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Hackers Stole Information From IAEA Servers

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  • by Anonymous Coward

    OK and if they criticize Israel's nuclear arsenal, then what?

    • by Samantha Wright (1324923) on Wednesday November 28, 2012 @11:41AM (#42117485) Homepage Journal
      Then oh my god you guys, Israel will have so much egg on its face. They won't be able to be seen in public any more. It'd be, like, a big deal. How could the IAEA betray them like that without provocation? They were friends!

      But actually, they're of the opinion that Iranian nuclear scientists have been getting attacked lately [guardian.co.uk], and they want that to stop. The Israel-criticizing was lower on the priority list. I have no idea how the summary missed this.
      • I see the sarcasm, but it's important for people to know that Israel is not a signatory to the NNPT and hence is not bound by its requirements for declarations and inspections. Neither is North Korea, Pakistan, or India, all nations with nuclear arsenals (North Korea's is perhaps debatable), and the only nuclear-armed nation that has not threatened to use one, though their policy of deliberate ambiguity basically precludes such threats.

  • by gcnaddict (841664) on Wednesday November 28, 2012 @11:41AM (#42117491)
    Parastoo means swallow (as in the bird) in Farsi, for anyone wondering.
  • by jeffy210 (214759) on Wednesday November 28, 2012 @11:45AM (#42117543)

    "...but that it was of a decommissioned server."

    Um, who cares if it's live, going, or in a pile in a room. If it has valid data on it it is still a viable target and needs to be secured in whatever way is necessary. It's even worse if it was a system that was still online, supposed to be marked for decommissioned and they just didn't keep up on securing it anymore.

    • by Rick Zeman (15628)

      "...but that it was of a decommissioned server."

      Um, who cares if it's live, going, or in a pile in a room. If it has valid data on it it is still a viable target and needs to be secured in whatever way is necessary. It's even worse if it was a system that was still online, supposed to be marked for decommissioned and they just didn't keep up on securing it anymore.

      No kidding. If it was decommissioned the drives would be destroyed at best, powered off and offline at worst.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    They, along with India, Pakistan, and North Korea, are not signatories to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. That's a pretty poor club to be in, but if we're going to complain, we should complain about all of them for not signing up. I don't see a particular reason to pick on Israel. Unlike the other three, it isn't even clear they've done any nuclear tests.

    If this is about other countries that are chafing under the restrictions of the NPT (==Iran), then tough. You signed up for it. Deal with it or

  • phew! (Score:5, Funny)

    by MagicM (85041) on Wednesday November 28, 2012 @11:57AM (#42117691)

    I misread that as "Hackers Stole Information From IKEA Servers". I was worried there for a moment.

  • On the topic of scientific organizations being hacked:
    If Astronomers get hacked is the scandal a "Star-gate"?
  • by jeff13 (255285)

    Well that's so Tuesday. Would you swallow? Funny that the AP came out with this story just yesterday...

    AP Exclusive: Graph suggests Iran working on bomb
    http://bigstory.ap.org/article/ap-exclusive-graph-suggests-iran-working-bomb [ap.org]

    Isn't it great Iranians work in English?

    Oh, my favourite part; "leaked by officials from a country critical of Iran's atomic program ..." ROTFL! Geee, wonder who THAT could be?

    • The left side of the graph labels the power output in kT/sec with a plateau around 1.6E13 (16,000,000,000,000 kT). This strikes me as problematic.

      So, too, does the part of the article that says, "The bomb that the United States dropped on Hiroshima...had a force of about 15 kilotons. Modern nuclear weapons have yields hundreds of times higher than that." A handful of weapons are in the megaton range, but most weapons are 300kT or smaller. It's enough to devastate a military base or a city core, but it's

  • I would assume the data would have more damning information on Iran's nuclear plans versus Israel, but that is just a guess.

    Anyone have any educated knowledge about what kind of data they could be releasing that would be unknown to the general public?
  • Why does a decommissioned server still have valid data on it nevermind remaining online and accessible to the world?

  • by JSBiff (87824) on Wednesday November 28, 2012 @01:52PM (#42119461) Journal

    As far as I know, IAEA is energy focused, not weapons, and so wouldn't keep things like CAD files for nuclear weapons or parts on its server. From the article, it sounds like it was information stolen about people who've worked with/for IAEA?

  • I'm seeing a huge inconsistency between data 'theft' or 'stealing' and 'pirating' here on Slashdot. I read the article and didn't see any reference to the original data being deleted. Was it just copied or "pirated", or was it actually taken off the machine with the original data removed?

    • by Anonymous Coward

      I'm seeing a huge inconsistency between data 'theft' or 'stealing' and 'pirating' here on Slashdot. I read the article and didn't see any reference to the original data being deleted. Was it just copied or "pirated", or was it actually taken off the machine with the original data removed?

      The difference between piracy and theft is that theft deprives the original owner of something. In this case, they have deprived the owner of the secrecy/exclusivity of the data. So it would be more technically accurate to say they stole "secrets" but that gets clunky to say so in common language we just say that the information was stolen.
      Context matters.

  • Maybe JYSK was behind the attacks!
    No! I want to live in my happy pocket universe. :(
    • by PPH (736903)
      Assembly instructions for the Fjell uranium enrichment centrifuge, no doubt.
  • Now, which one will get more comments about how it is wrong: The use of the word "Hacker", or the use of the word "stole"? :-)

  • I have far too much taste to furnish my home with kitschy Swedish ready-to-assemble tables and cabinets.

    Oh, wait...

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