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Japan Security The Almighty Buck IT

Japanese Police Offers First-Ever Reward For Wanted Hacker 63

Posted by samzenpus
from the east-meets-wild-west dept.
alphadogg writes "Japanese police are looking for an individual who can code in C#, uses a 'Syberian Post Office' to make anonymous posts online, and knows how to surf the web without leaving any digital tracks — and they're willing to pay. It is the first time that Japan's National Police Agency has offered a monetary reward for a wanted hacker, or put so much technical detail into one of its wanted postings. The NPA will pay up to $36,000, the maximum allowed under its reward system. The case is an embarrassing one for the police, in which earlier this year 4 individuals were wrongly arrested after their PCs were hacked and used to post messages on public bulletin boards. The messages included warnings of plans for mass killings at an elementary school posted to a city website."
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Japanese Police Offers First-Ever Reward For Wanted Hacker

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  • by GoodNewsJimDotCom (2244874) on Friday December 14, 2012 @01:41AM (#42284415)
    I think hackers have more to fear from the mafia underground than legal authorities. If you get caught by the federalies, they'll put you in prison for a few years, and you can rethink your criminal ways. However... if you start looking for profit with your data breeches, and you start looking into money mule networks then the mafia and seedy underground isn't very far away. What if that breech at the door isn't the feds, but some mafiaa goons who tell you to keep doing what you're doing, but they'll protect you for the cool price of all your profits. People who look to get into a life of crime may find it.

    It is only a matter of time before a crime syndicate forms over all these careless hackers. They could recruit spammers, and hackers could be used to find more hackers...
    • I think hackers have more to fear from the mafia underground than legal authorities.

      LOL, Does your made for Hollywood vision of script kiddies getting swept up in a sea of crime star a young Angelina Jolie flying through 3D cyberspace with her trusty RISC and spray-painted Kom-Pu-Tah? If you ask me, that's a market niche worth mining.

      Oi, Tony, get a load of this prick 'ere pissin' on our cyber-turf? What do you say we pay 'em a lil' visit and make 'em an offer they can't refuse?

      Look, Guido, I know you flunked school -- and fuck teachers -- but this little pissant isn't worth a fuckkin' trip to Japan, you simple non-geographically inclined muther fukker. Besides, we got a deal with the Yakuza, we don't slice their sushi, and they don't bust our meatballs. Capiche?

      Boss-san, my re-pourt: A skeript kehddie crahk-ed sivral of low-cal kom-pu-tah, make poust on line, distrak poulice.

      IDDIOHT! What I pay yiu fo?! Not dis! Hak moh! Make money! No skeript keds! Lucky yiu un-kal my borther!

      • by Joce640k (829181)

        I think hackers have more to fear from the mafia underground than legal authorities.

        LOL, Does your made for Hollywood vision of script kiddies getting swept up in a sea of crime star a young Angelina Jolie flying through 3D cyberspace with her trusty RISC and spray-painted Kom-Pu-Tah? If you ask me, that's a market niche worth mining.

        I'm more worried about how low the qualifications for "Hacker" have sunk over the last few years.

        • Borrowed a friend's laptop, they're still logged into Facebook, I change a few things -> LOL I@M71337H@x0r

          Yes, the quality has dropped. Through the floor. People getting caught for this stuff these days are doing the technological equivalent of jay-walking. And the people spooked by them are the types that they still scared of telling stories around a camp-fire.

    • Data breeches go well with my network clogs.

      Stop using autocorrect.

    • by hAckz0r (989977)

      What if that breech at the door isn't the feds, but some mafiaa goons who tell you to keep doing what you're doing, but they'll protect you for the cool price of all your profits.

      In order for that scenario to happen the Mafia have to be better Internet sleuths than the Feds, and the hacker, otherwise they will never know who the hacker is. If the Mafia are not technically adept to hacking they won't be able to track you down, unless you are stupid enough to not be worth their time. If the Mafia are technically adept enough to track you down then they don't need you, your just in the way. Catch 22.

      Its the hacker that seeks out the Mafia that will get told to keep doing it. If you

  • by slashmydots (2189826) on Friday December 14, 2012 @02:04AM (#42284491)
    Classic framing/griefing. Obviously they should add "and they probably know all 4 of those people" to the evidence list. I guess they overlooked that little tidbit. Otherwise good luck tracking down proxies and Tor exit nodes cuz that info is as worthless as it gets when it comes to finding this person.
    • Classic framing/griefing. Obviously they should add "and they probably know all 4 of those people" to the evidence list. I guess they overlooked that little tidbit. Otherwise good luck tracking down proxies and Tor exit nodes cuz that info is as worthless as it gets when it comes to finding this person.

      Surely not many people use a "Syberian" post office, or even know where to find one.

    • by AmiMoJo (196126) *

      Actually the attacks seem to be random rather than targeted. The suspicion is that people followed malicious links posted on 2ch or downloaded malware from P2P apps.

      We may have seen the perfect cybercrime.

      It's good that the police can at least understand that these people were framed. In the UK the police couldn't even figure out that credit cards used to buy child porn were stolen and it took people years to clear their names, if they didn't commit suicide first.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    WTF is a Syberian Post Office? I've never heard of such a thing, and a google search returns 300 copies of TFA...

    • by ikaruga (2725453) on Friday December 14, 2012 @02:51AM (#42284641)
      If you can read Japanese the definition is in this page [impress.co.jp].
      Basically there is an anonymous board in Japan known as 2ch, which is the "father" of 2chan.net and "grandfather" of 4chan and all other *chan websites. Sometimes your IP is blocked for some reason and you can't post. So you used this Siberian Post Office as some sort of proxy and it posts for you.
  • I love their definition of the 'hacker'.
    It could be basically any tech-savvy young person with these qualifiers:

    Can code in C#: Easiest language ever. With the MS version it basically codes for you, and you just make sure it doesn't do anything stupid.
    Uses a Syberian Post Office: No idea what this is, but assuming some software, I'm sure it's downloadable with some searching.
    Knows how to surf without leaving digital tracks: Clearly, they never heard of TOR and secure anonymous browsers. Easy as pie.

    Not sure

    • Uses a Syberian Post Office: No idea what this is, but assuming some software, I'm sure it's downloadable with some searching.

      I'm guessing its a proxy?

      • That's what I'm reading. Someone coded up a redirector in C#. I'm...I'm not even sure that's a crime here. I mean, it's using someone's resources without their knowledge, but either the English-translation is missing some key info, or Japan has a zero-tolerance policy for, what might considered in other parts of the world, an almost minor transgression.

        So, this person setup a redirector, and the Japanese are offering their highest reward for them. Yeah, we're missing something. I mean, the reward is only $3

      • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

        by Anonymous Coward

        I'm guessing its a proxy?

        Close. After the Russian Revolution, when Stalin began stuffing Siberia with political dissidants, he realized how late the mail was arriving from those territories, making compliance to Party orders lag. Stalin decreed that the mail will be on time, and a clever Siberian post master adjusted the time stamp at his remote post. The mail from Siberia began to arrive in Moscow in record time, so it seemed. Subsequently, there was a Korean manufacturer that produced a router that, in an effort to speed up packe

    • by jrumney (197329)
      "Siberia Post Office" (actually; shiberia in katakana, yubinkyoku in kanji) seems to be his alias on 2ch.net.
  • "Japanese police are looking for an individual who can code in C#"

    Need I say more?

  • by Anonymous Coward

    The first famous Japanese hacker and his handle isn't "The Laughing Man"

  • What if it's a sting? What if they expect the real culprit to attempt to fit someone else up and take the cash?
  • So the hacker's modus operandi is to frame other people? Why do I think that we'll see the hacker frame somebody and then turn that person in for the reward. The reward that the hacker himself created. Twisted. But then so is Orange Juice.

APL is a write-only language. I can write programs in APL, but I can't read any of them. -- Roy Keir

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