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Fortinet VPN Client Exposes VPN Creds; Palo Alto Firewalls Allow Remote Attacks (bleepingcomputer.com) 32

An anonymous reader shares a report: It's been a bad week for two of the world's biggest vendors of enterprise hardware and software -- Fortinet and Palo Alto Networks. The worst of the bunch is a credentials leak affecting Fortinet's FortiClient, an antivirus product provided by Fortinet for both home and enterprise-level clients. Researchers from SEC Consult said in an advisory released this week that they've discovered a security issue that allows attackers to extract credentials for this VPN client. The second major security issue disclosed this week affects firewall products manufactured by Palo Alto Networks and running PAN-OS, the company's in-house operating system. Security researcher Philip Pettersson discovered that by combining three vulnerabilities together, he could run code on a Palo Alto firewall from a remote location with root privileges.
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Fortinet VPN Client Exposes VPN Creds; Palo Alto Firewalls Allow Remote Attacks

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  • by Anonymous Coward

    I worked for FortiNet,
    Their code is crap and they know it.

    They are trying hard to rewrite most of it, but it's years of effort.

    • by TechyImmigrant ( 175943 ) on Thursday December 14, 2017 @03:11PM (#55741083) Homepage Journal

      I worked for FortiNet,
      Their code is crap and they know it.

      They are trying hard to rewrite most of it, but it's years of effort.

      Fortunately it doesn't take years of effort to stop using their products.

      • by ccguy ( 1116865 )

        Fortunately it doesn't take years of effort to stop using their products.

        Of course it does. Some of their clients are definitely not fast making decisions, implementing changes and so on.

    • I was in an interview with Fortinet wireless dept over 2 years ago and something about security, NSA and Snowden came up. I forget the exact words, but one of the interviewers response was very sketchy where it sounded like he was inferring something hush hush. It was really strange and my takeaway was "sounds like backdoor".
    • by haruchai ( 17472 )

      I worked for FortiNet,
      Their code is crap and they know it.

      They are trying hard to rewrite most of it, but it's years of effort.

      Worse than Cisco's? That's quite a feat

  • to charge $80,000 for a ~12 port gigabit Linux-based iptables server and not even modern, some of the older models run Kernel 2.2 and the newer ones 2.4.

    • $80,000? We just dropped $17 million on a device and service contract (for 3 years?)...

    • Modern firewalls are better thought of as a server with dozens of different application proxies and Linux/iptables sat underneath it. They can intercept most protocols and in Palo's case pull files out of the streams and run virus checks or sandbox tests on them, for example SMB connections. That complexity will increase the attack surface, but that can be managed by keeping on top of updates and using layered security so the firewall isn't the only control. The benefits are huge especially in complex organ

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