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Senators Push To Preserve NSA Phone Surveillance 252

Posted by samzenpus
from the works-for-them dept.
cold fjord writes "The New York times reports that the Chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, Senator Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), and Vice Chairman, Senator Saxby Chambliss (R-GA), are moving a bill forward that would 'change but preserve' the controversial NSA phone log program. Senator Feinstein believes the program is legal, but wants to improve public confidence. The bill would reduce the time the logs could be kept, require public reports on how often it is used, and require FISA court review of the numbers searched. The bill would require Senate confirmation of the NSA director. It would also give the NSA a one week grace period in applying for permission from a court to continue surveillance of someone that travels from overseas to the United States. The situation created by someone traveling from overseas to the United States has been the source of the largest number of incidents in the US in which NSA's surveillance rules were not properly complied with. The rival bill offered by Senators Wyden (D-OR) and Udall (D-CO) which imposes tougher restrictions is considered less likely to pass."
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Senators Push To Preserve NSA Phone Surveillance

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  • Fire them. (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday September 27, 2013 @03:07AM (#44968103)

    They're not representing the people and therefore undemocratic. Fire them.

    • Re:Fire them. (Score:4, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward on Friday September 27, 2013 @03:14AM (#44968125)

      I would. The problem is I don't think they'll listen to me and I'd probably be arrested if I call the cops to try and forcefully remove them from office.

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward
      You pussy Americans need to stand up and use your right to bare arms to resolve the situation!
      • by Anonymous Coward on Friday September 27, 2013 @07:44AM (#44969085)

        I don't think sleeveless shirts will help the situation, but thanks for trying.

        • I don't think sleeveless shirts will help the situation, but thanks for trying.

          But how else will I show of 'Mah gunz'!

          Oh yeah, welcome to the gun show ladies.

      • Re:Fire them. (Score:5, Insightful)

        by morgauxo (974071) on Friday September 27, 2013 @10:08AM (#44970355)

        Prove that we didn't elect them. Prove that the elections are all rigged. Then I would support, even join such a move.

        Until then baring arms against elected officials would just be a subversion of democracy. Who would take their place? Those who fight against the people's will by removing their chosen leaders? That would lead to tyrany for sure.

        Until then all there is to do is try to vote for the best lizards we can with lots of facepalms over who our felow citizens keep chosing.

        • Re:Fire them. (Score:5, Insightful)

          by TheCarp (96830) <sjc@@@carpanet...net> on Friday September 27, 2013 @10:48AM (#44970847) Homepage

          Actually I would submit the election system is so terribly set up that it barely deserves to be called one. We have a great system, for a world where it takes weeks to get information a few hundred miles, and the number of states and subjects are a fraction of what we have today.

          What has happened, with the expansion of territory, increase in population, and indroduction of mass media, is that representation has become an utter joke.

          It comes down to issues as basic as the voting system itself. A single non-transferable vote system creates the situation where a two party stranglehold is inevitable. Two parties are barely good enough for a small community. In fact the very structure of the non-ranked vote, gives more power to the parties.

          For the most part Democrats are not people who believe in the Democrat platform, shit, most have never read it and few know more than a few of its more basic points. They are, the people afraid of the basic points the republicans make. The republicans, are basically the same, just with some of the issues switched.

          In a way, this works, if any party becomes too powerful, they stumble and fall as their member constituencies begin fighting with each other. However it means, nobody actually has an agenda that can be taken seriously because neither party has a real coalition, until they are behind and able to rally their members together out of fear of the other party.

          This is a democracy in name only, its really become a sham (it is debatable whether it always was, but, it came about in a context where it made more sense than it does today).

          • The funny thing in this case is that we're talking about US Senators, who weren't supposed to be directly elected in the first place (until the 17th Amendment). The way it should work is that Senators are chosen by the state legislature, in which case we'd be able to call up our state rep/state senator (who we actually can call up, because their constituencies are small enough that they'd have time to talk) and complain.

        • Prove that we didn't elect them. Prove that the elections are all rigged. Then I would support, even join such a move.

          Until then baring arms against elected officials would just be a subversion of democracy. Who would take their place? Those who fight against the people's will by removing their chosen leaders? That would lead to tyrany for sure.

          Until then all there is to do is try to vote for the best lizards we can with lots of facepalms over who our felow citizens keep chosing.

          It has been shown that the elections are rigged. http://blackboxvoting.org/ [blackboxvoting.org] Not all of them, all the time of course. But the big boys can put their thumb on the scale when it matters most.

    • Re:Fire them. (Score:5, Interesting)

      by joe user jr (230757) on Friday September 27, 2013 @05:55AM (#44968745)

      It would be no great surprise if voting on this bill went along the same lines as the congressional vote on reining in "the NSA’s phone-spying dragnet. It turns out that those 217 'no' voters received twice as much campaign financing from the defense and intelligence industry as the 205 'yes' voters. [wired.com]"

      In particular,

      Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), the chair of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, is married to Richard C. Blum, who was substantially invested in URS Corp, which owns EG&G, a leading government technical provider that has been awarded hundreds of millions of dollars in security-related contracts. Feinstein never abstained from voting when it affected her husband’s wallet and Blum made $100 million when he sold his shares, as investigative reporter Peter Byrne exposed in his 2007 series the “Feinstein Files [peterbyrne.info].”

      ( http://www.indypendent.org/2013/07/16/nsa-follows-you-we-follow-money [indypendent.org] )

      See also:

      Good luck firing them, though.

      • by Atzanteol (99067)

        Bingo. We need campaign finance reform first. It's not "the problem" but it needs to be solved before these other issues can be addressed.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by PRMan (959735)
      Are you kidding? The idiots in northern California will vote for her again because "she's a Democrat". It doesn't matter what she does, she'll get reelected. They voted for Jerry Brown for governor and he already bankrupted California twice in the past.
      • by drinkypoo (153816)

        Arnie for gov was the most awesome thing ever because none of the really fucked up stuff he wanted to do ever came to pass. I knew that this was what would happen, which is why I voted for him. I voted against Moonbeam but we got him again anyway because as you say, the voters of California are idiots. That's not entirely true, though; many of them are simply assholes. There's a lot of self-entitled rich fucks in California, it's not just self-entitled poor.

      • Re:Fire them. (Score:5, Informative)

        by dywolf (2673597) on Friday September 27, 2013 @09:12AM (#44969751)

        You do realize that most of the folks in Northern california fall under standard rural demographics, which leans to republican* right?
        You do realize that "Northern California" is not simply "everything north of LA" right ?
        You do realize that Senators don't have districts and are elected by the entire state right?
        You do realize that her power base is primarily San Francisco and the Southern California cities (LA metro, San Diego) right?

        (*Other than San Francisco and Hippy Central I mean Mt Shasta City)

      • I like this part:

        Senator Feinstein believes the program is legal, but wants to improve public confidence.

        IOW, she's just going to put a spin on how she presents the program to the public, no actual changes to the program itself are intended.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Saxby Chambliss has already announced his retirement. Thus, he is currently free to leverage his seniority and lame-duckness to act against the wishes of his constituents.

    • They don't represent Slashdot. However, Slashdot doesn't represent the US. Governments always reflect the greater wishes of the governed. Anyone who thinks that representatives passing stupid legislation isn't a direct reflection of the nature of the majority is probably a member of that majority.

      • Governments always reflect the greater wishes of the governed.

        What utter bullshit.

        Governments reflect the greater wealth/power for the individuals in the government. At least these days.

        Anyone who thinks that representatives passing stupid legislation isn't a direct reflection of the nature of the majority is probably a member of that majority.

        Yeah, because we all wanted to be spied on. How stupid are you?

        • by raymorris (2726007) on Friday September 27, 2013 @03:38PM (#44974227)

          It DOES reflect the majority of voters. The majority voted for Feinstein and all the rest. I've spoken to several people who think the NSA thing isn't a problem. They grow more concerned when I provide them some information about what the NSA has been doing.

          It's not that the majority wants to be spied on, it's that the majority is watching Dancing With the Stars. In some surveys, most people didn't know who the vice president was. Of those who DID know the vice president's name, around 40% say they get their news from Comedy Central.

          So about 15% of Americans read or watch news programs (South Park and Daily Show aren't news).

          The majority doesn't know what NSA stands for, and the nature of that majority is reflected in the government's actions.

             

    • Re:Fire them. (Score:5, Interesting)

      by TheCarp (96830) <sjc@@@carpanet...net> on Friday September 27, 2013 @10:37AM (#44970699) Homepage

      > They're not representing the people and therefore undemocratic. Fire them.

      Do you remember a few years back when Isreal invaded Lebanon? Shortly after that their own military put out a SCATHING report which absolutely skewered many people in the government, including elected officials.

      There was an interview about this on NPR with a war scholar at west point who was asked why you never see reports like this within the US or from the US military. His answer was simple: We have no mechanism by which to remove the incompetent, if they screw up there is no point in saying anything because you are stuck with them until their term runs out anyway

    • by Krojack (575051)

      Doesn't matter. Whoever their replacement is will be brainwashed within hours of taking office. They will never ever do what the people want anymore. It all about their personal pocketbooks and their family. When it comes to running again, they just start spewing lies out to the people for a few months to get re-elected then back to old business.

    • "...The last vestige of the old Republic has been swept away..."

      These criminals have been voting away Constitutional provision through simple majority and 2/3, statute-by-statute, since the end of the Civil War. This is just your 150-year end-game. It's too late, to stop it now,

      Just wait til you see what they do with this manufactured "Budget Crisis". Emergency powers people. With a little coterie of Feinstein/Leiberman style Senators as arse-cover, for "representation".

  • by canadiannomad (1745008) on Friday September 27, 2013 @03:12AM (#44968117) Homepage

    As a world traveler who is actively seeing many places, cultures and things let me tell you about my perspective... Nah, I better keep my mouth shut.

    Also who trusts FISA again??? The secret court that declares itself legal... I think I did that in the garage when I was 5.

    • by AHuxley (892839) on Friday September 27, 2013 @03:31AM (#44968183) Homepage Journal
      Re: Also who trusts FISA again?
      That was the debate the NSA and GCHQ always warned about historically and tried to stay out of books, politics, the press, courts for as long as they could in the ~1950-80's.
      Once any target population knows they are under active, long term domestic surveillance programs their telco/isp use changes.
      The classified programs and the brands are out now in public. How people interact and consume via the brands will be interesting to see.
      Trials with the domestic metadata 'lock box' could also prove legally interesting as skilled defence teams ask to see more and present more to open courts.
      • by ogdenk (712300)

        Trials with the domestic metadata 'lock box' could also prove legally interesting as skilled defence teams ask to see more and present more to open courts.

        It's only metadata until an algorithm finds you interesting.... then it's full-on logging on all communications.

        They fix the defense team problem by never admitting the NSA was involved and falsifying information basically saying a little birdie dropped the evidence off.

        The rules only matter when people play by them. If our government can run around committing felonies against the whole population (which I consider willful, blatant violation of the constitution a felony) then why can't I? If I attack peop

        • by AHuxley (892839)
          Yes if that metadata 'lock box' passes, thats your average productive 'phone/net' lifespan (60 years++) saved for any 'connection' any political party wants to track down "legally". Very police state chilling.
        • Are we not constitutionally bound to defend ourselves against such evil?

          Shush, Honey Boo Boo is on...

    • by abhisri (960175) on Friday September 27, 2013 @04:11AM (#44968363)

      What is the point of passing any bills or laws related to this? It is not like NSA is going to obey the laws in first place, which is the actual problem.

      If your government refuses to respect the very constitution that is supposed to give it its power in the first place, and do unconstitutional acts, your government's behavior is not so different from that of Pakistan's previous president Musharraf's imprisonment of all his political rivals during election and then declaring himself to be the "democratically elected representative".

      In the meanwhile, Americans continue debating between "republicans" v/s "democrats" and "Bush" v/s "Obama".

      • by AHuxley (892839)
        Re NSA is going to obey the laws in first place, which is the actual problem.
        The next legal move is what people may want to avoid. Facing a life long legal domestic metadata 'lock box' for use state or federal court at any time for any reason.
        Giving the domestically illegal enough color of law cover to present in a courtroom is the next chilling step.
      • Came here to say this. The NSA will at most only pretend to follow orders at this point. What do they have to fear?

    • by Dunbal (464142) * on Friday September 27, 2013 @06:13AM (#44968801)
      I got my perspective adjusted for me a few years ago when getting off an international flight in Miami. Three large policemen in body armor with assault rifles and with one of the most vicious looking black dog I have ever seen, standing at a "choke point" in the tunnels that lead from the plane to immigration. They stood in such a way that you had to pass near the dog, either on the right or the left.. And I thought to myself - this is the "new" America. Well I haven't been back. I plan on actively avoiding it if I can. They can dick around with other people.
    • by Krojack (575051)

      Kinda like how the US is 17 trillion in debt, can't pay for most things and threaten to shut down government putting families out of work yet congress can all agree within a few hours to give themselves a pay raise.

  • Damn it (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday September 27, 2013 @03:15AM (#44968127)

    Would someone fucking put Feinstein out of my misery already.

  • by gweihir (88907) on Friday September 27, 2013 @03:24AM (#44968155)

    Why do so few people understand that? The surveillance in totalitarian regimes is typically "legal", something being "legal" does not mean anything.

    You can in fact establish a totalitarian regime in an entirely legal way almost everywhere. Step one is to scare the population into irrationality ("terrorism" and other specters work nicely). Then you manipulate the supreme court (if you have one) into doing more and more bizarre interpretations of the constitution (if you have one). This has been going on for some while in the US. And finally you drop all pretense and make laws against "crimes" that place more and more people into that class (victim-less crimes work well here), so you can get rid easily of anybody you do not like. Allowing the use of random finds in searches, even when the original reason for the search turns out to be bogus (a truly despicable practice) helps, because everybody has something illegal that can be found with over-broad criminalization. Then scare the targets into a deal, so no judge or jury gets to examine the accusations.

    See, easy. And well under way in the US.

    • by dido (9125) <dido@@@imperium...ph> on Friday September 27, 2013 @03:29AM (#44968175)
      "Naturally the common people don't want war; neither in Russia, nor in England, nor in America, nor in Germany. That is understood. But after all, it is the leaders of the country who determine policy, and it is always a simple matter to drag the people along, whether it is a democracy, or a fascist dictatorship, or a parliament, or a communist dictatorship. Voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is to tell them they are being attacked, and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same in any country." -- Hermann Göring.
      • by TheP4st (1164315) on Friday September 27, 2013 @03:57AM (#44968295)

        "Naturally the common people don't want war; neither in Russia, nor in England, nor in America, nor in Germany.

        Unfortunately there is a billion dollar industry that do want war and combined with the all too prevalent revolving door politics little will change for the better anytime soon.

      • by gweihir (88907)

        Indeed. And it worked well in any day and age and does so today. People are generally too stupid to recognize the mechanism and being scared reduces effective intelligence and wisdom even further below the pathetic performance level the average human being is capable of.

        This guy was scum, but highly perceptive and insightful scum. The NSDAP has several others that fall into this class. It looks like their texts are held in high regard by the US political elite.

    • Absolutely right and on topic. "Legal" became very fashionable word for various organized crime rings within governments around the world.

      "The law" turned into another business venue which can be stretched to some shady organization or group of people liking. Add media ownership to that mix and any passages from the Constitution are not worth more than toilet paper.

      • by gweihir (88907)

        And make sure "the law" is a widely held fetish that many people use to replace concepts like "ethics", "responsibility", "right or wrong/shades of gray". This blinds them to the realities until it is too late.

    • by aaaaaaargh! (1150173) on Friday September 27, 2013 @04:47AM (#44968481)

      Let me add to this that the problem is not that the US is super-evil. Everybody knows that the US is not significantly more or less evil than most other civilized countries, just a bit more powerful. The problem is that when the mechanisms for abuse are in place, they will invariably be used for something evil one day or another. Perhaps not now, but who knows what happens in 20 years?

      • by berashith (222128)

        you are exactly right. The US is not more evil than other countries. The problem is that there has always been a myth pushed to the world that the US has a government of, by, and for the people, and because of this there will not be the same types of threats possible from the US that could come from a tyranical dictator. It is starting to appear that the government is opposed to its own people in many ways, and it is completely obvious that the government no longer reports to the people.

    • by Terry95 (2690775)
      All I can add is that by declaring a blatantly Unconstitutional act legal you cheapen the definition of both the term "legal" and the value of having a Constitution.

      Be careful what rights you give away. One day your children will bleed to get them back.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday September 27, 2013 @03:30AM (#44968181)

    America has a horrible habit of not learning from history. It is worrying to see obvious extremists like Feinstein, pushing through viciously totalitarian legislation of this type.
    Look at the German experience of these type of laws - first with the Nazis, then with the Stasi police state.
    What has been happening in America is FAR more reaching than either the Nazi or Stasi surveillance ever was. The American people need to act now, to move towards a democratic path. It will be a difficult journey after such a long period of ruthless totalitarian government. It will require rebuilding of all the fundemental institutions of the state, to be free of corruption, and to be free of corporate interference. I hope for the sake of ordinary americans, that they can cast aside the corrupt regime, before it is too late, and their country implodes.

    • by getuid() (1305889) on Friday September 27, 2013 @03:50AM (#44968255) Homepage

      Nah, too early. Most people, out of lack of personal experience, aren't yet terrified enough of a totalitatian govt. thus don't quite know why and how to love a proper functioning democracy.

      Wait another decade or so, it will be easier then. More bloody, and will require more work, but there'l be more hands to help.

      Cheers

  • by SuricouRaven (1897204) on Friday September 27, 2013 @05:02AM (#44968517)

    Crypto-anarchism.

    Victory through mathematics!

  • by HangingChad (677530) on Friday September 27, 2013 @05:06AM (#44968521) Homepage

    The bill would reduce the time the logs could be kept, require public reports on how often it is used, and require FISA court review of the numbers searched.

    Riiiight. The organization that lied to Congress, lied to the FISA Kangaroo Court, and then lied to the public when they got caught is going to suddenly be cowed by tweaking the law.

    They should call this the Whitewash Amendment.

  • by Bruce66423 (1678196) on Friday September 27, 2013 @05:14AM (#44968545)
    Given that their behaviour is grossly inconsistent with their other political views, one is forced to the conclusion that the NSA has got some means of coercion to get them to propose this.
    • by geekmux (1040042)

      Given that their behaviour is grossly inconsistent with their other political views, one is forced to the conclusion that the NSA has got some means of coercion to get them to propose this.

      This might make sense, if those being coerced were actually in a position of influence. They are above the law, and smear campaigns don't work anymore due to the average sheeples attention span.

      If you need further evidence, let me refer you to the collective criminal records of our esteemed lawmakers who kept their jobs and their felonies. People forget come voting time. Over and over again.

      Don't worry though, I'm sure Amendment #28 is just around the corner, which will simply state that "Congress shall

    • Gee, ya think?

      Pols have been cowed by their own skeletal closet contents since the days of Allen Dulles and J. Edgar Hoover.

      That is why nothing short of a complete and thorough housecleaning (don't hold your breath), or a complete systemic collapse of the Establishment's economic oligarchy (in my dreams), will avail.

  • I'm so glad that Senator Feinstein believes that this is a legal program that just needs a few "tweaks".

    It will make it very easy for her to understand when she is fired for not following the basic tenants she swore to uphold, as documented within the Constitution and our Bill of Rights.

    If we're going to keep ignoring these documents over and over again, then the next thing we should initiate is a complete erasure of these topics in the public school system. I certainly see no point in teaching students ab

    • Yeah, because the two vastly Democrat urban areas in California are going to vote Republican to toss a senator. I wish you were correct, but right now people vote for the brand, and not the policy.

      And the Republican brand is only slightly better than Enron in California.

      • by fritsd (924429)
        Yes, because there are only two political parties in California, the Democrats and the Republicans.


        <rant>
        Oh wait.. maybe that's actually true. I'm not American so I wouldn't know.

        But from an outsider perspective, the fact that your Political Party of Power has more than 90% of the vote (about equally split between the slightly-more-right PPP-Republian wing and the slightly-more-left PPP-Democrat wing), is in fact your largest problem. You need a political party that promises just *ONE* thing: to r
  • by Coward Anonymous (110649) on Friday September 27, 2013 @05:36AM (#44968631)

    It's too convenient an escape hatch for anything the government wants to sweep under the rug.

  • Bizness as usual (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Kazoo the Clown (644526) on Friday September 27, 2013 @07:51AM (#44969119)
    "Let's say we did something so that we can start pretending things are different."
  • by Lumpy (12016)

    I just cant get over how the worst enemies of this country are the ones we elected.

    These are EVIL men, everyone needs to write their congresscritters and tell them how they do NOT support the actions of these Evil senators who want to permanently destroy our freedom.

    Sadly, I know I am in the minority and that most of you think that all this domestic spying is a good thing.

  • by WOOFYGOOFY (1334993) on Friday September 27, 2013 @08:26AM (#44969333)

    The bill would require Senate confirmation of the NSA director.

    So this Senator's solution to "reform" is to give more power to herself and that respected, august body of dispassionate reason and good judgement, the Senate.

    Yet she has no problem with the FISA rubberstampers being the final overseer.

    Why am I surprised?

    I voted for Feinstein many times, but you know what? She needs to go. She needs to lose her job because she's nothing but an ossified and unoriginal thinker in times which call for a radical re-thinking of the relationship between privacy, security and liberty.

    She's 80 years old and she doesn't "get" the modern world anymore. The times she';s legislating for are now officially over and the post 9-11, post apocalyptic global terrorism, post-Snowden times are what we have now have to sort out. She's doddering around commanding her staffers to tweak things here and there and move a few chairs around .

    She is part of the go-along-to-get-along business as usual crows that has failed us and brought us to this point. Time to go. Enjoy your gold-plated Senate healthcare retirement benefits.

    • by drinkypoo (153816)

      I voted for Feinstein many times,

      Why? Why the fuck would you have done that? She's been an unabashed opponent of the constitution all along. Now you want a medal for waking up to what the rest of us have been saying about her for fucking decades?

    • I voted for Feinstein many times, but you know what?

      YOU !! It was you!! Over the past few years, I've been wondering, who the FUCK votes for people like this?

      Feinstein's involvement with the Senate Intelligence Committee has been a joke ever since this NSA shit hit the fan, but her history of being a fucking idiot goes back at least to 1994 when she authored the original "scary looking gun" bill, the Federal Assault Weapons Ban that outlaws guns based solely on cosmetic, non-functional features. She has also consistently voted to extend the Patriot Act,

  • Every nation gets the government it deserves.

    A government program that feels its duty is to review the contents of every American email, phone call, and SMS, regardless of such superficial things like 'warrants'? You own it, Americans. After decades of inviting the federal government to fix your problems, this is what you get. From the Midwest corn farmers enjoying their subsidies to the inner city food-stamp-reared-baby-machines, Americans have sold themselves for pennies on their liberty. Worse, yo
  • And who is expecting other outcome than this ? Frankly, I don't expect them paying attention to citzenry at all. Growing political isolation (as we see in Syria case or latest UN meeting) might have bigger impact (either good or bad - no one knows).
  • I have a better idea, which I shall propose here.

    I propose that the NSA be allowed to wiretap phone calls and keep logs of phone calls when they have either a) a court-issued warrant or b) direct and verifiable probable cause. In fact I think there is some old document, words scribbled on parchment that were mumbling something about court oversight over the government prohibiting unreasonable search and seizures, but perhaps I'm just a radical extremist and only imagined the whole thing.

  • Just how badly do these people want to be lynched by angry mobs? Are they daring us to stand up to them? Or do they live in such a bubble that they think the American people will take their abuse forever?

  • LOL (Score:5, Interesting)

    by kilfarsnar (561956) on Friday September 27, 2013 @11:11AM (#44971077)

    Senator Feinstein believes the program is legal, but wants to improve public confidence.

    That made me chuckle. Sorry Senator, once you've been caught hiding things people are going to think you are still hiding things even if you're not. That's how the loss of trust works. You see, we don't trust you or the NSA anymore. As a wise man once said, fool me once shame on you, fool me can't get fooled again. So there will be no improvement of confidence amongst thinking people. The NSA spies on us and lied about it. It will take a long time of explicit good behavior for us to trust you or NSA again. And we all know that's not going to happen.

  • I don't think we can put the surveillance genie back in the bottle, and I fully understand why anyone involved in national defense would want to keep things just as they are.

    My primary concern is the lack of oversight. Or rather, the lack of *proof* of oversight. They could have the best oversight in the world and it wouldn't matter if it were all performed by secret courts.

    I'd be satisfied if they'd simply let people know when their records were being viewed for any reason, with a reasonable delay for on

  • Are very much needed to overcome SCOTUS rulings which appear to allow the collection of phone meta data. While it would be nice to see a liberal/progressive critter step up, they seem unlikely to grow a pair. That puts it on the likes of Lee, Paul or Amash.

    I would start with a very simple bill. "Phone call records are private information to be shared only with customer and company except by explicit search warrant with probably cause shown." That would get the rest of the fuckwads on record once and for all

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