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Neiman Marcus and Other Retailers Breached, Credit Card Details Stolen 151

Posted by Soulskill
from the not-their-problem-until-it's-their-problem dept.
Fnord666 writes "Another day, another data breach. Apparently high end retailer Neiman Marcus has also suffered a breach of credit card data. Brian Krebs has the report: 'Responding to inquiries about a possible data breach involving customer credit and debit card information, upscale retailer Neiman Marcus acknowledged today that it is working with the U.S. Secret Service to investigate a hacker break-in that has exposed an unknown number of customer cards. Earlier this week, I began hearing from sources in the financial industry about an increasing number of fraudulent credit and debit card charges that were being traced to cards that had been very recently used at brick-and-mortar stores run by the Dallas, Texas based high-end retail chain. Sources said that while it appears the fraud on those stolen cards was perpetrated at a variety of other stores, the common point of purchase among the compromised cards was Neiman Marcus. Today, I reached out to Neiman Marcus and received confirmation that the company is in fact investigating a breach that was uncovered in mid-December.'" The Chicago Tribune reports that "at least three other well-known U.S. retailers" suffered breaches this holiday season as well.
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Neiman Marcus and Other Retailers Breached, Credit Card Details Stolen

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  • by Frosty Piss (770223) * on Sunday January 12, 2014 @02:46AM (#45930757)

    Yay Credit Cards! We don't have to worry about getting screwed over because they protect us while they screw us! So we're used to it!

    I've never had a problem with mine. Ever. I pay it off every month (thus I pay no interest), and I know that if an on-line retailer screws me over, I can dispute the charge, and the credit card company will back me.

    So, I don't see a problem.

    If you can't manage your finances responsibly, maybe you shouldn't have one?

  • by Frosty Piss (770223) * on Sunday January 12, 2014 @02:49AM (#45930771)

    My dad runs a small business, and usually if there is any problem with a credit card charge, Visa/MC will extract money back from him in a blink of an eye.

    What kind of "problem" would that be? If your father is not providing adequate customer service such that customers seek redress from their credit card company, maybe the problem isn't the credit card?

  • by AK Marc (707885) on Sunday January 12, 2014 @03:09AM (#45930819)
    The "fix" is to hold the breaches responsible for every fraudulent charge and re-issued card. The stores store the numbers, often in violation of their agreements, and nobody cares. They should get sued for their negligence. When that happens some, nobody will want to store the card numbers (like they are supposed to), and breaches will net nothing more than customer names and addresses, at most.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday January 12, 2014 @10:37AM (#45932033)

    My dad runs a small business, and usually if there is any problem with a credit card charge, Visa/MC will extract money back from him in a blink of an eye.

    By brother ran a small business, a fast food restaurant. These kinds of complaints arise more often than you think.

    Once a customer ate his meal, complained, asked for a refund (which was met with an offer of more food, but not a return of the charge), and called his credit card company to have the transaction reversed. It was. As a small retailer, there's precious little recourse. The card company will typically take any customer complaint over the shop owner's defense.

    What kind of "problem" would that be? If your father is not providing adequate customer service such that customers seek redress from their credit card company, maybe the problem isn't the credit card?

    What kind of a statement is that? Basically you know little to nothing about the situation, yet you assume the worst to validate the current status quo.

    For the privledge of having any payment reversed at a moment's notice, you pay per month a lump sum, an installation fee, buy the equipment, take a percentage cut out of every sale, and abide by their rules which include the right to reverse. Yes, it's all agreed to, but it's the kind of agreement that must be made if you want to be able to do business with 70% of the population. That's why it's not seen as an easy-come, easy-go proposition.

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