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GoDaddy Goes Down, Anonymous Claims Responsibility 483

Posted by samzenpus
from the protect-ya-neck dept.
An anonymous reader writes "A member of the Anonymous hacktivist group appears to have taken down GoDaddy with a massive Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS). The widespread issue seems to be affecting countless websites and services around the world, although not for everyone. Godaddy.com is down, but so are some of the site's DNS servers, which means GoDaddy hosted e-mail accounts are down as well, and lots more. It's currently unclear if the servers are being unresponsive or if they are completely offline. Either way, the result is that if your DNS is hosted on GoDaddy, your site may also look as if it is down, because it cannot resolve."
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GoDaddy Goes Down, Anonymous Claims Responsibility

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  • This is big (Score:5, Funny)

    by Terry Pearson (935552) on Monday September 10, 2012 @03:23PM (#41291631) Homepage Journal
    I was just noticing the large number of sites that are down. I hope it gets resolved soon!
  • Now you jerk faces are affecting actual Interstate commerce on a massive scale. My own website is down. If you didn't get the attention of the FBI before, you have it now.
    • by i286NiNJA (2558547) on Monday September 10, 2012 @03:27PM (#41291691)

      Hate to blame the victim but why on earth are you using godaddy who supports anyone having the ability to take your website down?

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by Bryansix (761547)
        What information are you basing this one? GoDaddy itself does not appear down. This appears to be a DNS exploit. That would put .... oh I don't know... every single host on earth at risk.
        • by Aqualung812 (959532) on Monday September 10, 2012 @03:35PM (#41291831)

          His point is that GoDaddy supported SOPA, which allowed companies to shut down websites on a whim.

          If you continued to support GoDaddy after learning about this, then it is assumed you're fine with people's websites being shutdown for no good reason.

          Therefore, why are you upset now?

          You're the roofer on the Death Star. You knew the risks.

          • by achbed (97139) <.gro.debhca. .ta. .ds.> on Monday September 10, 2012 @03:45PM (#41291979) Homepage Journal

            On top of that, you didn't read the TOS from GoDaddy. That allows *them* to turn your site off on a whim without prior notice. This might just be the hackers turning on the built-in kill switch for every GoDaddy site simultaneously.

          • by MachDelta (704883) on Monday September 10, 2012 @04:01PM (#41292211)

            You're the roofer on the Death Star.

            B-but... it's a sphere? How? Where... does the roof? I... i'm so confused.... Shouldn't he also be the, uh, waller... and flooring guy...? My childhood... crumbling... Nnooooooooooooo!

            Oh well, at least I still have Clerks...

          • by InvisiBill (706958) <`ten.llibisivni' `ta' `todhsals'> on Monday September 10, 2012 @04:30PM (#41292605) Homepage

            His point is that GoDaddy supported SOPA, which allowed companies to shut down websites on a whim.

            If you continued to support GoDaddy after learning about this, then it is assumed you're fine with people's websites being shutdown for no good reason.

            Therefore, why are you upset now?

            You're the roofer on the Death Star. You knew the risks.

            Actually, his point is probably that GoDaddy's policies, regardless of SOPA/PIPA support, allow them to shut down websites on a whim. They've repeatedly demonstrated this by completely shutting down entire accounts when served a DMCA complaint for one site. http://yro.slashdot.org/story/12/05/25/1744246/photographer-threatened-with-legal-action-after-asserting-his-copyright [slashdot.org] is one example. (Part of the reason she went crazy was that all of her sites, including one regarding special needs children, were suspended after GoDaddy received the DMCA complaint over one photo on one specific site.)

            GoDaddy has made it clear that it takes very little to convince them to suspend a customer's entire account. If you choose to use GoDaddy's services, that's a risk you're taking.

          • by clarkkent09 (1104833) on Monday September 10, 2012 @04:38PM (#41292713)

            A lot of companies (and unions) supported SOPA: http://www.scribd.com/doc/76259944/SOPA-Supporters [scribd.com]

            Therefore, why are you upset now?

            Do you use a MasterCard or VISA? Do you watch ABC, follow pro football or basketball, buy books published by Random House, HarperCollins or McGraw-Hill, are a paying member of any of a dozen unions, buy any products made by Revlon, Pfizer, LOreal, Sony and a hundred other companies?

            According to your logic, if any of the above is true, you should not be upset if a group of random hackers shuts down your website and causes you financial harm.

            • by Twinbee (767046) on Monday September 10, 2012 @06:51PM (#41294129) Homepage
              This point has been brought up before. 'Godaddy' should have known better since they're in the technology business sector. Their whole business revolves around the lifeblood of the internet. I think practically every other registrar wasn't involved with SOPA one bit.

              More to the point though, Goddaddy is simply a less efficient company compared to many, and the world would be better off without them (no offense intended, since it'd be great to free up their time for more productive tasks, or simply free time for its own sake).
        • You misunderstand. Godaddy supported SOPA. Essentially they support anyone claiming to be a content owner taking your site down for infringement while the claim is investigated. Why not go with a better cheaper provider anyhow?

        • by Sulphur (1548251)

          What information are you basing this one? GoDaddy itself does not appear down. This appears to be a DNS exploit. That would put .... oh I don't know... every single host on earth at risk.

          The Web is falling, the Web is falling, and I have a piece of it right here.

      • My domain is registered with Gandi, but my web site is on Go Daddy. I feel like switching to another provider. What entry-level web hosting provider would you recommend using instead of Go Daddy? Is Dreamhost much better?
        • by heypete (60671) <pete@heypete.com> on Monday September 10, 2012 @03:44PM (#41291963) Homepage

          If you're already with Gandi, check out their Simple Hosting. It's pretty slick, as far as basic hosting goes: you get your own Apache/MySQL/PHP processes, the web server runs with the same permissions as your user account (so setting up stuff like WordPress is trivial as there's no permissions-related issues), can host multiple separate sites on a single instance, etc.

          Their VPSs are pretty standard paravirtualized Xen systems which work out pretty well (I ran a Team Fortress 2 gameserver for a while on one and it was stable and reliable).

          As a domain customer you get a 50% discount code for the first year ($30/year rather than $60/year).

          Disclaimer: Gandi customer, not employed by them in any way.

          • Personally I wouldn't put my name registrations and my hosting (ideally including DNS hosting) in the same place. There are a couple of reasons for this.

            Firstly afaict when the shit hits the fan at a domain name register it is common for the entries in the registery to stay in place but the admin interface to be down. When the shit hits the fan at a hosting provider it is very likely that everything they host goes down. So if your registeration and hosting are at the same provider and the shit hits the fan

        • by vlm (69642)

          What entry-level web hosting provider would you recommend using instead of Go Daddy?

          Everyone loves hurricane electric. Rather than using a webhost everyone hates like godaddy, why not use a webhost everyone loves like he.net, even ex-customers like me? Trust me, no one is stupid enough to hire me as a booth babe, so you know this is not astroturfing.

          And I don't wanna hear comments from the peanut gallery about how they're not the cheapest. Yes, not being the cheapest is often a side effect of not sucking.

        • by belg4mit (152620)

          HostGator. I've used BlueHost too, but HostGator's been more responsive and techie friendly.

      • by cjjjer (530715) <cjjjer@hotmBOHRail.com minus physicist> on Monday September 10, 2012 @04:18PM (#41292443)
        And how in your brain is Anonymous forcefully taking down websites based on their ideals any different than the Gov. using SOPA to take down websites?

        Pot meet kettle, Hey! We're both black who-da-thunk!
    • by h4rr4r (612664) on Monday September 10, 2012 @03:35PM (#41291843)

      You could host your own dns, like a big boy.

      This is what happens when you push everything out into the cloud. Somedays it rains and there ain't shit you can do about it.

      • by Bryansix (761547) on Monday September 10, 2012 @03:41PM (#41291919) Homepage
        You are right, I could. I don't sit on mutiple ISPs in a SAS70 rated datacenter with diverse physical location redundancy and power backup. So I let them do it. It would be trivial for me to move my DNS records. That totally misses the point. The hacking is causing loss of productivity. I know this is funny to you but for the people affected it is a giant waste of time and nothing will be accomplished by it.
        • by h4rr4r (612664)

          You don't, but if you did your DNS would still work.

          I think it is bad that this happened, but this is what you get whenever you put your eggs in one basket.

          It is not funny to me, other than finding out what companies my company does business with that we clearly should not be since they let godaddy host their DNS.

      • by macklin01 (760841) on Monday September 10, 2012 @05:20PM (#41293225) Homepage

        It's affecting a lot more than commerce.

        My cancer research website is down, too. (Only works on computers that had cached the DNS entries.) So much for inviting seminar speakers today.

        I'm an academic. I set my site up years ago (before all the SOPA business) and don't have time to muck with moving my site around, hosting DNS here and content there, and the like. I barely have time to maintain content in the middle of a busy research career. I suppose I'm now supposed to be an expert on mathematical modeling + cancer + hosting my own DNS?

        It's always worth keeping in mind that these things affect far more than business sites.

        • by LodCrappo (705968) on Monday September 10, 2012 @06:39PM (#41294055) Homepage

          If you take your project seriously and believe your website is an important part of it, you simply must acquire the skill to make good decisions regarding it's implementation or hire an expert who can do this for you. You cannot stick your head in the sand and cry "I'm too busy, too important!" and expect any sympathy from me. Do you use that approach as an excuse for every area in which you fail to bring in proper expertise?

          GoDaddy has a long track record of poor service and questionable practices the predates any SOPA business by many years. They offer nothing unique and have dozens of more reputable competitors. There is only one reason anyone uses GoDaddy: low cost.

          This is your responsibility. Certainly you didn't end up using GoDaddy's services purely by random chance. A decision was made by someone, and it was made poorly. Probably someone trying to save a few bucks. It's highly unlikely that this will be the only ramification of that bad decision. It's also somewhat likely that other, similarly poor choices have been made in how your technical infrastructure is designed.

    • by Cinder6 (894572) on Monday September 10, 2012 @03:53PM (#41292113)

      Well, it explains why my podcast app didn't update my favorite podcast--just ran a whois to confirm that they're hosted on GoDaddy.

      What's obnoxious about something like this is that the attack isn't likely to get the attention of the general public. Most people will see their favorite site is down, say "Aw, shucks," and check again later. The news likely won't even mention this, what with election season going on and giving them better yellow journalism fodder. The people who will know the reason why some of their favorite sites are down are like those here on Slashdot: The same people that already dislike GoDaddy.

      I'm not saying that protest is a bad thing--far from it. But ineffective protest is. All this attack accomplishes is to hurt the little guy--the people who use GoDaddy.

      But maybe I'm wrong. Maybe GoDaddy's customers will all jump ship because of this. I doubt it, though.

      • by Okian Warrior (537106) on Monday September 10, 2012 @05:08PM (#41293061) Homepage Journal

        What's obnoxious about something like this is that the attack isn't likely to get the attention of the general public. Most people will see their favorite site is down, say "Aw, shucks," and check again later.

        "Most people" aren't the target audience here. The target audience is IT administrators who are given the task of choosing a domain hosting solution.

        Domain hosting choice involves a lot of factors such as cost, customer satisfaction, down-time, and so on. If Anonymous can insert a new factor "being down due to backlash from unethical behaviour", they will have accomplished their goal.

        Numerous studies show that tiny influences can have a noticeable effect on large populations. We see this all the time where human decision-making is involved - tiny influences will not sway any individual decision, but those same tiny effects have enough of an effect to be measurable in the population at large.

        That's what Anonymous (or rather, the hacker with "Anonymous" in his name) is doing here - generating a new, tiny influence which might have an effect on the overall population.

        They are bringing "company reputation" back into the purchase decision process.

  • by BooRadley (3956) on Monday September 10, 2012 @03:23PM (#41291641)

    Back when GoDaddy was publicly in support of SOPA, I moved away from them. Ended up saving a lot as well.

    No regrets.
     

    • by achbed (97139)

      Ditto. Tried a few different hosts, and eventually settled on gandi.net - works like a charm! A little more expensive, but I like the option of having duplicated virtual hosts on two continents just in case of failure...

    • by GoodNewsJimDotCom (2244874) on Monday September 10, 2012 @03:59PM (#41292191)
      Yep. I moved from Godaddy when they supported SOPA too.

      All seriousness aside: By looking at the scantily clad women they advertise with, is it any surprise they go down?
  • "Activism" (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 10, 2012 @03:24PM (#41291651)

    Hmm, attacking innocent people at random, could have sworn there was some other word for that...

    • by vlm (69642) on Monday September 10, 2012 @04:05PM (#41292263)

      Hmm, attacking innocent people at random, could have sworn there was some other word for that...

      "US Military Drone Attack" Hmm thats 4 words.

      "Civil forfeiture" Hmm 2 words.

      "Obama" or "Bush" ? Yeah I founds it.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 10, 2012 @03:26PM (#41291679)

    Anonymous member AnonymousOwn3r has stated that this was not an Anonymous operation, and that he did this by himself.

  • I guess somewhere down the line we may get an answer, but I really have to wonder: Why GoDaddy?

  • An elderly lady crossed the sidewalk, Anonymous claims responsibility.
  • Those G rated porn TV commercials now just mock me!
  • by JDG1980 (2438906) on Monday September 10, 2012 @03:32PM (#41291765)

    Events like this further underline why we need a new secure, distributed DNS system, one that is not subject to tampering by either Anonymous or ICE. Yes, there's a huge installed base issue to deal with, but DNS is falling apart, and if things continue the way they have been, the Internet may be completely balkanized across national lines in a few more years.

  • by alphax45 (675119) <[moc.liamg] [ta] [derfla.elyk]> on Monday September 10, 2012 @03:32PM (#41291767)
    Not saying that people that choose Go Daddy deserve to have their sites down, I don't blame the victim for choosing them as their provider, however Go Daddy is not exactly the most ethical company. I can see why they would be targeted in such an attack.
  • by hwstar (35834) on Monday September 10, 2012 @03:33PM (#41291799)

    If you have registered your domain with Godaddy, and used a third party DNS, everything will be fine. I've found it's better to use a 3rd party DNS as it allows more flexibility in managing the domain name.

    • My site is on Go Daddy shared web hosting. How does one use a third-party DNS in such an environment? I thought using a third-party DNS required at least that a site have its own dedicated IPv4 address, not the single IPv4 address shared among a thousand unrelated sites that is typical of name-based virtual hosting.
  • by sl4shd0rk (755837) on Monday September 10, 2012 @03:35PM (#41291839)

    you know, to let them know their network is down.

  • Danica OK (Score:2, Funny)

    by trevc (1471197)
    The important question that needs to be answered; is Danica Patrick OK?
  • Perhaps it was this. [theregister.co.uk]
  • by yooy (1146753) on Monday September 10, 2012 @03:38PM (#41291881)
    By chance GoDaddy holds one of my domain since several days for ransom. Expiration date is tomorrow and they wont release it and delaying, reviewing, delaying. Requesting me to write them from an email under the domain name, not realizing that I am already doing this and they actually answering me to an email under the exact domain name. I guess to force me to renew with them due to the expiration date is their goal. Well, they manged. I have to renew today and now I can't even do that. The review60 team at GoDaddy is a class of its own. Besides shooting elephants, half naked girls and SOPA support, they just show unorthodox, unprofessional, possibly illegal business practices. DO NOT DO BUSINESS WITH THEM! (The DOS attack is not their fault)
  • by maitai (46370)

    Honestly, it looks more like a routing issue to me. Our production servers can't reach Godaddy's DNS servers at all, but other computers in the same NOC (different IP blocks) have no issue. Our in office server and desktops (as well as my home server and computers) also have no issue with contacting Godaddy's DNS servers.

    I could be wrong of course. But I'm really only experiencing issues with contacting Godaddy's DNS servers from certain machines while others have no issue at all (can't get to their webs

  • by Marble68 (746305) on Monday September 10, 2012 @03:51PM (#41292085) Homepage

    So a bunch of non-profit groups I support are down thanks to these "activists".
    SOPA opposition, "ends justify the means even if it means f*cking over everyone with our scorched earth actions", and the "if you were stupid enough to be supporting our enemy then you are just collateral damage because we are so right we're justified in harming you to make a point" aside, I don't think it will win them many fans.

  • Seems to be up.
  • by bobbutts (927504) <bobbutts@gmail.com> on Monday September 10, 2012 @05:17PM (#41293177)
    Their plan is to advertise the most, so every idiot who decides to create a site on a whim chooses them. Complete the deal with insanely cheap promotional pricing. Then count on them being unwilling to face the technical challenge of switching to a reasonably priced host before their plan recurs at a heavily inflated price.

"A great many people think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices." -- William James

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