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Have Your Fingerprints Read From 6 Meters Away 122

Posted by timothy
from the give-'em-the-finger-prints dept.
First time accepted submitter Burdell writes "A new startup has technology to read fingerprints from up to 6 meters away. IDair currently sells to the military, but they are beta testing it with a chain of 24-hour fitness centers that want to restrict sharing of access cards. IDair also wants to sell this to retail stores and credit card companies as a replacement for physical cards. Lee Tien from the EFF notes that the security of such fingerprint databases is a privacy concern." Since the last time this technology was mentioned more than a year ago, it seems that the claimed range for reading has tripled, and the fingerprint reader business has been spun off from the company at which development started.
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Have Your Fingerprints Read From 6 Meters Away

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  • That won't be abused
    • Re:Yeah... (Score:5, Funny)

      by KingMotley (944240) on Thursday June 21, 2012 @03:49PM (#40403683) Journal

      I don't know about fingerprints at 6 meters away, but if they come up with a miniature portable through the clothes scanner (ALA TSA) that can scan people from 6 meters away, I'll be happy to take it through a chain of 24-hour fitness centers to beta test it for them.

  • Gloves (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday June 21, 2012 @01:31PM (#40401829)

    So are we going back to the habit of wearing silk gloves all the time now? I wouldn't mind that.

    • Re:Gloves (Score:5, Funny)

      by kanto (1851816) on Thursday June 21, 2012 @02:42PM (#40402815)

      So are we going back to the habit of wearing silk gloves all the time now? I wouldn't mind that.

      Silk gloves for fingerprints, beekeeper suit so as to not shed DNA in the wrong place, mask to obscure facial recognition and a wonky shoes to evade gait detection... Michael Jackson may have been sent from the future.

      • by kanto (1851816)

        So are we going back to the habit of wearing silk gloves all the time now? I wouldn't mind that.

        Silk gloves for fingerprints, beekeeper suit so as to not shed DNA in the wrong place, mask to obscure facial recognition and a wonky shoes to evade gait detection... Michael Jackson may have been sent from the future.

        Note to self from the future: invest in stealth casual wear.

        • Just have a couple of IR-emitting LEDs on your person. The cameras get flooded, eyeballs can't tell the difference.

          • by cstacy (534252)

            Just have a couple of IR-emitting LEDs on your person. The cameras get flooded, eyeballs can't tell the difference.

            In some states (such as Virginia) it is a felony to hide your face in public (e.g. with a mask or a veil).
            http://law.justia.com/codes/virginia/2006/toc1802000/18.2-422.html

            I predict there will be a federal law soon, saying the same thing about IR lighting your face.

  • Absolutely not ... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by gstoddart (321705) on Thursday June 21, 2012 @01:33PM (#40401863) Homepage

    If a gym, retail store, or credit card company ask for my finger prints, they will get told in no uncertain terms to politely go fsck themselves.

    Not happening.

    If you aint law enforcement, don't even bother asking.

    • by kwiqsilver (585008) on Thursday June 21, 2012 @01:35PM (#40401891)

      If you aint law enforcement, don't even bother asking.

      s/law enforcment/law enforcement with a valid warrant/

      • by nedlohs (1335013) on Thursday June 21, 2012 @01:45PM (#40402057)

        They don't need a warrant. They just need to arrest you. If you don't think they have a valid reason to arrest you and don't comply then resisting arrest becomes their reason.

        You can sue them later, but good luck with that and with getting those prints out of the system.

    • by MilwaukeeMadAss (2521372) on Thursday June 21, 2012 @01:42PM (#40402005) Homepage
      "Hi. Would you like to open an account today with your purchase? You can save 10%! All we ask is a photo ID and email address that we can reach you at. Oh, and we'll also need a scan of your fingerprints, DNA swab and allow us to implant this teeny tiny device at the base of your skill just beneath your skin. What? Oh don't worry, it only transmits audio commercials to your ear every three minutes. I wouldn't recommend standing near a microwave because you'll piss your pants and forget who you are for about an hour or so."
      • by Culture20 (968837)

        forget who you are for about an hour or so

        Where do I sign up?

        • Out back behind the building next to the second dumpster. Tell the guy there that you're looking for Freddy Fingers. He'll get you sorted out. And don't forget to sign up for our Rewards Program! It's convenient. Simply swipe your ankle monitoring bracelet and you'll instantly receive 2% savings on all purchases.
        • I heard about this place called Recall...
    • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday June 21, 2012 @01:43PM (#40402015)

      Why do they need to ask if they can read it from a distance?

    • by rickb928 (945187)

      If my gym tells me that the member that body slammed me in the locker room wasn't even in the building at the time, because the video shows some other clown used their card, I'll stil be asking for that member to be sent off. If they can match fingerprints and stop this roided-out putsz at the door, fair enough.

      I use my fingerprint AND an RFID card to get into work. And I like my job. Biometrics are coming to you. Prepare.

    • I think the point is, if they can read them from 6 meters away, they don't need to ask in the first place. They have your fingerprints the second you walk through the door. Hell, every department store in the country could have the system built into the front door and then follow you about the store with cameras. Basically everything you do, anywhere, will be tracked, logged and used to either get your money or your vote. Welcome to the future.
    • by chrismcb (983081)
      My gym does this. I don't participate. Every once in a while they ask if I know about their cardless system. "Yes I know, that is why I don't do it"
      "I don't think you guys need my fingerprints."
      They always respond with "We don't store your fingerprints." One guy said "we only store a couple of points." Ok, so you don't store the whole fingerprint, just a portion? "No, it is just biometrics."
      And what exactly do you think a digital fingerprint is?
      Ugh
    • The gym I go to required my fingerprints.

      Of course, I volunteer there, and all the volunteers require a Vulnerable Sector Screening.

  • Theres no way to hack, replicate or go around this fingerprint... o.O
  • Right... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by roc97007 (608802) on Thursday June 21, 2012 @01:37PM (#40401907) Journal

    ...because there is no way criminal elements could abuse this technology...

    I think we've just eliminated fingerprints as a viable identification method.

    • by Blindman (36862)
      At least initially, replicating someone's fingerprints should be too expensive for general use. Most of us wouldn't be worth impersonating.
    • by Anonymous Coward

      yep. this device is not magic. it appears to be simply a camera with a decent lens, resolution, and lots of DSP.

      it doesn't have security features lots of 0-distance readers have, such as temperature, conductivity, etc. checks.

      therefore, highly susceptible to being faked out with e.g. photos of a fingerprint or even gummi fingers.

      enjoy ur false sense of security, users of this machine!

    • ...because there is no way criminal elements could abuse this technology...

      I think we've just eliminated fingerprints as a viable identification method.

      Contrary to popular opinion, fingerprints never were a viable method, thanks to confirmation bias.

      Proof here [psmag.com]

    • by AmiMoJo (196126)

      Back when signatures were used to verify credit card transactions I had all sorts of problems with them. I injured my hand and couldn't reproduce the signature on my card very well. If we start using fingerprints then a single burn could make it very difficult for a person to live because not only will all their ID become invalid but they won't be able to make new forms of ID as they no longer have any fingerprints.

  • not a good thing (Score:5, Interesting)

    by wierd_w (1375923) on Thursday June 21, 2012 @01:42PM (#40401993)

    I don't think perfect identification, be it biometric, technological, or other, is in any way a good thing.

    There are perfectly valid reasons for needing or wanting aliases, which are not associated with being a criminal.

    Take for instance, employees of a collections agency. These are people who perform a distasteful, but still required service. Nobody really likes being called by a bill collector, nor do they like having to use one to get deadbeat clients to pay up. Deadbeats especially, despise bill collectors, and some are even belligerent enough to be a real physical threat to collection employees. This is why many collections agencies provide work aliases for call center staff, etc. If a foolproof means of identifying people is developed, these employees are at risk.

    Then you have the quintessential witness protection program. These are people that have witnessed a violent or serious crime, and are now embroiled through no fault of their own in some serious shit. If Big Tony can perfectly identify them through his ring of heavies using foolproof tech, this program becomes effectively worthless.

    and last, but certainly far from least, you have the serious problems with the Feds, and their "Papers Please!" abuses. History does a fine job of explaining, in graphic, nightmare inducing detail, exactly why perfectly being identifiable by government officials is bad bad juju.

    People making startups, and companies offering products:

    I understand that there is a very strong demand for this kind of technology. Please also understand exactly *why* there is a demand for this kind of technology, and what it opens the door to. Is landing a fat contract and making bank worth endangering people's lives, and being directly complicit in abuses of power that very well inevitably kill people really worth it?

    I personally dont think it is.

    This kind of technology, in the broad and general sense, is not a good thing. Please stop developing it.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Pandora's box of technology is already open. Our only option now is to try to shape the future, not return to the past. Don't close it with hope still inside.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Frosty Piss (770223) *

      Take for instance, employees of a collections agency. These are people who perform a distasteful, but still required service. Nobody really likes being called by a bill collector, nor do they like having to use one to get deadbeat clients to pay up. Deadbeats especially, despise bill collectors, and some are even belligerent enough to be a real physical threat to collection employees. This is why many collections agencies provide work aliases for call center staff, etc. If a foolproof means of identifying people is developed, these employees are at risk.

      If you fear being associated with your employer, perhaps you should work someplace else? Also, you seem like a very judgmental person - I mean "deadbeats"? Have you conseidered the current economic environment and the fact that a LOT of people have lost their jobs?

      • Re:not a good thing (Score:5, Informative)

        by wierd_w (1375923) on Thursday June 21, 2012 @02:20PM (#40402519)

        It doesn't matter what the circumstances are, really. If you take out a huge debt, then default, and then refuse to pay, you are a deadbeat client.

        A collections agency deals exclusively with such clients. Some are honest people who have had a serious problem happen, such as a death in the family, a serious illness, or injury. Most of the people I know who work in collections are more than happy to work out an equitable payment plan for such people, if they can prove their condition.

        The problem, is that there are also "Dedicated deadbeats" out there. They game the system for all it is worth, rack up debts of unbelievable amounts, then move, change their names, liquidate their on-credit purchases for cash, and settle somewhere else, leaving other people to hold the bag of their shit. These people invent sob stories all the time, hoping to weasle out of their obligations. Dealing with these people makes collections people innately distrustful and cynical.

        I actually interned at a collection agency for awhile. I got to see just what percentages of the debtors were real, diehard deadbeats. we are talking people with a paper file that weighs 10 pounds, with 50 aliases.

        These people far outnumber the honest debtors. Most honest people will try to bend over backwards to pay a bill before it reaches a collection agency. The people collection agencies deal with are the people that absolutely refuse to pay, despite being notified for months on end, as a usual practice.

        Collection agencies are like trash collectors. They are not a glamorous vocation, and like trash collectors, being one puts you at risk. Trash collectors get unregistered medical waste from things like insulin syrenges in the trash that could stick them. They get exposed to all kinds of toxic chemical shit. Bill collectors have to work with people that would rather kill the bill collector than pay the bill.

        As much as you seem to hate the bill collectors, they provide a valuable and essential service to modern society. There is no such thing as a free lunch, and often times, the bill collectors are all that stands between a glut of people gaming the system, and ruining it for everyone else.

        Do you like running water? Electricity? Those services are not free to provide, and paying the people to provide them is how you get them. Most bills processed at the company I interned at were utility bills. With people wanting free utilities, by getting them in other people's names, under false names, and abusing the system in so many ways i cant even describe them all.

        Contrary to what you might believe, a collections agency *CAN* pull your credit history, and see that while you owe a huge ass debt, you also spent 1000$ on a new laptop at newegg. As such, when you give a sob story about being laid off, they arent going to believe you. That 1000$ could have paid your 500$ debt, and left some over. Why didnt you make an effort to pay your debt?

        Again, for the people who really *ARE* impoverished, their histories will clearly show that. You would be surprised how a properly informed agency can actually benefit such a debtor.

        But of course, you hate collections people, because they make people pay what they legally owe.

        but thanks for the derail anyway.

        • by garbut (1990152)

          I don't think it's fair to use the term deadbeats to refer to everyone who can't repay their debts. Some are unable to repay through no fault of their own. It's a mathematical certainty and the banks are aware of it. They created the system that causes it.

          Money is created as debt [youtube.com]. The principal comes into existence whenever money is borrowed from the bank - the bank just creates it out of thin air [youtube.com]. If there were no debt, there would be no money.

          One of the problems with the system is that the interest i

          • by kanto (1851816)

            Money comes to existence when it's borrowed from _central_ banks and the interest paid to the central bank ensures that the money has to be invested. As for the idea that it's a pyramid scheme I think it's a bit ridiculous, it's like saying the ever increasing production of goods and services in the economy itself isn't real and the only thing that is real is money.

            The value of money comes from the fact that it's the legal currency and people are allowed to themselves value it as they wish. I'd hate to thin

            • by garbut (1990152)
              I'm not sure of your point.
              • by kanto (1851816)

                If I understood you correctly you claim having to pay interest on loans is the cause why people default on their them, unless of course the central bank continuously loans more money to cover the "gap". I'm saying this doesn't take into account the fact that most of the time economies themselves grow and increase the wealth associated with them that is then used to pay the loans. Although the economy can't print money it can offset the "gap" by growing.

                • by garbut (1990152)

                  Right, so if I understand, the system can work if and only if the bank spends every penny of interest earned on goods, services, salaries... If the bank keeps, invests or re-lends any of the interest earnings, then we're doomed, or at least some of us will have to default, which I think is what's happening.

                  Still, best case is that all the money in circulation is borrowed from these private corporations and they're sucking up compound interest for doing virtually nothing. Would you agree then that the valu

        • But if these deadbeats who try and game the system could be positively identified it would stop the problem before it happens. If you take fraud from the mix, you take away a lot of the problems with lending money, probably at the cost of many jobs in the collections industry.
        • Well, I'm a deadbeat. However, from my perspective you are nothing more than a bottom-feeding leech. I didn't make an agreement with your company. You paid off my debt with an existing company for pennies on the dollar and hope to harass me into paying, often times inventing fees or whatever you think you can get away with to soak people who may not know any better.
          My brother had a friend that ran several credit collections companies. It turned out they were front organizations for organized crime.
      • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

        by Anonymous Coward

        He's being accurate:
        Deadbeat
        (n)
        1. One who does not pay one's debts.
        http://www.thefreedictionary.com/deadbeat

    • by Nyder (754090)

      ...

      Take for instance, employees of a collections agency. These are people who perform a distasteful, but still required service. Nobody really likes being called by a bill collector, nor do they like having to use one to get deadbeat clients to pay up. Deadbeats especially, despise bill collectors, and some are even belligerent enough to be a real physical threat to collection employees. This is why many collections agencies provide work aliases for call center staff, etc. If a foolproof means of identifying people is developed, these employees are at risk.

      Seriously dude, WTF?

      Collection agencies are scum of the earth. They buy, in bulk and for very cheap, your debts, then harass you and your family to pay the bills. There has been numerous laws put on the books to protect people from bill collectors, mainly from the tactics that these people use.

      These Collection Agencies are NOT any different then the Law firms that sue you on "behalf" of the Entertainment Industry.

      In case you don't understand, lets put this in perspective. I owe you $50, and I haven't paid you yet, for whatever reason. You get tired of waiting, so you sell my debt of $50 to someone for lets say, $5. So are you going to be surprised when I don't pay that person $50? In fact, since I never had an agreement with that person, I do NOT plan on paying him shit. If you are stupid enough to sell my debt to you, then you just lost out your chance of getting your money.

      And since you don't seem to understand, sometimes life sucks and you get behind in payments. Now, you might be able to pull yourself out, but a lot of times they won't work with you. You pay the $500 you owe now, or we send it to the collection agency. How you going to pay $500 now if you got no money? Does that make you a deadbeat? With the economy how it's been, fuck no. Banks get bailed out, people get shit on.

      • by wierd_w (1375923)

        actually, I know people who used to run a collections agency. (now retired)

        Most agencies that are worth a shit will work with clients to get a suitable arrangement going.

        The problem is that many people refuse to make any effort at such an arrangement, or demand an arrangement that is unworkable for the collection agency. (The agency at most gets around 30% of the value of the bill. this means that your 100$ bill to little ceasar's is only worth 30$ to the bill collector. This is why they refuse to accept 5

      • You might not like collections agencies, but they do perform a legitimate service. If the bank merely dropped the debt, they'd have to raise fees (or cry for more bailout money) to cover the losses, and the rest of us would end up paying. I've never dealt with a collections agency from the other side, but I have written code for a sub-prime lender, and met a few in-house collections people. They weren't "scum of the earth" they were people trying to convince someone to uphold his part of an agreement. Witho

    • by steelfood (895457)

      For every lock that was developed, there's also a lockpick.

      It's the same for this. Just need to come up with a good lockpick. Something easy and ubiquitious enough that every person probably already possesses it.

      Facial recognition can be defeated easily with a hood or a brimmed hat. Fingerprints can be defeated with gloves. And if certain services become draconian, then simply vote with your wallet.

  • by Overzeetop (214511) on Thursday June 21, 2012 @01:47PM (#40402079) Journal

    Something you are. This is just one of three.

    It's funny they talk about not being connected to major crime databases - your employer would have a local copy that would be used for building access. Sure right up until they passed it off as part of your background check they'll run on everyone now. All part of your 90 day probationary period!

    • by dkleinsc (563838)

      The thing is, in case of compromise altering the stuff you have and the stuff you know is far easier than altering the stuff you are. For example, how would you easily replace a thumbprint?

  • Something got lost in translation, I guess...

  • Now's a good a time as ever to start wearing gloves i guess.
  • Second try of an old system... http://thedailywtf.com/Articles/Cracking-your-Fingers.aspx [thedailywtf.com]

  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday June 21, 2012 @01:55PM (#40402203)

    There are several problems with this technology most importantly how it will be used.

    #1.) Cops will use it like minority report. WOOO we know where you are

    #2.) This leads to number 2. Computers are not really used to perform fingerprint analysis. Yes, they can shorten the list but, in the end, its always a human who decides if its a "match"

    #3.) There is no standard protocol for deciding if two fingerprints match. It is completely subjective. The IAI has flat out said they won't create a protocol because its not possible

    #4.) There is no predictable margin of error. Frankly with no protocol and 100% subjective human interpretation, there is no way to quantify the probability of a match or more importantly, the margin of error.....heck, fingerprint analysts have been shown to make different identification to the same prints on different days and in different context.

    #4) fingerprint analysis operates on the assumption that all fingerprints are unique (or unique within a reasonable margin of error). There has never been any evidence to support this assumption. Even the FBI with probably the worlds largest fingerprint database has never published any data suggesting finger prints are unique.

    This all leads to the worst part. Law Enforcement will put this in an automated system to read our prints around town and assume its good enough to harass, arrest and convict citizens.

    I don't like where this is going.

    Dont get me wrong, its cool tech. Its just going to make a mess of things

    • by Hatta (162192)

      You forgot #5. The courts don't really care about #1-4, and will reject any challenges to fingerprint evidence.

    • by dublin (31215)

      Actually, it's always seemed to me that the biggest problem with fingerprint identification is that everyone leaves the silly things all over the place all the time - imagine a world where everything you touch is left with a copy of your house and car keys.

      Seriously, since we've have advanced cyanocacrylate-enhanced gummy bear fingerprint recovery and duplication technologies [slashdot.org] for over a decade now, why does anyone even *think* that fingerprints are a secure ID/auth method anymore?

      Unless we all actually do s

  • by Quiet_Desperation (858215) on Thursday June 21, 2012 @01:55PM (#40402207)

    ...but was unsure how he felt, hence the one glove.

    Hey, guys, scan this fingerprint. Yeah, the one on my middle finger, that's right.

    • by swillden (191260)

      ...but was unsure how he felt, hence the one glove.

      Hey, guys, scan this fingerprint. Yeah, the one on my middle finger, that's right.

      You have to turn it around. They can't scan your fingernail.

  • by kwiqsilver (585008) on Thursday June 21, 2012 @01:57PM (#40402233)

    After a little RTFA time, I don't think it's quite like the blurb makes it sound. The system can't scan dozens of people walking down a sidewalk (unlike the facial recognition technology used in most "free" countries today). The user has to actively wave at it to allow it to scan.

    One concern the article raised is that it appears the prints are stored on the machine as an image (or perhaps a series of numbers describing the layout) rather than a cryptographically secure hash of the print. So if you steal the system, you get a bunch of free pictures of people's prints...and you probably get all of the prints on the hand, since they would likely scan every digit and compare it to the database. As prints become a more common means of identification, those boxes become as valuable as credit card and SSN databases. Although I'm sure the security of 24-hour Fitness and Target are second to none.

  • by Karmashock (2415832) on Thursday June 21, 2012 @01:57PM (#40402239)

    If someone needs to lift finger prints from a subject it has traditionally meant that someone needs to get him to touch something. With this, a guy can walk behind you, take a few pictures without ever touching you, and have your finger prints printed out in rubber.

    Rather then giving us a better way to use finger prints... this means we have to go to retina scans.

    There has to be a better way.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      There has to be a better way.

      Rectal Scans

    • Its just a camera. Anyone can do this anyway with a good enough camera. Its not really news until they can use real-time image recognition to scan peoples finger prints as they walk down the street, like they do with car number plates.
  • No worries... (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Panaflex (13191) <convivialdingo.yahoo@com> on Thursday June 21, 2012 @02:25PM (#40402579)

    Nobody will every buy it. Except for government, fingerprint security is largely dead dead dead.

    First off, fingerprints can be replicated. Secondly, these types of optical systems have a (relatively) high failure rate (dust, smudges, adverse lighting conditions, etc). Next, they don't work with anyone under the age of 18 with reliability (the ridges and such vary considerably in size). Lastly - it freaks out the customers.

    Anyone that thinks fingerprint security is going to succeed in the market is delusional at best. Been there, spent millions, done that. No matter how good the system is or how safe the fingerprints are it just isn't going to be good enough for anything other than a door lock.

  • Great! Now I have to wear gloves whenever I'm in public. And I though wrapping my RFID cards in aluminum foil was bad!!!
  • Angular resolution (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Burb (620144) on Thursday June 21, 2012 @02:30PM (#40402641)

    Hang on, what about the angular resolution of visible light at 6m, with indents in surely being 0.1mm? Can we get high enough resolution Is that even possible? How fast must the picture be taken to avoid blurring?

    No, haven't RTFA. So sue me.

    • by ModelX (182441)

      Hang on, what about the angular resolution of visible light at 6m, with indents in surely being 0.1mm? Can we get high enough resolution Is that even possible? How fast must the picture be taken to avoid blurring?

      The resolution is doable. There's a tradeoff between speed and noise. What you can do is take many pictures, align them and take a sum to get rid of some noise. If my memory serves me the noise will go down with the square root of the number of pictures. Or just pump up the light in say infrared spectrum, if you have 10 times illumination you can cut the exposition time to 1/10 and get about the same quality.

    • This is my feeling as well. This is surely _NOT_ fingerprint imaging as they would have you believe. My quickie calculations say a 0.1mm ridge is about 3.5 arcseconds wide at a 6m distance. And that's if you assume perfect edges and a static finger. This is likely some pattern recognition on the shape, size, and orientation of the parts of your finger. Tip radius, length to knuckle, width, etc. Sounds like typical misleading marketspeak to me.
  • Let's compare it to similar technology like, I don't know, touch fingerprint readers that have a misread ratio of like 25%+. Considering that, there's this even more cutting edge new startup called any hardware store anywhere that lets you painlessly remove your fingerprints with proprietary technology known as sand paper. You'd look less suspicious than someone with gloves and it'd just come up as a misread or fail to read. Maybe 100 years from now you'd be a 1 in 1000 that gets a "OMG NO FINGERPRINTZ!"
  • I'm quite happy with my finger prints saying about 3ft away in a rather handy position. They'd be a bit hard to control at twice the distance.
  • I wonder if the thing can read fingerprints through a pair of leathers... I THINK NOT!

  • heh, heh...

    Then there's the idea of wearing someone else's fingerprints on your fingers, like James Bond in Diamonds Are Forever. How long after this long-range reading technology comes out before some enterprising criminal starts selling other people's fingerprints already built in to some sort of finger covers?

    Seriously, this sort of thing should be made illegal - even for cops.

    OTOH, it seems to me you'd have to approach someone from the rear because when most people walk, their hands are facing to the RE

    • On the bright side, we could leave fingerprint proof that Rush Limbaugh visited hundreds of Head Shops and gay bars across the country.
  • At least according to this recent frontline episode all most all forensic science is bunk
    http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/real-csi/

  • A password you cannot change but can read out 6 meters away without the victim knowing, isn't a good idea. Fingerprints are useless for security and this project simply proves that. You can do, at most, identification, but not authentication.

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