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Alleged ZeuS Botmaster Arrested For Stealing $100M From US Banks 76

Posted by timothy
from the stumbling-block-on-the-career-path dept.
Trailrunner7 writes "A 24-year-old Algerian man remains in a Thai jail awaiting extradition to the United States, where he is suspected of masterminding more than $100 million in global bank heists using the ZeuS and SpyEye Trojans. Malaysian authorities believe they've apprehended the hacker Hamza Bendelladj, who they say has been jetsetting around the world using millions of dollars stolen online from various banks. He was arrested at a Bangkok airport en route from Malaysia to Egypt. The hacker had developed a considerable reputation as a major operator of ZeuS-powered botnets and bragged about his exploits"
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Alleged ZeuS Botmaster Arrested For Stealing $100M From US Banks

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  • moral of the story (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday January 12, 2013 @08:00AM (#42566447)

    Don't spend money like an brain-dead Arkansas lotto winner if you steal millions of dollars from US victims using malware.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday January 12, 2013 @08:17AM (#42566517)

      Don't spend money like an brain-dead Arkansas lotto winner if you steal millions of dollars from US victims using malware.

      What else can he do with it besides spend it? He can't put it in the bank because banks aren't safe any more.

    • Re: (Score:1, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      What? Isn't that Obama, Bernanke, Geithner, and the rest of the Legislative branch of the US government? The thing is, only the little guy gets arrested and punished for theft, but if you're a big hedge fund or banker John Corzine type, you get away with murder.

      • What? Isn't that Obama, Bernanke, Geithner, and the rest of the Legislative branch of the US government? The thing is, only the little guy gets arrested and punished for theft, but if you're a big hedge fund or banker John Corzine type, you get away with murder.

        I wouldn't call someone "suspected of masterminding more than $100 million in global bank heists" a "little guy".

        BTW, none of those guys you mentioned are accused of running botnets, and none of them work in the Legislative branch, so why are you even bringing them up?

        • by evil_aaronm (671521) on Saturday January 12, 2013 @09:10AM (#42566679)
          I think AC was pointing to the fact that, rather than hold the people who caused the financial meltdown and subsequent bailout responsible, the authorities let them walk with their ill-gotten profits from their financial shenanigans. Isn't it up to the authorities to a) prevent these things; and / or b) prosecute them? We prosecute a botnet master who brags about his exploits, but we let walk those white collar criminals that took even more.
  • better idea.. (Score:5, Interesting)

    by fliptout (9217) on Saturday January 12, 2013 @08:16AM (#42566511) Homepage

    Why not leave him in Thai jail.

    • by gl4ss (559668)

      Why not leave him in Thai jail.

      because the thai's have nothing on him?

    • by lonecrow (931585)
      Recruiting for cyber-warfare
  • If he would have owned a bank and not 0wned them, he could have gotten away with a lot more then just 100.000.000.
    I wonder how accurate that figure is. Is it just an attempt or is it the actual figure he would have been able to spend if he would not have been caught?

    I suspect he did not get that money and the number is just everything added that can be pointed to theft, including pens and staplers and the electricity bill used to run the servers.

    If it was actually 100M he could have been able to spend, the

  • by gweihir (88907) on Saturday January 12, 2013 @08:55AM (#42566627)

    These people may have some superior specialized skills, but personality-wise, they are retarded. The same can incidentally be found in a lot of CEOs and high-placed government officials. Seems we promote the scum to the top, and those that cannot get promoted turn to crime instead in order to implement their delusions of grandeur.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Lower density substances rise above higher density substances. That's why we get the airheads at the top, and the smarties at the bottom.

    • by whoever57 (658626)
      There are studies that show that personality disorders are more common in senior executives than the criminally insane: [bhevolution.org]

      For our purposes, the most interesting results of the study came from the comparison of the senior business executives to the offenders at Broadmoor. The study showed that three out of the eleven personality disorders were more common in the senior business managers than in the criminal psychiatric patients

    • by Sarten-X (1102295)

      Of course. That's why the middle-of-the-road average folks never brag about their fantasy football team, or how their kid did well in the science fair, or how perfectly that prank went off last week... And that failed project wasn't because of the "sick" day when the report was due, but definitely because of the manager's incompetence. Sure.

      Everybody takes credit for their achievements, and blames others for their problems. Why should CEOs or criminals be any different?

  • by dav1dc (2662425) on Saturday January 12, 2013 @09:12AM (#42566691) Homepage

    "The hacker had developed a considerable reputation as a major operator of ZeuS-powered botnets and bragged about his exploits"

    Seems if he had just enjoyed the 100M and kept his mouth shut they might not have figured out who he is...

    • by timeOday (582209)
      Ego boost is the only real reason to amass a great fortune, so having it and keeping it secret is little better than not having it at all.
  • In related news (Score:2, Interesting)

    by dkleinsc (563838)

    US banks caught stealing billions from unsuspecting depositors, borrowers, investors, municipal governments, and the US treasury, had investigations of their activity closed out with nobody indicted or arrested.

  • If I had 100 million dollars?

    You would not find me.

  • by nickserv (1974794) on Saturday January 12, 2013 @09:50AM (#42566843)

    This story should have run nearly a week ago, he was arrested last Sunday GMT +7.

    Here's a story about it from the Bangkok Post that ran on the 7th GMT +7 http://www.bangkokpost.com/news/crimes/329622/police-nab-suspect-wanted-for-hacking [bangkokpost.com]

    Here's another from local media in Thailand. http://www.nationmultimedia.com/national/Hacker-held-pending-extradition-30197522.html [nationmultimedia.com]

    "The lawsuit states the suspect used the "spy eye" software to steal people's financial information through phony Web pages from 217 computer networks worldwide from December 2009 to September 2011. An arrest warrant was issued in the state of Georgia on December 21, 2011. US authorities later called on Thai police to nab him and also requested that he be detained pending extradition."

    In the last couple years it seems that Thailand is trying to displace Canada as America's #1 bitch.

    As you can see from the photos he's been all smiles from his arrest at the airport to the obligatory publicity photo op Thai police hold when they occasionally do their job and arrest someone.

  • How is using a bot to farm millions any different than what financial companies do?

    • by ScentCone (795499)

      How is using a bot to farm millions any different than what financial companies do?

      When you pay interest, or management fees, or brokerage fees, you're doing it on purpose. You've shopped around, chosen the institution you want to do business with, made the choice to use their services and to pay what it costs. You really don't understand how that differs from someone who steals money by using compromised user accounts to take money against your will and without your knowledge?

  • > "and bragged about his exploits"

    Stupid, stupid supervillains.

  • That's worse than getting caught in a police chase on a literbike. With $100M it's possible to make yourself impossible to arrest, worst case scenario you get yourself a nice mansion in the Mexican countryside and hire some ex-military gangsters to run your security.

A holding company is a thing where you hand an accomplice the goods while the policeman searches you.

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