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NVIDIA Kills Online Store In Response To Hacker Claims 70

Posted by Soulskill
from the have-you-tried-updating-your-drivers dept.
wiredmikey writes "Following a shutdown of its 'NVIDIA Developer Zone,' earlier this week after the online community for developers had been hacked, the graphics chip maker on Friday also shut down its online store. The group of hackers behind the attack, going by the handle of 'The Apollo Project,' made mention of the claimed compromise in its original post exhibiting its successful attack against the NVIDIA Developer Zone site. While the company has shut down the online store, it has not acknowledged that a successful attack has taken place. 'NVIDIA has suspended operation of the NVIDIA Gear Store (store.nvidia.com) as a precaution, following confirmed attacks on several of our other sites,' read a statement posted on the site posted. The claimed attackers wrote, 'We aren't acting extremely maliciously, we've used this database to target disgusting corporations who deserve to be brought to justice.. and we are getting there, slowly but surely.'"
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NVIDIA Kills Online Store In Response To Hacker Claims

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  • Vigilante circus. (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Ostracus (1354233) on Saturday July 14, 2012 @03:59PM (#40650643) Journal

    The claimed attackers wrote, 'We aren't acting extremely maliciously, we've used this database to target disgusting corporations who deserve to be brought to justice.. and we are getting there, slowly but surely.'"

    1-what crime?

    2-Who died and made them the long arm of the law?

    • by Jailbrekr (73837)

      Exactly. NVidia hasn't done anything of note except produce good video cards and GPUs.

      • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday July 14, 2012 @04:07PM (#40650697)

        Exactly. NVidia hasn't done anything of note except produce good video cards and GPUs.

        They must be disgruntled about 3DFX like I am.

        • by Errtu76 (776778)

          :)

          I can still remember my Diamond Monster 3D card, Then later added a second one with the SLI(?) cable. Good old times.

          • by DigiShaman (671371) on Saturday July 14, 2012 @04:56PM (#40650933) Homepage

            You must be talking about the Monster 3D II. The original Diamond Monster 3D was a Voodoo 1 card. SLI wasn't implemented until the Voodoo 2 series.

            Ok, turning back the wayback machine here. But here's a breakdown (from memory) of my old but much loved gaming rig. The year was late 1996

            CPU = Intel Pentium 166
            Motherboard = Biostar AT with 430FX chipset
            RAM = 24MB of EDO
            Audio = Sound Blaster AWE34 PnP (long ISA card with upgradable SIMM banks)
            Modem = USRobotics Sportster 33.6 (internal ISA card)
            Storage1 = 1GB Conner IDE HDD
            Storage2 = 4x CDROM IDE
            Storage3 = 3.25 1.44MB Floppy drive
            Video1 = Diamond Stealth64 Video S3-Vision968 PCI with 2MB (upgradable to 4MB) of VRAM.
            Video2 = Diamond Monster 3D
            Input = Microsoft serial mouse and some generic AT keyboard.

            That machine was a BOSS for its time. It owned all gaming back then. Never broke a sweat when playing Duke Nukem3D.

            Total cost = shitloads. Actually, I don't remember. My parents paid for the base build as a graduation present. I just paid for the gaming upgrades.

            • I think I've built upwards of 100 of those machines in my time as a young tech in a small computer store. Here in AU, something like that would have been in the $3000-$4000 range, depending on brands used. Such a glorious time in computers... for retailers.

            • If any of my computers had ever started sweating, I think I would have just quietly stood up, and backed away from the damned thing. Very quietly. And, backed very far away. Scary idea . . .

            • by Errtu76 (776778)

              Yep, Monster 3D II indeed. My primary card was the same as you, but I invested in a Gravis Ultrasound card for music since I liked the Assembly demoscene and that was a must have :)

              And I wanted a big harddisk so I spent about $600 on a 2G Quantum Bigfoot ;)

              I think my phone now has better specs than my system back then, but yeah, gaming ruled!

              Also I upgraded my mobo and CPU (a 486DX2-80) to a P1 133 MHz so I could play Moto Racer without a problem.

        • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

          by Anonymous Coward

          Exactly. NVidia hasn't done anything of note except produce good video cards and GPUs.

          They must be disgruntled about 3DFX like I am.

          3DFX has no one to blame for their downfall but themselves. (This is coming from a former 3DFX fanboy.)

          They blew a TON of cash buying the card maker STB, a manufacturer that had major quality issues.
          Their Direct X support was rubbish, instead they concentrated on Glide.
          They took waaaay too long to get the Voodoo 4/5 to market, and then another 6 months of paper release.
          And lastly they concentrated solely on the high end market. Nvidia made bank from their low cost Riva and TNT lines selling to OEMs which

          • To be fair, DirectX was still in it's infancy with version 2.0 that came with Window 95 OSR2. If you had the original version of Windows 95, DirectX was not included. It got installed with whatever application used it. Also, the Direct3D portion was extremely limited in functionality. Glide on the other hand was a very close cousin of OpenGL if I remember. In fact, a Voodoo1 card could run QuakeGL without trouble. Although it does beg the question as to why 3Dfx didn't just stick with OpenGL as the standard

      • Ha, you said good video cards!

        Sorry, I had to post it before someone else would. Really I don't hate on Nvidia, being second to AMD in the desktop gaming market has caught them a bit of flak, but they still perform great. And they're top when it comes to mobile graphics (not that mobile gaming is all that big a market).

        So alright, their marketing may be a bit overzealous, but that's no reason to hack them over. Hackers are probably just mad their nvidia cards melted when they figured out what overclockin

        • by Anonymous Coward

          Huh. I guess you haven't heard about the 5xx or 6xx lines of Nvidia cards? AMD's falling further and further behind, and as an avid supporter and exclusive buyer of AMD cards myself, I can understand why you're feeling defensive. But I'm afraid the benchmarks don't lie - AMD is in trouble.

          • Context doesn't lie either. They were second for a long time. Did I say, "catching some flak" or "caught some flak"?

            Another reason why grammar is important.

            • by Raenex (947668)

              Another reason why grammar is important.

              Indeed, which is why your post was wrong if you meant it to be in the past tense. I read it as the present tense because that's the way you wrote it.

              What you said: "Really I don't hate on Nvidia, being [present participle] second to AMD in the desktop gaming market has caught [present perfect] them a bit of flak, but they still perform great."

              What you should have said was: "Really I don't hate on Nvidia. Having been second to AMD in the desktop gaming market caught them a bit of flak, but they still perform

        • by EdIII (1114411)

          And they're top when it comes to mobile graphics

          As far as I am concerned they blow, at least in mobile.

          Lately I have been looking at high end laptops with docking ports capable of running multiple screens. They are marketed for engineers/CAD, etc. and specifically talk about and show multiple screen setups (docking port required of course). NVidia can't deliver. *Only* AMD delivers the multiple screens.

          NVidia can add thousands at the high end to the cost of the laptop as well, and not even add multiple screens. AMD is the bottom offering every time,

      • Exactly. NVidia hasn't done anything of note except produce good video cards and GPUs.

        ... And obscene gestures from Linus Torvards.

        Well, and me, for that matter. Although I think the main video glitches I see have something to with Flash already having mucked things up to begin with.

        Still, that's a "crime" that doesn't deserve quite that severe a punishment.

        • ... And obscene gestures from Linus Torvards.

          Which is why no Linux game player would EVER use an nVidia card, they all use ATI/AMD cards.

          Oh wait.

      • And wood screws.

    • by Mashiki (184564) <mashiki@gmail. c o m> on Saturday July 14, 2012 @04:16PM (#40650763) Homepage

      1-what crime?

      2-Who died and made them the long arm of the law?

      Despite that I'll be modded into oblivion for this. This isn't any different that what OWS protesters have been doing for months on end, and it hasn't been any different than what the student protesters have been doing in Quebec have been doing for months on end. In both cases they've been going off the deep end and getting more violent, believing that "corporations" or "schools" or "wall street" need to be brought to justice for crimes against who knows what. I'm sure the grievances are very valid in their minds, and whatever they tell themselves, or are being told by whatever professor or community organizer or handler is telling them to believe, but that doesn't make it so.

      As for the question of "who died and made them the long arm of the law?" Well that's obvious, they made themselves the long arm of the law. This is the pure anti-corporatism of the left.

    • by girlintraining (1395911) on Saturday July 14, 2012 @04:32PM (#40650843)

      1-what crime?

      Making profit.

      2-Who died and made them the long arm of the law?

      Nobody died and they aren't the law.

      This isn't vigilantism, this is simple defacement and theft. Vigilantism is motivated by a desire for justice, and a perceived indifference or selective enforcement of laws. They haven't stated what crimes NVidia should be held accountable for; which means there probably aren't any. Some examples of what 'proper' vigilantism might be motivated by would be illegal dumping of toxic waste, mistreatment of their workforce, manipulation of stock prices, colluding with other manufacturers to fix the prices of key information commodities, or excerting monopoly powers over a market.

  • by Pop69 (700500) <billy@nOspam.benarty.co.uk> on Saturday July 14, 2012 @04:05PM (#40650679) Homepage
    It's not just what's mentioned in the summary.
  • by Anonymous Coward

    target disgusting corporations who deserve to be brought to justice.

    So.... they pick nVidia, and NOT Google, Apple, Sony, or Microsoft?

    Seriously? nVidia isn't perfect, but they don't seem remotely as evil as the above four.

    • by Grave (8234)

      Hacking Sony isn't exactly impressive, or new. I don't think there is anything left of Sony that hasn't been hacked already.

      On the other hand, Google and Microsoft have sufficient security that any significant hack would be quite legendary. Dunno (or care) about Apple.

      • how exactly is Google being evil?

        they sell ads that pays for your use.

        they collect your information they do that to target adds to pay for your use of their service. don't like that don't use them. unlike a os or hardware you can switch services to any competitor with a couple key strokes, just type WWW.bing.com or WWW.ask.com or WWW.duckduckgo.com or WWW.yahoo.com etc,etc,etc...

        "but their scripts are embedded in web pages i visit" then talk to the page owners about it. maybe that i because they use them fo

  • Actual post (Score:5, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday July 14, 2012 @04:08PM (#40650713)
    • by Raenex (947668)

      So in summary, it's a bunch of dopey hackers justifying their actions because the world isn't perfect. *golf clap*

      Nevermind that these "disgusting corporations" give these turds the computers that they hack with and jobs to their parents so that they may live in their basements.

  • by svick (1158077) on Saturday July 14, 2012 @04:12PM (#40650745)

    Let me get this straight. They're not acting extremely maliciously, they're only acting very maliciously?

    • by Cinder6 (894572)

      That caught my attention, too. "I'm not going to murder you--I'm not that evil. But I will help myself to your stuff. Can I come in?"

  • Crazed idiocy (Score:2, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward

    What's disgusting about NVIDIA? Is this related to Linus' public flogging of the company?

    I interned there a few years ago and their explanation for the driver not being open sourced is true, though it might not please people. The bulk of the driver code is in a platform-agnostic library used by Windows, OSX, and Linux. This code is then adapted to each platform by a small separate team. This means that the Linux driver doesn't lag the Windows driver in support. Unfortunately it also means that to add the dr

  • ... when they obstinately refuse to offer an array of Linux support.
  • "Oh, and nVidia forgot to tell you that shop.nvidia.com has also been compromised. nVidia minimizing the affect that the hack will have on its stock price? SHORT SELL, SHORT SELL."

    I'll hang on to my stock, I have several thousand dollars tied up in it, but don't see why I should be worried. NVIDIA's web store doesn't seem like a major source of revenue.

    "Think for yourself, and question authority." -- http://pastebin.com/G21ytATD [pastebin.com]

    Was there much thought put into the rant? I had difficulty trying to figure out

    • I'll watch their stock carefully over the next few days and buy some if it drops. And the "hacker" who did this? Obviously either very young or very dumb. Fool, if you are going to write your message to the world, learn some grammar. It is "too" not "to", "surprised" not "suprised", and you should have used malicious, not maliciously. You also used commas where periods should be, and you've created numerous run-on sentences. This should pass even second grade. You fail.

Thus spake the master programmer: "After three days without programming, life becomes meaningless." -- Geoffrey James, "The Tao of Programming"

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