition (until this day the Catholic Church forbids the use of condoms and birth control) make it so there is a taboo on birth control. Once the population starts being educated and females are able to afford their own birth control methods, the reproduction rate drops. St

        • I aam firmly persuaded that the most effective birth-control device of all time is the large-screen television.

          "Honey, should we have another kid? No, we won't be able to afford the new 65-inch model."

      • by fustakrakich ( 1673220 ) on Wednesday April 29, 2015 @10:12PM (#49582771) Journal

        ...we don't have the resources.

        Absolute nonsense. We just manage them poorly.

      • Unless something is done about the population growth

        Absent immigration, population growth in the US is negative.

        Ditto Europe.

        And China.

        India isn't quite there yet, but their population growth rate has been steadily declining for most of my life.

        In other words, the Third World is the only place where population growth is an issue today. So, yes, we do have the resources....

  • Translation: (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Penguinisto ( 415985 ) on Wednesday April 29, 2015 @09:07PM (#49582427) Journal

    "We were running low on our 'being an asshole' quota this month. Now be sure to continue to watch as your wives and kids demand and purchase our products, chumps."

    Mind you, that was just frustration talking... because seriously, what is anyone going to do about this?

    • Re:Translation: (Score:4, Insightful)

      by ultranova ( 717540 ) on Thursday April 30, 2015 @04:11AM (#49583869)

      Mind you, that was just frustration talking... because seriously, what is anyone going to do about this?

      Stop believing in imaginary entities such as Disney, thus leaving all their "property" free for taking. For that matter, stop believing in imaginary chains of ownership altogether; if someone's not personally using some resource, it doesn't belong to him, no matter any paper says.

      Capitalism is just a secularized religion. It's gods, and the divinely ordained order they live in, are no more immune to final sanction than any others that have guided civilizations in ages past. Invisible Hand either gets its shit together or smashes into the Ragnarock of reality, just like Historical Inevitability did in the USSR. Past accomplishments don't excuse continued lousy performance forever, for men or their gods.

  • So good old uncle Walt would not hire himself these days. Greed can exist far beyond the graveyard.
  • by speedlaw ( 878924 ) on Wednesday April 29, 2015 @09:20PM (#49582497) Homepage
    IAAL. Learned in a stint at an immigration law firm, that H1B means you write a job description that only your candidate can fill. For example, if I wanted an airplane engineer who knew jumbo jets, I could get a thousand Americans for the job. If I needed a jumbo jet guy who also could work on Bleriot biplanes, that might be a lot less. If I also said he needed to be fluent in Mandarin and Farsi, I've just written an H1-B for my candidate. The key to success is making sure that only your guy can meet the job description that YOU create. Had a friend who was H1-B, even though he was raised in the states...he never bothered for the green card, took the easy way through school, etc. Had a falling out with his boss, and the H1-B went "poof". This essentially American had to relocate to Europe, and when he didn't self deport, was excluded for five years. H1-B means your employer owns your ass. Sadly, it is now a means to "on shore" a docile labor force.
    • And, to advertise the job opening in a newspaper in a distant city that has few readers.

    • by phantomfive ( 622387 ) on Wednesday April 29, 2015 @09:34PM (#49582577) Journal

      If I also said he needed to be fluent in Mandarin and Farsi, I've just written an H1-B for my candidate.

      In my entire life I've never met anyone who filled that requirement.

      • Problem is, it lists all the qualifications as identical. When one of them matters every single day, and the others are optional and probably are only necessary once a year, if at all.

        Often what happens is that the employer has one person they want, who is generally qualified for the job and who they want to hire. Then things get arranged to get the H1-B process done, basically after the interview or referral is done. Because you can't write a highly specific job app for one person until you know exactly

    • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday April 29, 2015 @09:42PM (#49582615)

      My Immigration Law professor taught me that's how you write an H1-B job description. That's why I can't buy the "we can't find any American workers" defense, because the law skirting is so common it's now standard curriculum for lawyers.

    • by Antique Geekmeister ( 740220 ) on Wednesday April 29, 2015 @09:52PM (#49582665)

      The classic video of how employers can commit H1B fraud is at:

                          https://www.youtube.com/watch?... [youtube.com]

      What they describe is how to skirt the law, but still hire the less expensive H1B that an employer wants. to quote:

      "Our goal, clearly, is not to find a qualified and interested US worker."

    • by TheGratefulNet ( 143330 ) on Wednesday April 29, 2015 @09:55PM (#49582679)

      so, you admit openly to brazenly breaking the law?

      please turn yourself in and the rest of your firm.

      (I do hate you, you are scum for selling out your own people. and like the cops that turn a blind eye on the thin blue line, you are just as guilty of helping to ruin the middle classs as those cops are of protecting their own even when laws are being broken by them).

      its scumbags like you that nod, smile and keep letting the system crush our country.

      and yes, I'm one of those who has been out of work WAY too long because I'm a white guy in the bay area and that means I'm 'too expensive'. people like you have helped keep me OUT of work.

      I hold you responsible for a part of it. how do you sleep at night? dammit!!

      • by speedlaw ( 878924 ) on Wednesday April 29, 2015 @10:19PM (#49582813) Homepage
        I was only the piano player. I did all the non immigration work there. I'm only reporting what I saw. Would it be better if I didn't report it ? I never appeared in any Imm proceedings, or drafted the paperwork, personally. Immigration is generally a very effed up area of law. All the illegals aren't wrong...they know there will be eventual amnesty, like in the past, and will show up with coffee cans full of cash to pay whatever penalty fee the INS comes up with.
      • You're in the Bay Area and out of work? Fuck, they're hiring here like it's 1999. If you don't have a job right now, it's your own problem.

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward

      The best way to deal with this nonsense would be to sell the H1-B visas at auction, like taxi cab medallions, with the number adjusted each year so that the average price of each auctioned H1-B visa exceeds 400% of the federal poverty line for a family of 4 with that reserve price set as the starting bid for each H1-B visa. It's hard to say how much an H1-B is worth to a company that says that it needs them, so lets find out in a public auction. Force companies put their money where their mouths are.

    • by fightinfilipino ( 1449273 ) on Wednesday April 29, 2015 @10:12PM (#49582777) Homepage

      IAAL. Learned in a stint at an immigration law firm, that H1B means you write a job description that only your candidate can fill. For example, if I wanted an airplane engineer who knew jumbo jets, I could get a thousand Americans for the job. If I needed a jumbo jet guy who also could work on Bleriot biplanes, that might be a lot less. If I also said he needed to be fluent in Mandarin and Farsi, I've just written an H1-B for my candidate. The key to success is making sure that only your guy can meet the job description that YOU create. Had a friend who was H1-B, even though he was raised in the states...he never bothered for the green card, took the easy way through school, etc. Had a falling out with his boss, and the H1-B went "poof". This essentially American had to relocate to Europe, and when he didn't self deport, was excluded for five years. H1-B means your employer owns your ass. Sadly, it is now a means to "on shore" a docile labor force.

      this is laughably inaccurate, to the point where i question if you're actually a lawyer.

      to satisfy the requirements for an H-1B, you have to show that the position you're filling 1) requires at minimum a bachelor's degree in a particular specialty, and 2) your candidate has at least that bachelor's degree, or the equivalent. the process is based on the actual, real position the company is filling, NOT the other way around as you've just described. the burden is on the employer to prove that the bona fide position is an H-1B specialty occupation. read INA 214(i)(3) and 22 CFR 655.700 to 655.855, if you haven't already (hint: if you were even touching H-1Bs as a lawyer, this is MANDATORY READING, especially the LCA provisions!).

      what you've described is...not the H-1B process. it's what more unscrupulous companies try to do with the PERM Labor Certification process for a green card, where they inevitably run into, and get smacked down by, the U.S. Department of Labor.

      so there's three possibilities here: a) you're not actually a lawyer, because you have NO IDEA what you are talking about; b) you're a lawyer, but your practice was poor to the point of outright malpractice; or c) you're a lawyer, you're lying about what you are doing, and you should give me your name now so i can report you for an ethics violation under the model rules and your state's bar's ethics rules.

  • by MeNeXT ( 200840 ) on Wednesday April 29, 2015 @09:24PM (#49582523)

    That's how it seems to me. God bless America but not Americans.

  • by LifesABeach ( 234436 ) on Wednesday April 29, 2015 @09:25PM (#49582529)
    Why does America still wallow in a recession? It is by those that beat the drum for the H1B harvest.
  • by Chalnoth ( 1334923 ) on Wednesday April 29, 2015 @09:31PM (#49582549)
    The complaint is that companies are hiring people from outside the US because they can pay them less. The answer to that is simple: crack down on wage discrimination.
  • by whoever57 ( 658626 ) on Wednesday April 29, 2015 @09:31PM (#49582553) Journal

    The H1-B program should be changed such that only the company that is the end recipient of the work product of the H1-B worker can apply for a visa.

    Those companies that provide on-site engineers to other companies should not qualify for H1-B visa sponsorship. In this way many abuses would be stopped.

    • by clovis ( 4684 )

      The H1-B program should be changed such that only the company that is the end recipient of the work product of the H1-B worker can apply for a visa.

      Those companies that provide on-site engineers to other companies should not qualify for H1-B visa sponsorship. In this way many abuses would be stopped.

      Indeed, that would help a lot.
      Also, in my dream world, the hiring companies that claims they have a need for H1-B workers must apply to some agency (federal or NGO) for their H1-B employees.
      That agency would have on file resumes of any US citizen workers that are interested in having their resumes on file as well as the H1-B applicants.
      The agency would be mandated to to send US citizens from the pool as applicants for interviews, and not until all qualified or semi-qualified citizens (that wanted the job) h

    • It'd help in many ways, but it also makes the H1-Bs situation far more precarious. Modern abuse and quotas means almost all H1-Bs come from those nasty companies, but even before that, many people chose contracting firms to handle their immigration because you are far safer from layoffs and such. I remember when I was an H1-B, a long time ago, going direct, and my then employer had round after round of layoffs. The moment I saw the pattern, I had to look for another job IMMEDIATELY, because getting hit by o

  • Cost cutting? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by phantomfive ( 622387 ) on Wednesday April 29, 2015 @09:32PM (#49582563) Journal

    The fired workers believe the primary motivation behind Disney's action was cost-cutting.

    Is there anyone who believes that wasn't the primary motivation? Even the corporate spin: "focus on future innovation" is standard corporate-speak for "spending money elsewhere."

    It's not even 'spin,' that is the most straightforward way to interpret Disney's corporate statement.

  • by Joe_Dragon ( 2206452 ) on Wednesday April 29, 2015 @09:39PM (#49582593)

    With out them we can be replaced by contractors and it's the contract firm that is the one useing the H1B's

    • With out them we can be replaced by contractors and it's the contract firm that is the one useing the H1B's

      Problem with that is you that you would create the Walmart effect. Go Google Walmart closes dozens of stores? Why? Local unions won in 4 states. All of the sudden they mysteriously had to close due to plumbing issues for 4 months at a time in the same areas. Uh how did that happen?

      There are so many IT positions available and not enough jobs that unions are not needed. Ask any recruiter and he or she will tell you how hard it is to find someone that can even hold onto a job for more than1 year as everyone is

  • by bjwest ( 14070 ) on Wednesday April 29, 2015 @09:41PM (#49582605)

    Seriously, this H-1B shit needs to stop now. Until we're at 99% employment rate for whatever field we're importing workers for, they need to be shipped back to whatever country they came from. This is worse than the illegal imigrant, because these guys are diaplacing current American workers and taking jobs we have people dyeing to fill.

    Every single one of those fired need to get together and file a class action against Disney, and this needs to be posted all over the social sites. Disney is no more a family company than Jack the Ripper was an exceptional lover. This needs to backlash on them, and hard.

  • How can any company have a position which "can only be filled by H-1B workers when no qualified American — at any wage — can be found to fill the position"?

    With a high enough salary, any position can be filled, so unless companies are expected to get into bidding wars and offer multi million dollar salaries to compete for one of the american workers that could fill the position, how can such a policy be enforced? My company hires a lot of H1-B's (typically PhD's from various European countries),

  • 1. Don't volunteer (make them pay for every bit of effort)
    2. Don't apologise (never admit mistakes in writing)
    3. Don't resign (they have to fire you)
    4. Always maximise outside options and minimise local effort

  • no english heard? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by TheGratefulNet ( 143330 ) on Wednesday April 29, 2015 @10:07PM (#49582759)

    quoting this wonderful gem:

    Several of these workers, in interviews, said they didn't want to appear as xenophobic, but couldn't help but to observe, as one did, that "there were times when I didn't hear English spoken" in the hallways. As the layoff date neared, "I really felt like a foreigner in that building," the worker said.

    I'll go ahead and name names: I used to work at cisco. I have said many times that I could walk down the hallway at any random cisco san jose building and for most of the day, not hear a single word spoken in english (in hallways or breakrooms).

    is this what we want to see IN AN AMERICAN COMPANY??

    I don't dislike indians. I like the culture, love the food, think people from india are fine and decent, overall. but why should it be 'normal' to walk down the hallway of a san jose, california company and not hear english for hours and hours at a time?

    I should have had a gopro cam or something on me and taped what a typical day was like, there (when I still worked there; they canned my ass not too long ago). I would then send a copy to the congresscritters who think that there are not ENOUGH foreign workers in the US. maybe they want me to go a full week between hearing english in an american company?

    if I go thru an interview and hear 'not a cultural match' one more time, I swear to zeus I'm going to go postal. I'm nearly at the end of my rope, here....

  • by fredc97 ( 963879 ) on Wednesday April 29, 2015 @10:31PM (#49582877)

    H1B visas rules should first apply to CEOs then downward to that organization. No company really needs an expensive CEO, they cost a lot and no large company has ever closed when their CEO died in a car crash, so they are expendable. Get a new CEO at a fraction of the cost and benefits, that's even better shareholder value.

  • Lesson 1 (Score:4, Insightful)

    by dbIII ( 701233 ) on Wednesday April 29, 2015 @11:08PM (#49583075)
    Lesson 1 - try not to work in a place where they use fucking stupid euphemisms for employees such as "cast members".
    It's a bit of a clue that either employees are not valued as long term staff or that somewhere there is a total idiot drafting policies insisting on what employees with be called.
    "But it's showbusiness!" someone may exclaim - but no that does not fit because camera operators etc are not "cast members" - which means this is some weird shit for appearance sake and other arbitrary shit is bound to happen.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday April 29, 2015 @11:34PM (#49583203)

    Dear friends

    I'm posting as an anonymous for obvious reasons, but wanted to share some inside view on this subject. To qualify my comments, I lived in South America working for North American and European based companies as a consultant, being paid USD 90.00/hour (so 14.4K/month == 172K/year). I credit my involvement with Opensource as the main reason to be well paid even though not leaving in USA at time.

    I always admired USA and still believe this is a good country, even though is no longer the best country to live when compared to some countries in Europe (e.g. Germany, France, Finland).

    About 2 years ago I decided to migrate to USA, mostly to provide my child the opportunity to learn how to speak good and proper English (with American accent). My starting pay was 200K/year, so, not within the stereotype of cheap labor and local job stealer that is so common here in Slashdot.

    The H1B visa was the only way to move to USA. Calling to kill the program will just push away talented people that might otherwise being working and paying taxes in USA. That being said, I feel disgusted to know that several companies exploit the program to get cheap labor and I believe this must be stopped.

    One common misconception is to believe that you can always find local people to do the job. Well, boys... that might be true for trivial jobs (like IT support), but is exactly the opposite for elite jobs (e.g. linux kernel, WebKit/Blink, Gstreamer, etc).

    For those elite jobs, most of the people is already taken (e.g. Apple, Google). And the remaining people is scattered around the world, being just a few who are willing to move to USA.

    Another common misconception is to think you can 'just train' the locals to do it. Nopes... it takes several years to make an elite programmer that is a maintainer in one of those aforementioned Opensource projects.

    Maybe you are considering that instead of going through the H1B, I should have applied for a GreenCard (GC)? Well, I have a close friend, PhD and one of the top 20 experts in his domain area that was living in Australia and applied for a GC... that was 3 years ago and only now he will be able to move to USA.

    To close my message, I would like to tell that it may be the minority, but there are indeed some really good engineers/programmers that depend on the H1B program to move to USA and later apply for a GC if planning to stay longer, which, to be quite honest, I'm a bit unsure if it is worthwhile considering that:

    a) Your wife won't be able to work;
    b) You pay taxes and social security in a European level and get South American level services in return;
    c) Life in USA is quite expensive;
    d) This country is becoming less and less democratic by the day.

    Cheers

    AnonymousCoward

    • by TheGratefulNet ( 143330 ) on Thursday April 30, 2015 @07:25AM (#49584419)

      sorry, but I have to call BS on the 'its mostly about the elite programmers'. it SHOULD be about the specialty fields or where exceptional experience is needed and some researcher from a foreign country is the only expert who can do this job, that's fine.

      what I have seen (been living in the bay area 25 years; born in the US and lived here all my life; and, yes, I have travelled outside the US) is that the jobs that are being filled by h1b's (at cisco, for example, where I -used- to work) are ordinary common jobs. I have met some very sharp folks who where h1b but also lots of very inexperienced, shabby programmers who created more work as clean-up after them than they added during their stay.

      I mostly apply for 'regular old' programming jobs, these days. I consider myself average or a bit above, but certainly not genius level. I'm capable and I can usually get the job done or at least escalate if I'm stuck. but even for the common jobs, I'm being pushed aside in preference for the h1b. I see it at interviews. I see it when I am working, the ability level and experience level of those around me. we can all see it, its not hard. and we all know that its not the high-end programmer that we mostly import. its the common guy, and I have to tell you, lots of us 'common guys' are out of work and companies simply won't hire us because we are not as abusable as foreigners. plain and simple, cut and dried for you.

      I understand you have needs and your family is important to you. but why should my country spend more time and energy supporting YOU instead of ME? I don't expect YOUR country to support me or take care of me. I don't expect country A or B or C to support me. I DO expect my own damned country to prefer its own people be working here, getting the rewards of their life-long investment in the place and helping to make the next generation of americans even better off than their parents.

      that brings up another sore point. am I better off than my parents generation? I'm mid 50's and I still don't own my own house. I make (or made, when I was still working) a nice figure in the $100-$200k range. but in the bay area, its really hard to afford to buy a house if you didn't have help, and with employers throwing you under the bus every other year, no bank wants to loan money to a 'contractor' who has 'uncertain employment'. therefore, I'm a renter and may never have the chance to buy my own home. my parents grew up in the WW2 era and they made a fraction (translated) of what I make/made. but they owned their own home, could afford to have kids and treat them well, they didn't worry about 'will I be working again next year' like I do, pretty much all the time, now. they had a retirement and pension and overall they had many things I will never have.

      I'm worse off than my parents' generation, overall. and its not looking like its going to improve any time soon.

      so WHY should I - and people like me - just hand over my country to visitors? again, would your home country willingly accept me? my country is accepting you. where do *I* go?

      you have to understand the feelings of those who invested their whole lives here, only to be told 'sorry, social contract is now off.'

    • by rch7 ( 4086979 ) on Thursday April 30, 2015 @09:24AM (#49585377)

      There are E1 and E2 immigrant visas for your case. I.e.:
      E1 1: Persons with extraordinary ability in the sciences, arts, education, business, or athletics. Applicants in this category must have extensive documentation showing sustained national or international acclaim and recognition in their fields of expertise.
      E1 2: Outstanding professors and researchers with at least three years experience in teaching or research, who are recognized internationally.
      E2 1: Professionals holding an advanced degree (beyond a baccalaureate degree), or a baccalaureate degree and at least five years progressive experience in the profession.
      E2 2: Persons with exceptional ability in the sciences, arts, or business. Exceptional ability means having a degree of expertise significantly above that ordinarily encountered in the sciences, arts, or business.

      If you or your employer can't meet E1/E2 requirements, sorry, maybe there is nothing so special about your skills.
      H1B or L temporary worker visas are fraud and abuse most of the time, that can't be controlled and should end completely. They destroy any incentive for US persons to pursue career in IT or in STEM in general.

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