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Storing Your Encrypted Passwords Offline On a Dedicated Device 107

Posted by samzenpus
from the built-to-last dept.
An anonymous reader writes "The Hackaday writer Mathieu Stephan (alias limpkin) has just launched a new open source/hardware project together with the Hackaday community. The concept behind this product is to minimize the number of ways your passwords can be compromised, while generating long and complex random passwords for the different websites people use daily. It consists of a main device where users' credentials are encrypted, and a PIN locked smartcard containing the encryption key. Simply visit a website and the device will ask for confirmation to enter your credentials when you need to login. All development steps will be documented and all resources available for review."
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Storing Your Encrypted Passwords Offline On a Dedicated Device

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  • by pezpunk (205653) on Sunday December 08, 2013 @08:16PM (#45635313) Homepage

    Douglas Adams, right again.

    "It was an Ident-i-Eeze, and was a very naughty and silly thing for Harl to have lying around in his wallet, though it was perfectly understandable. There were so many different ways in which you were required to provide absolute proof of your identity these days that life could easily become extremely tiresome just from that factor alone, never mind the deeper existential problems of trying to function as a coherent consciousness in an epistemologically ambiguous physical universe. Just look at cash point machines, for instance. Queues of people standing around waiting to have their fingerprints read, their retinas scanned, bits of skin scraped from the nape of the neck and undergoing instant (or nearly instant --- a good six or seven seconds in tedious reality) genetic analysis, then having to answer trick questions about members of their family they didn't even remember they had, and about their recorded preferences for tablecloth colours. And that was just to get a bit of spare cash for the weekend. If you were trying to raise a loan for a jetcar, sign a missile treaty or pay an entire restaurant bill things could get really trying.

    Hence the Ident-i-Eeze. This encoded every single piece of information about you, your body and your life into one all- purpose machine-readable card that you could then carry around in your wallet, and therefore represented technology's greatest triumph to date over both itself and plain common sense. "
    -Mostly Harmless, 1992

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