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US Suspends 'Expedited' H-1B Visas (sfgate.com) 295

"Starting April 3, 2017, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services will temporarily suspend premium processing for all H-1B petitions," read Friday's announcement, which says the suspension "may last up to 6 months." Slashdot reader elrous0 sees it as part of the "ongoing efforts to curb abuses in the controversial H-1B program." The San Francisco Chronicle reports: While it could be difficult to divorce the move Friday from the Trump administration's broader immigration crackdown, some experts believed the agency's decision to be apolitical. "It has everything to do with an understaffed, overworked, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services," said Jason Finkelman, an Austin, Texas, immigration attorney, adding that the wait time for an H-1B visa in California is currently about eight months. However, Vivek Wadhwa, an adjunct professor at Carnegie Mellon University's Silicon Valley campus in NASA Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, said the suspension seems like a message from the government that you "can't buy your way into America."
Whatever the motivation, Engadget believes this will impact large tech companies. "Financial Times quotes a lawyer saying that 'close to 100 percent' of applications from companies like Microsoft utilize the option."
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US Suspends 'Expedited' H-1B Visas

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  • by tietokone-olmi ( 26595 ) on Saturday March 04, 2017 @04:27PM (#53977157)

    Let's see if this changes the division of income in affected companies to better follow market conditions.

    I wouldn't expect too much of a republican administration, in that regard. (nor the other party. let's not make this a pissing match.)

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by AmiMoJo ( 196126 )

      They will probably just move the jobs overseas.

      • by tietokone-olmi ( 26595 ) on Saturday March 04, 2017 @04:44PM (#53977219)

        We're talking about H1B's here. Imported labour. If their jobs could be offshored, they already would've been: the offshoring job-market favours capital even more than that for indentured brown people.

        Some leftie you are, failing even at basic Marxist economics.

        • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

          by AmiMoJo ( 196126 )

          There is value is having people at the main campus in the US. If there is no way they can do that, it becomes feasible to move the campus instead. It at least part of it.

          • by gfxguy ( 98788 ) on Saturday March 04, 2017 @05:35PM (#53977359)

            I work for a rather large (and here nameless) entertainment company. They tried off-shoring our technical support to Romania. Our various sub-companies make a very good profit, year after year - as much of the entertainment industry, we generally weather bad economies better than most because people fall back to less expensive forms of entertainment like TV and movies rather than concerts or vacations. Why did the bean counters feel like it wasn't enough? I don't know.... but looking at numbers on paper is far different than what happens in reality.

            Yes, our tech support was expensive - but responsive, fast, taking care of issues correctly the first time and right away, largely because someone could actually come to our desk and fix things. The Romania deal was a disaster. It's not that Romanians are stupid - far from it; it's that it's a lot more difficult to troubleshoot an issue from 5000 miles away than it is when you're sitting in front of the computer having problems. Then this bean counter probably got accolades and a big bonus, all the while actually COSTING the company more money in lost productivity. We have since switched back. Unfortunately, the company has already taken a number of other cost cutting measures that look good on paper, but have already started to backfire. They will not learn, they are only interested in the short term gain. Companies need more forward thinking leaders, but when CEO's get golden parachutes while driving companies into bankruptcy, it doesn't happen.

            So... long story short, it is indeed valuable actually having people here. And no H1B visas needed - none of the fired tech support people were H1B, and they didn't need to be.

            • by Imrik ( 148191 ) on Saturday March 04, 2017 @06:18PM (#53977507) Homepage

              Short term gains increase stock value, investors sell, no one involved cares what happens after that.

              • Institutional investors and lower level employees are left holding the bag, so pensioners and working stiffs care what happens after that ... so basically no one important.

            • Companies need more forward thinking leaders, but when CEO's get golden parachutes while driving companies into bankruptcy, it doesn't happen.

              It's called 'corporate looting' or 'bankrupty for profit'. The (nobel laureate - or at least it equivalent in economics) husband of the current Federal Reserve (US central bank) chief co-authored a paper about it.(PDF) [nyu.edu]

            • I was a tam at a company really large software company (you've used their products - even if you only use OSX or Linux) - they offshored all the support work, and then justified it by forging the customer satisfaction surveys. They'd only send survey's to customers on calls they'd knock out of the park. So the front lines/tier 1 would get something like 4000+ phone calls a day, and we were getting like a hundred surveys a month.

              Anyhow the guy who's brilliant idea this was - still works there and gets accola

    • by Anonymous Coward

      I wrote days ago we will be thanking trump as he does more and more to give citizens thier jobs back. We are just getting started people. Soon citizens will be able to work these well paid jobs again.

      Sure you don't care since you are employed. But many others are beaten out because of simply lower immigrant worker wages. That's it.

      Do you really think these are geniuses coming over???? No. And do you really think mostvtech jobs require geniuses???? Absolutely no no way.

      I am loving this. It us still not a le

  • Thank you Trump! (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 04, 2017 @04:36PM (#53977191)

    He's on a great start to be our best President ever.

  • by s.petry ( 762400 ) on Saturday March 04, 2017 @04:39PM (#53977203)

    This is good news for the US economy as a whole, at least on the surface. Lets avoid the arguments about being paid less or being treated as indentured servants for now. A good portion of the H1B worker's money goes back to their home country. Even if they made the same wages, they don't spend the money the same so American's lose money in the economy and jobs at the lower end.

    The answer from many of these big companies will to simply lay off more Americans and move more jobs overseas. Those regulations need to see some light for this to truly work out.

    • by barc0001 ( 173002 ) on Saturday March 04, 2017 @04:52PM (#53977253)

      Most of the jobs that can be easily offshored have already been done by these companies. There's a reason they want the H1Bs instead and that's because they understand the limitations of offshoring and the communication and control gaps. Offshoring looks good on paper but in practice for non-trivial tasks there's a friction to the process that shows up after actually doing it. Of the various companies I've worked at that have done offshoring they all ended up moving some or all of the jobs back because the quality of the work was inferior, getting the problems corrected took time due to the time zone lag and there was also a lack of control due to that same time zone lag. In the end most of the projects ended up costing almost as much and took 3-4x longer to do which ended up with large opportunity costs for the companies.

      • by jandersen ( 462034 ) on Sunday March 05, 2017 @04:34AM (#53979047)

        There's a reason they want the H1Bs instead and that's because they understand the limitations of offshoring and the communication and control gaps

        In part, but another side of this is that they want to drive down wages, not just for the imported workers, but for the locals as well. The more sensible way to handle this would be to require companies to pay a minimum wage, and not a universal minimum wage, but one that follows the job description or something like that. Something like that is already in place in many countries - in UK, overseas companies can get visas to transfer staff from their overseas departments, but their pay in UK must be of the right size for the job title.That way the companies can get their genuine needs for expertise met, while not being able to undercut wages for local staff.

        • The more sensible way to handle this would be to require companies to pay a minimum wage, and not a universal minimum wage, but one that follows the job description or something like that.

          But they're ALREADY bringing them in on one job description then assigning them to do other work. There are a couple of reasons for doing this, but one of them is to avoid the appearance of replacing the workers on the REAL job with lower-priced imported labor, without leaving a paper trail showing that's what happened.

          On

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Well said. Also, a lot of these jobs SHOULDN'T require 4-year degrees (which are now ridiculously expensive). Companies should pool together and fund 6-month code academies to fill these positions rather than trying to get cheap labor from outside the US.

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Solandri ( 704621 )

      A good portion of the H1B worker's money goes back to their home country.

      That's a temporary effect. The whole point of the H1-B program, at least from the employee's and government's point of view, is to grant citizenship to a skilled and productive foreigner. Once the worker gets U.S. citizenship, their next step will immediately to be apply for citizenship for their immediate family and have them immigrate to the U.S. At which point they stop sending money back to their home country, and start spendi

      • by erktrek ( 473476 )

        So when citizenship is granted then the company can move on to a more profitable employee from overseas and then we have 2 issues - more un/under-employed citizens AND more outsourcing. yayy...

        I'm kidding hopefully - hard to tell these days.

      • At which point they stop sending money back to their home country, and start spending it here in the U.S.

        Well...not exactly. I mean why should they stop sending money home just because they have some new piece of paper that says they are American citizens? Although it depends on the culture to some extent and how poor their families back home are, probably they will still send money home. I suppose you could try to stop them from doing that by making such money transfers illegal, but immigrants from poor countries are usually going to send at least some money home to their poor relatives if they can. That's ju

    • This is good news for the US economy as a whole, at least on the surface.....

      No it's not. You can claim it may be good news for US tech workers, that's unlikely to have any real effect, but for the economy this is undoubtedly bad.

      Studies have showed that while the H1B program:
      1) have been beneficial to the US economy as a whole (because cost of software development, and lack of developers strangles growth).
      2) have possibly lowered wages for well paid tech jobs (this is not conclusive, but there are hints in this direction),

      That said, there probably has been some abuse, th

      • 1) have been beneficial to the US economy as a whole (because cost of software development, and lack of developers strangles growth).

        I think the economists are probably right when they say trade, immigration, etc. benefit the economy as a whole.

        The problem is that it's kind of a hollow argument because rising income inequality means that the growth in the economy as a whole isn't getting distributed to rank and file workers. Usually cost reductions and efficiency improvements end up as corporate profit which gets unequally distributed to senior executives and/or shareholders, not wage earners.

        It's great that we're baking a bigger pie ev

        • When they are talking about the economy 'as a whole' they may be referring to the world economy and indeed free trade is good for that. However if what you are worried about is your own piece of the pie as a highly privileged elite who benefits greatly from artificial borders and the resulting income inequality then that is not necessarily a good thing for you personally.

          Maybe someone who will be happy to work for $1/hour can do your job as well as you can. Would that be good for the world economy? How coul

          • by swb ( 14022 )

            However if what you are worried about is your own piece of the pie as a highly privileged elite who benefits greatly from artificial borders and the resulting income inequality then that is not necessarily a good thing for you personally.

            Yes, as a fact I am worried about my piece of the pie and I don't want it taken away. The global morality is immaterial to me, I am unwilling to sacrifice 90% of my standard of living to raise that of others by 2%.

            Nevertheless I'd be interested to see what would really happen in a world entirely without borders where everyone was allowed to physically live and work anywhere they wanted. It would be an interesting experiment. I'm not sure such a world would really be that different though because most poor people don't have the money for airline tickets or other international moving expenses and don't have good enough educations to really compete with people educated in first world countries. Although presumably some of the HR drones may not be able to distinguish between well educated and badly educated applicants. And it's not like the whole world would suddenly get better at speaking English.

            I think it looks lot like Western Europe's influx of migrants, actually, and that's an example where you actually have borders, where poor people can't afford airline tickets and don't have the language or job skills to compete for any but the most menial of jobs.

            As a thought experiment, if you ac

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 04, 2017 @04:47PM (#53977231)

    Hopefully, the Trump administration will build upon this first step by properly increasing the minimum wages of an H1B worker to something more commensurate with that of a world class expert in science, technology, engineering or math. The wage should reflect the fact that the necessary worker is so rare and valuable that no US citizen living anywhere in the United States can satisfy the requirements. In my opinion, a person of such outstanding capability cannot be worth less than $250,000 per year in salary to the employer. If Google or Facebook or Apple need these people so desperately, it should be no problem for such wealthy corporations to pay what amounts to a pittance for skills and expertise which cannot, or so they claim, be found in any American citizens.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      There needs to be different minimum for varying fields. For STEM jobs $250,000 sounds about right but should a prized literary professor be making $250,000? If this distinctions aren't made, H1B should be renamed as STEM only visa.

      • by guruevi ( 827432 )

        There are other types of visas for academia, actors etc - true talent which Microsoft and Google is always yammering on about does not come in on H1B. Bringing in a 'prized professor' on H1B is not something you do, H1B in academia is for assistant professors, research assistants etc for $20k/y.

    • by Pulzar ( 81031 )

      The wage should reflect the fact that the necessary worker is so rare and valuable that no US citizen living anywhere in the United States can satisfy the requirements.

      That's not at all what it means. Obviously, some US citizen can satisfy the requirements, just not any that are willing to quit their jobs and/or move to wherever this position is, or are just not that interested in that particular position.

      That's really not that rare. Otherwise there wouldn't be so many open positions out there sitting open

  • by El Cubano ( 631386 ) on Saturday March 04, 2017 @04:49PM (#53977241)

    While it could be difficult to divorce the move Friday from the Trump administration's broader immigration crackdown

    It is actually not difficult at all. The default position since Trump got elected has been to blame him. This despite the fact that it makes people who are otherwise legitimate, respectable public figures seem like raving lunatics. They seem like lunatics because this is their mindless reaction to anything they think they can associate with Trump, including things (like the Yemen raid) which were planned and prepared during the Obama administration.

    For example. I just saw an article how SXSW is now facing a public backlash over an immigration-related clause in this contracts for performers. People are just skewering them, calling for boycotts, etc. They are lamenting how SXSW is part of the immigration problem and awful their support for Trump's immigration policies is. The clause has been there for four years.

    Here is some more from the Wikipedia article on Deportation and removal from the United States [wikipedia.org]:

    In the 105 years between 1892 and 1997, the United States deported 2.1 million people.[2]

    Between 1997 and 2001, during the Presidency of Bill Clinton, about 870,000 people were deported from the United States.[3]

    Between 2001 and 2008, during the Presidency of George W. Bush, about 2 million people were deported from the United States.

    Between 2009 and 2016, during the Presidency of Barack Obama, about 3.2 million people were deported from the United States.[4]

    As you read that, remember that during one of his State of the Union Addresses Clinton specifically called for greater enforcement of immigration laws, and got a bipartisan standing ovation at that comment.

    Also, just a couple of years ago immigrant rights groups were calling Obama "deporter-in-chief". I wonder why that was. I seem to recall Bush being branded a racist immigrant hater and immigrants came out in droves to vote for Obama. Twice. The single biggest deception in modern politics was Obama pulling a fast one on the entire immigrant population of the US. Twice.

    Absolutely none of that matters now. Since Trump got elected, we can just project everything on to him, even if it makes the people doing so look like raving lunatics.

    Seriously, he has been in office a whopping 6 weeks. Keep this up and in a few months nobody will be listening (c.f., The Boy Who Cried Wolf [wikipedia.org]). Think about that: nobody will be listening.

    • For example. I just saw an article how SXSW is now facing a public backlash over an immigration-related clause in this contracts for performers. People are just skewering them, calling for boycotts, etc. They are lamenting how SXSW is part of the immigration problem and awful their support for Trump's immigration policies is. The clause has been there for four years.

      They're wrong to blame Trump for that clause, but they're not wrong to be more worried about it than usual at a time when Trump is directing the INS to run around and lie to police departments if necessary to get compliance for their raiding parties.

      • by ghoul ( 157158 )

        Till Raegan gave an amnesty people coming illegally felt they were coming temporarily, would earn and go back. With Raegan's amnesty illegal immigration became an actual viable path to citizenship and illegal immigration exploded. At the same time NAFTA meant that Mexico's corn industry got killed by cheap subsidized corn from the midwest. No wonder illegal immigration from Mexico has gone up and the corresponding deportation numbers.

        If Trump tears up NAFTA Mexican farm workers will have jobs in Mex

        • Your post is based on an assumption that is untrue.

          Net illegal immigration is essentially zero. Lots of Mexicans have been going back and, guess what, Obama extradited a lot also.

    • by Kergan ( 780543 )

      Didn't they change the definition of deportations during the Obama administration, so as to count random aliens that were caught crossing the border in addition to the usual ones that were detained before being sent back?

      Not saying one way or another - or that doing so - is right or wrong, or that one had more merit than the other. Just pointing out that comparing Bush stats and Obama stats is apples to oranges. (Apples to apples has Bush Jr throwing out a tiny bit more aliens if memory serves.) $.02.

    • by quonset ( 4839537 ) on Saturday March 04, 2017 @05:25PM (#53977337)

      The default position since Trump got elected has been to blame him.

      And the default position since Trump got elected has to been to hail him for the rise of the stock market, rising corporate profits, and better than expected GDP. So which is it? If he's going to get the kudos even though he's only been in office a few weeks he should also get the blame, right?

      things (like the Yemen raid) which were planned and prepared during the Obama administration.

      Planning is one thing, executing is another and it was Trump who gave the go ahead for the raid despite not going through the normal procedure to get an overview of what was to take place. From all reports Trump pulled this out of the hat and said, "Do it" without any thought or consideration. Even after they knew the raid had been compromised he went ahead with it. You can't blame Obama for this one. Trump said do it. He's the president and as the saying goes, "The buck stops here."

      Since Trump got elected, we can just project everything on to him, even if it makes the people doing so look like raving lunatics.

      The only one looking like a raving lunatic is Trump with his, "Fake news!" every time his words and deeds are reported, his ramblings about vote fraud despite him claiming in lawsuits to stop vote recounts there was no evidence of vote fraud so there was no need for a recount, his, "The press is the enemy of the American people" comments and of course his latest tirade-without-evidence, Obama wiretapped him during the campaign.

      If Hillary had said any of the above you would be on here pointing out she was a lunatic, yet because Trump said it we're supposed to give him a pass?

      • by SuperKendall ( 25149 ) on Saturday March 04, 2017 @05:30PM (#53977347)

        has to been to hail him for the rise of the stock market

        Come on. The rise started literally the day after Trump was elected. Surely even you can admit Trump is responsible - not because of what Trump has done mind you, but what he is predicted to do.

        Regardless, Trump is responsible.

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          Clearly the rising wages, the accelerating GDP and business optimism in 2017 will be the result of the Donald.

          I know this just as much as I know that in 2018 the budget shortfalls, the eco disasters, the alienated allies and the failing economy will be the fault of Obama

      • Thanks.

        Mod +1, Insightful

      • by geek ( 5680 )

        The default position since Trump got elected has been to blame him.

        And the default position since Trump got elected has to been to hail him for the rise of the stock market, rising corporate profits, and better than expected GDP.

        Stock markets are bets on the future, not reflections on the past. Educate yourself and stop whining like a baby.

    • by eriks ( 31863 )

      Since Trump got elected, we can just project everything on to him, even if it makes the people doing so look like raving lunatics.

      Seriously, he has been in office a whopping 6 weeks. Keep this up and in a few months nobody will be listening ...

      *Thanks* Obama!

    • This despite the fact that it makes people who are otherwise legitimate, respectable public figures seem like raving lunatics. They seem like lunatics because this is their mindless reaction to anything they think they can associate with Trump, including things (like the Yemen raid) which were planned and prepared during the Obama administration.

      It's more complicated than that:

      1) The President gets final approval on the execution, he's supposed to be the one asking hard questions and making sure the operation is a good idea, not just in planning but when it's time to execute. By all accounts Trump didn't do this, his position was apparently to greenlight whatever the military wanted to do.

      2) The President can be held accountable by voters in a way that generals cannot, that's why civilian oversight of the military is so important, so the public can

  • Vivek Wadhwa (Score:5, Informative)

    by dcw3 ( 649211 ) on Saturday March 04, 2017 @05:07PM (#53977293) Journal

    Mr. Wadhaw apparently doesn't understand that premium processing does not buy you a visa, or increase your chances of getting one.

    http://www.nolo.com/legal-ency... [nolo.com]

  • Not the first time (Score:5, Informative)

    by phantomfive ( 622387 ) on Saturday March 04, 2017 @05:18PM (#53977321) Journal
    They also delayed processing in 2015 [wikipedia.org], with the same reason given: so they could catch up on their backlog.

    My dream is that Slashdot become a place where people do a little research before commenting irrationally.
    • Slashdotters stop commenting irrationally? That's crazy talk. Next you'll want people to do things like RTFA. :)
      • Next you'll want people to do things like RTFA. :)

        Nah, prefer they research a bit independently, because often the article sucks :)

      • by Imrik ( 148191 )

        Don't be silly, he said that he wanted people to do research before commenting irrationally. Didn't say anything about not commenting irrationally.

  • To curb abuses... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by 140Mandak262Jamuna ( 970587 ) on Saturday March 04, 2017 @05:24PM (#53977333) Journal
    USA should stop treating degrees from diploma mills in India as equivalent to degrees from accredited us universities. They can start a program to let foreign universities to undergo the same accreditation process. It pains me they treat IIT ivy league Caltech and colleges owned by Indian politicians selling degrees for cash as all the same. I am an IIT grad. I am nursing two h1b applications. One Indian from Caltech and a Chinese woman from ut Austin. It is a crime their applications go through the same lottery with crescent diploma mill, India.
  • by Notabadguy ( 961343 ) on Saturday March 04, 2017 @06:37PM (#53977581)

    Is to read "U.S. to Temporarily Suspend H-1B Visa Program" followed by a snippet on investigation into rampant misuse and an intensive investigation.

  • These stupid companies using the H1B, to hire people to come here and work for LESS than American workers is crap! Between that and offshoring crap.
  • by Virtucon ( 127420 ) on Saturday March 04, 2017 @07:09PM (#53977727)

    But when the majority of H1-Bs [sfchronicle.com] requests in 2015 coming from Infosys, Tata, Wipro, Accenture, IBM & Deloitte I fail to see how any company like Google and Microsoft are benefiting from H1-Bs which still seems strange since they're leadership is the one lobbying loudest in congress for them. Especially since they've all been yelling for Coding Schools and STEM education at the same time.

    Import the cheapest labor possible, it's 80%+ from India, and they're disposable. The American Dream.

  • by takochan ( 470955 ) <takochan42@@@yahoo...com> on Saturday March 04, 2017 @10:57PM (#53978489)

    Though I did not vote for Trump, I have to say he is certainly right about all the fake news (on this topic at least)..

    The "spin" regarding H1B in news articles spewing out since this was announced this morning is amazing...

    Everyone (on this site at least), knows that H1B is all about getting rid of Americans in IT jobs in the USA to replace them with cheaper Indians onshore for roles that companies were not able to offshore to India for whatever reason..

    On major sites as of this morning..:

    On Google News / CNN:
    http://money.cnn.com/2017/03/0... [cnn.com]
    "Large firms say they need the visas to bring in engineers and other high-skilled workers they can't find in the U.S. " ...the article has the above, plus a whole bunch of unrelated sob stories about people who cannot find doctors (an H1B edge case).

    again, the fake "skills shortage"..while in reality our IT grads are working in $30K annual salary jobs, Best-Buy and Starbucks because they cannot find good IT work. I know plenty of smart folks in situations like this..

    On Reuters:
    http://www.reuters.com/article... [reuters.com]
    "The H-1B non-immigrant visa allows U.S. companies to employ graduate-level workers in several specialized fields, including information technology, medicine, engineering and mathematics." ..slightly better, but the article again fails to mention the actual issue anywhere in the piece..that virtually all the of the H1B visas issued are used by outsourcing or IT companies to replace Americans in IT roles in the USA with cheaper onshore Indians flown in from India.

    I have to hand it to him, Trump may be rather nuts overall, but he is actually doing what he said he would do, and he is the first person in office to actually address this issue (or even mention it).., which is more than you can say for either the R's or D's that have been president up to now. (I don't really consider Trump to be an 'R', either, for what its worth..he is following his own agenda mostly unrelated to the R party from what I can see..)

    Kudos to him, maybe I was wrong about him after all..

    • I have to hand it to him, Trump may be rather nuts overall, but he is actually doing what he said he would do, and he is the first person in office to actually address this issue (or even mention it).., which is more than you can say for either the R's or D's that have been president up to now. (I don't really consider Trump to be an 'R', either, for what its worth..he is following his own agenda mostly unrelated to the R party from what I can see.

      I also voted against Trump. I also got my wife to come vote for her first time, against Trump. Mostly because a) he said obnoxious things and b) had no political experience. Though on point (a) I know he's made a career of saying things to get media attention - like Hpward Stern, he says stuff to get press converage, and largely believes "there's no such thing as bad publicity". Compare most politicians including Hillary who say whatever they think will get *good* press. Anyway, the dude is obnoxious, th

      • Unfortunately, perhaps, the primary votes from people who wanted a Republican were split between several similar candidates, while Trump very successfully positioned himself as different, as the alternative to "all those guys" (and he *is* different).

        IMHO the media thought that Trump would be the easiest for Hillary to defeat and did their best to sabotage the campaigns of the regular - and irregular - politicians in the Republican primary.

        They did this mainly by focusing on Trump and giving little coverag

  • These programs will be studied by historians as the modern-day workaround around prohibition of slavery and indentured servitude. The only thing which will be remembered will be the living conditions suffered by many of these visa holders and their delayed rights to participate in political process despite being bona fide immigrants. No one will remember or care about their salary levels. It takes 3x as much money in SF to buy the same life style as one could buy in, let's say, Omaha. The 10-15% differe
  • by ShoulderOfOrion ( 646118 ) on Sunday March 05, 2017 @01:22AM (#53978795)

    Replace it with a salary auction for the limited number of H-1Bs available. A company would 'buy' H-1Bs by bidding a minimum yearly salary for each visa, which it would then be required to pay the visa holder for the duration of the visa. The company with the highest bid wins the visa. Cap the number of visas available such that the minimum winning bids average 10% more than the salary paid to an American worker for the same job. That would allow Google and Microsoft to buy as many of the offshore geniuses as they want (or can afford), while putting a fork in the IT outsourcing firms who game the current lottery system.

"And remember: Evil will always prevail, because Good is dumb." -- Spaceballs

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