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Security Crime United States

Anonymous Slovenia Claims To Have Hacked the FBI and Posted Emails To Pastebin 152

Posted by samzenpus
from the have-some-info dept.
concertina226 writes "The information, posted by user Black-Shadow of the Slovenian branch of the hacktivist group, purportedly contains FBI domain email addresses and passwords for 68 agents, although the user claims in his post that the collected log-in details are 'not all ours'. The post also includes a short profile on FBI director James Brien Comey Jr, including sensitive information such as his date of birth, his wife's name, the date they got married, his educational history and even the geographical coordinates of his residence."
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Anonymous Slovenia Claims To Have Hacked the FBI and Posted Emails To Pastebin

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  • by ShanghaiBill (739463) on Monday February 03, 2014 @04:30PM (#46143915)

    ... sensitive information such as his date of birth, his wife's name, the date they got married, his educational history and even the geographical coordinates of his residence.

    None of that is "sensitive" information. You can get all of that from public records, or from someone's Linkedin home page.

    • Cue the turf war with Silicon Valley. Illegally collecting American's data is their job. Releasing it to the public for free is just plain un-american.

      • by gstoddart (321705)

        Releasing it to the public for free is just plain un-american.

        Good thing they were Slovenian.

        • by Anonymous Coward
          So we can drone their asses?
      • by pepty (1976012)
        Hence the proposal to have a 3rd party hold all of the data NSA collects. If more profits are made it's all good?
      • Well the government already knows everything about me thanks to the federal and state tax returns I file every year. Add in my property records and drivers license and they have all they need if they really want to get in touch.

    • by Etherwalk (681268)

      ... sensitive information such as his date of birth, his wife's name, the date they got married, his educational history and even the geographical coordinates of his residence.

      None of that is "sensitive" information. You can get all of that from public records, or from someone's Linkedin home page.

      The geographical coordinates of his residence are almost certainly not. People at that level in National Security conceal the address of their residences from the public for good reason.

      • It's been 30 years since someone figured out how to bounce a laser off a window and hear conversations.

      • by jfengel (409917) on Monday February 03, 2014 @04:56PM (#46144173) Homepage Journal

        They don't put it on their Facebook accounts, but it's not treated like a matter of national security. They buy and sell their houses, and drive to work in their cars, same as everybody else. They don't expect it to be secret, and it would be practically impossible to keep it secret.

        Most of them don't even have personal security guards. I imagine that most of them have home alarms, but it's likely not all that different from many other people who live in the upper-middle-class neighborhoods of DC.

        • Employees of armed federal agencies depend to a large extent on the rest of the armed federal agency and the implicit promise that "if you mess with one of ours, you mess with all of us." Federal agencies have acquired a certain aroma of lawlessness when it comes to avenging their own, thanks in large part to Hollywood, but aided and abetted by them any time Hollywood comes asking for an adviser. That and there are news reports of just enough jack-booted thuggery that people assume all the rest of it is t

      • by tibit (1762298)

        Bullshit. It should be available in the county land records database, online and for free, for crying out loud. Unless he lives in some real boonies.

        • by Whorhay (1319089)

          Yeah, I always figured they were public record but never realized how easy it was to find for free online until I bought a house. I periodically google my own name and one of the hits was a government site for figuring out if your home was in a flood zone. You could feed the site any address and it would list the property owner. Now that isn't to say that you couldn't use a dummy corporation or something to hold ownership of the house for you but I doubt many people go that far.

        • by lgw (121541)

          Land records only show who owns a house (which can easily be an LLC) not who lives there.

          • by tibit (1762298)

            Sure, but most people live in the houses they own :)

            • by lgw (121541)

              Most people have no compelling need to obfuscate their home address. Regardless, I'd bet that if you went to county records to figure out where a federal judge lived, not only would you not find out, but you'd find yourself answering questions from armed men in bad suits soon enough.

              • by tibit (1762298)

                For $50-$100 you can do it without having to go anywhere. There are companies that aggregate all that data :)

    • I have friends with secret jobs. They are not allowed to have accounts on social media sites for exactly that reason.

      • You've got the wrong friends. So do they.
        • You think I should ditch friends of 20 years because they got a job with the government?

          • In these times, yes. I would surely call a long-time friend to reason if he took, or turned out to have taken, a "secret" job with the US government. And if he would not take heed of my arraignments, I would end the friendship. There is a time to plant, and there is a time to uproot, says some 2500-year old wisdom.
            • Wow. You're a huge douche.

              • by mythosaz (572040)

                Don't worry, he's not from Earth, he's from IdealWorld, where, fortunately for the color-blind, things are all in black and white.

              • "The free states [...] which had embraced the cause of Rome were rewarded with a nominal alliance, and insensibly sunk into real servitude."

                ( Gibbon, "History of the decline and fall of the Roman Empire" )

                In spite of and in contradiction with the USA's touting democracy all over the earth, quite the contrary has happened, what with the lost wars in Vietnam, Iraq, Afghanistan. A mere shimmer of lustre, originating in an American Dream that was all but superficial rhetoric, managed to shine over Europe during the decades of the Cold War. But since 1989, two and a half decades of gradually worsening debt, surveillance and fear-mongering have op

                • Wow. You're a poetic douche who doesn't know shit about modern America or ancient Rome.

                  • Instead of reviling me without argument, rather rebuke me with reason. In the absence of which I stand my ground, albeit insulted.
      • by Whorhay (1319089) on Monday February 03, 2014 @05:16PM (#46144397)

        I've never seen someone with a clearance that wasn't allowed to have a social network account because of the job. I have however known a lot of people that don't have such accounts because it is just one more thing to worry about when a clearance review rolls around. Technically speaking though I think that even accounts like the ones we are using here are supposed to be disclosed as "Alliases" in your clearance paperwork.

      • by s.petry (762400)

        This is not a mandate, this is a training that people receive. We could have all the social media accounts we wanted when I worked for the DOD. We received weekly broadcasts reminding us not to put information regarding our jobs on those sites for our own safety.

        "Not allowed" implies that there is some sort of regulation in place preventing people from having a social media account which is untrue.

    • This is one of the reasons I have a problem with all those resume-blasting sites. It's one thing to have all that information about yourself sent to a handful of interested companies. It's completely different to have it indexed for any google search or shmucks to set up some phishing operation. OT: I used to regularly get phishing phone calls people (sounded like they were calling from their apartment) using just this kind of information in an attempt to sound legitimate.

      • by tibit (1762298)

        If you live in the U.S., posting the same stuff on social networking sites is frankly said just wasted effort. It is all a matter of public record, and anyone willing can look it up. Heck, there are even companies who regularly get this data from every fucking single public entity in the U.S. and collate them in databases. The access to those is provided as a paid-for service, but the prices are nothing to write home about. $50-$100 will find anyone overtly owning real estate anywhere in the U.S.

    • Reading Wikipedia (for all but the last item) is just about within the abilities of the typical Anonymous.

    • by citizenr (871508)

      It is sensitive and you will get prosecuted for posting it _if_ you live in US and those are royalty details. By royalty I mean upper echelons of power, not some cattle citizens.

  • But if he put a wedding announcement in his local paper, it's hardly sensitive information.

  • Will someone just post the pastebin link so we can look at judge for ourselves?

    • by Anonymous Coward

      http://pastebin.com/Luw2XsP2
      see also
      http://pastebin.com/Eyn23wXm

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