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51% of Computer Users Share Passwords 117

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the rm-rf-/-of-shame dept.
An anonymous reader writes Consumers are inadvertently leaving back doors open to attackers as they share login details and sign up for automatic log on to mobile apps and services, according to new research by Intercede. While 52% of respondents stated that security was a top priority when choosing a mobile device, 51% are putting their personal data at risk by sharing usernames and passwords with friends, family and colleagues. The research revealed that consumers are not only sharing passwords but also potentially putting their personal and sensitive information at risk by leaving themselves logged in to applications on their mobile devices, with over half of those using social media applications and email admitting that they leave themselves logged in on their mobile device.
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51% of Computer Users Share Passwords

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  • Logged in to email? (Score:5, Informative)

    by NoImNotNineVolt (832851) on Wednesday August 20, 2014 @10:57AM (#47712351) Homepage

    The research revealed that consumers are not only sharing passwords but also potentially putting their personal and sensitive information at risk by leaving themselves logged in to applications on their mobile devices, with over half of those using social media applications and email admitting that they leave themselves logged in on their mobile device.

    Yes, god forbid people "leave themselves logged in" to their email accounts on their mobile device. I guess we're not supposed to use push email but instead enter our email passwords into our phones every few seconds to get timely email alerts?

    It's too bad that the cell network itself lacks any meaningful security mechanisms. I mean, if someone gets a hold of your phone, they can just start texting and calling without having to "log in" on the network at all. It's amazing that the world hasn't collapsed as a result.

  • Re:I do not (Score:4, Informative)

    by alphatel (1450715) * on Wednesday August 20, 2014 @11:05AM (#47712409)

    49percent

    That's my password...

  • by cr_nucleus (518205) on Wednesday August 20, 2014 @11:25AM (#47712561)

    Don't know what version you're running but android does support multiple accounts since 4.2 [androidpolice.com].
    I've being enjoying it for a while now.

    AFAIK it's the only mobile OS doing so.

  • by jandrese (485) <kensama@vt.edu> on Wednesday August 20, 2014 @12:00PM (#47712783) Homepage Journal
    It is actually required by law to be there. All phones must be capable of making an emergency call without being unlocked.
  • by tlhIngan (30335) <slashdotNO@SPAMworf.net> on Wednesday August 20, 2014 @03:43PM (#47714771)

    Ah. I could have sworn that when I set up proper locking mechanisms on the phone that there wasn't any option to call. I just tried it again, though, and there is an "Emergency Call" text. For a test, I tried using my cell phone to call my work number and it said that this number wasn't an emergency number. My next question would be how would I specify certain emergency numbers? (This way, if my child has my phone and needs to call a relative that they know the number of, they can without having to know my unlock code and thus having full access to the phone.)

    You can't.

    The emergency call is for calling emergency numbers. It's a small list - 911, 999, 111, 122, etc. In fact, I think on modern cellphones, you can call ANY emergency number and it'll connect you to emergency services. So in North America, if you dial 999 (Europe emergency) you will connect with 911 automatically - the phone interprets the number as emergency and basically does a emergency dial (it's a special control code so the tower will kick someone off if it needs to in order to connect you).

    It's not a huge list of numbers, and it's coded into the software as it has to recognize if you're calling emergency services and to place it as a high-priority call on the network.

    And no, it doesn't include your relatives number - that's not the intent. The intent is to be able to make a call to emergency services regardless of lock screen status, service status, etc. (It's how those used cellphone charities work - they collect deactivated cellphones for people so they have a way to get to emergency services).

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