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FBI Executes Nationwide Raid of Anonymous Members 343

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the roflcopter-ride-to-prison dept.
Nominei and suraj.sun write in with news about a nationwide raid of Anonymous members. CBS reports that raids occurred in California, New Jersey, Florida, and New York. At least 12 arrests were made with 15 warrants executed. Surely this has nothing at all to do with their recent infiltration of a certain company.
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FBI Executes Nationwide Raid of Anonymous Members

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  • How about no (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @01:44PM (#36814508)

    Surely this has nothing at all to do with their recent infiltration of a certain company.

    I doubt there was 12 hackers working on it or that they would had busted them all within 24 hours. How about it's all the other bullshit "Anonymous" has been causing within one year, like the countless amount of DDoS against various companies and governments.

    • word! (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Presto Vivace (882157) <marshall@prestovivace.biz> on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @01:51PM (#36814600) Homepage Journal
      did anyone NOT see this coming?
      • Re:word! (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Ruke (857276) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @01:53PM (#36814626)
        I really don't think so. Love 'em, hate 'em, whatever, but no one was kidding themselves into thinking that the feds wouldn't be tracking Anonymous/LulzSec down.
        • I heard some tinfoil hat types suggesting that lulzsec was actually fascist law enforcement types providing cover for legislation giving them more power to combat "cyberterrorism". They might be temporarily surprised, though they'll quickly rationalize that law enforcement just needed some fall guys.
          • by gnick (1211984)

            I think going tin foil and yelling "Black Flag!" is going overboard, but you can bet that the feds had (have) members at core levels. Probably a mix of traditional undercover and turn-coats taken in unannounced arrests. I'm sure the same can be said about most widespread underground groups that give the feds the heebie-jeebies. And, frankly, I don't really have a problem with that.

            • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

              by interkin3tic (1469267)
              Except that you can't bet on it. You can never disprove these conspiracy theories and they're rarely proven. What makes you so sure the feds are at the "core" levels? They're probably on 4chan, undoubtedly were following lulzsec on twitter (they had a twitter feed going, right?), and maybe listening in on IRC, and maybe that constitutes "the core," but whether they've turned any of the real brains behind it? No idea how likely that is.
          • by the_raptor (652941) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @02:24PM (#36814988)

            Conspiracy theorists are impossible to argue with. No matter what evidence you show to the kooks they will just rationalise it away. Conspiracy theory derives from an inability to accept the chaotic nature of reality, that "random" events outside the control of any central power can utterly destroy someone's life. The belief in conspiracy theory is a belief that SOMETHING is actually in control: THE GOVERNMENT!

            And if THE GOVERNMENT could just have its secrets revealed, or if it was destroyed, then all would be right with the world and peace and justice would reign.

            • by causality (777677) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @02:54PM (#36815322)

              Conspiracy theorists are impossible to argue with. No matter what evidence you show to the kooks they will just rationalise it away. Conspiracy theory derives from an inability to accept the chaotic nature of reality, that "random" events outside the control of any central power can utterly destroy someone's life. The belief in conspiracy theory is a belief that SOMETHING is actually in control: THE GOVERNMENT!

              And if THE GOVERNMENT could just have its secrets revealed, or if it was destroyed, then all would be right with the world and peace and justice would reign.

              The problem with all of this, what fuels the conspiracy theories, is that false-flag operations really do happen. The various governments destroy their own credibility by engaging in such things.

            • Conspiracy theorists are impossible to argue with. No matter what evidence you show to the kooks they will just rationalise it away

              You might say the same thing about people who make the blanket assumption that governments, corporations, and other organizations are all completely open and transparent, only operating in the light of day, and completely without hidden agendas of any kind. But that seems at least as idiotic, doesn't it? Maybe even more so, since it requires nothing but blind trust and not the minimal considerations of motivation and plausible strategy that even the kookiest conspiracy theorist has to ponder.

              Sure, there are

            • by guanxi (216397) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @05:40PM (#36817084)

              Conspiracy theorists are impossible to argue with. No matter what evidence you show to the kooks they will just rationalise it away. Conspiracy theory derives from an inability to accept the chaotic nature of reality, that "random" events outside the control of any central power can utterly destroy someone's life. The belief in conspiracy theory is a belief that SOMETHING is actually in control: THE GOVERNMENT!

              And if THE GOVERNMENT could just have its secrets revealed, or if it was destroyed, then all would be right with the world and peace and justice would reign.

              In fairness, it's not just theory. There is ample evidence that News Corp conspired with Scotland Yard. It's not inconceivable that the FBI has a similar relationship with them, but there would need to be evidence.

          • by NevarMore (248971)

            I heard some tinfoil hat types suggesting that lulzsec was actually fascist law enforcement types providing cover for legislation giving them more power to combat "cyberterrorism". They might be temporarily surprised, though they'll quickly rationalize that law enforcement just needed some fall guys.

            Its not that far out there given recent events at the ATF and DoJ: http://news.google.com/news/search?&q=fast+furious+atf [google.com]

          • by blair1q (305137)

            But if the cyberterrorism is all coming from the police, giving them power to stop cyberterrorism will just stop the police from committing cyberterrorism.

            Score one for abatement of the police state.

        • by McFortner (881162)
          Karma is a real bitch sometimes.
      • Re:word! (Score:4, Funny)

        by Mike Buddha (10734) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @06:46PM (#36817528)

        did anyone NOT see this coming?

        I can think of 12 people who didn't...

    • by elrous0 (869638) *

      And I hear some of them were actual attacks and not just counterintelligence operations to discredit them.

  • by gubers33 (1302099) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @01:45PM (#36814516)
    Until they released all the News Corp. information and emails? Seems like someone might be a little worried that they are in the bribe list.
    • by ElectricTurtle (1171201) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @01:53PM (#36814616)
      I would be surprised if these raids stopped that release. In fact I'll bet most of these guys raided are just dumb script kiddies who front in IRC, or ordinary people who have helped with LOIC and similar ops, and/or people who have had their systems compromised are being used a proxies/bots by real Anon/Lulz people.

      That they are even tangentially related gives the feds an opportunity to make big headlines about raids to show that they are 'doing something' (TM) and they aren't incompetent and/or impotent by skill or distance/jurisdiction respectively.
      • by Lumpy (12016) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @02:06PM (#36814788) Homepage

        Bingo!

        Dumb little fake anarchist kiddies that wear trenchcoats... I wanna be a part of the revolution... Ohh I can download this app and be a part of it! SCHWEET!!!!

        Thanks for installing trojan-zombie 3.42r7 Dimitri in Slanovia now uses your computer.

        • The members of Anonymous are risking going to jail in order to reveal corruption in the government and corporations. You are saying these people are dumb for taking a risk to stand up for something they believe in. It's not dumb, it's courageous.
      • by blair1q (305137)

        You're presuming that the FBI's l33t-squad doesn't know the difference between a proxy and an active participant.

    • They only got 12 people. I'm sure there's people who can still release it.

      They're probably going to come down on the FBI next.

    • by Ruke (857276)
      These guys getting tracked down was pretty much inevitable; much as the releases are going to be. There is no way that they managed to nab everyone, and there's no way that one guy has the only copy of all of the information sitting physically in his house.
      • by Riceballsan (816702) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @02:06PM (#36814790)
        *some guys getting tracked down*, knowing history of anon my money would say the people caught are more likely then not just idiots that booted up LOIC, odds are the ones that did any actual skilled work and actually captured any information on any group, are unidentified. That is always how anon has worked, throw out a huge mob of random people to the front lines, handful of actual skilled people sneak in the back door. The random mob is expendable, and yes there will be more of them when they get picked off.
        • by tsotha (720379) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @02:28PM (#36815028)

          Maybe so, but just like low-level drug gang soldiers, these people are going to be very, very helpful as they contemplate long prison sentences. Eventually the trail will lead to the people who matter. Most people don't realize it, but financial and computer crimes carry pretty hefty penalties. Some of these people are thinking "Oh, hacking ${evil_corporation_or_government_organization} sounds like fun. Even if I get caught, they'll probably give me probation." Yeah... probation after you finish your 20 year sentence. If you were going to risk this kind of time you would have been better off robbing a bank.

          • by SethJohnson (112166) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @03:44PM (#36815940) Homepage Journal
            Reading your comment here, it is clear that you haven't wasted the time to research the philosophy / structure of the anonymous group. Which is a perfectly fine way to go about your life. You haven't missed out on much.

            But to clarify the expected result of this raid, I thought it might be valuable for those unfamiliar with Anonymous to know that the group is entirely anonymous, even among members. The people who were captured would probably love to roll on others in order to avoid jail time. That is not a choice for them, however. This makes it an attractive mob to manipulate.

            The feds will relish a day or two capturing headlines, pretending that "something" has been done to curtail these nefarious hackers. It's exactly as theatrical as the war on terror. At most they'll charge these individuals with possession of child pornography, as their browser cache is undoubtedly filled with thumbnails of illegal content inadvertently picked up while trawling 4chan. It's quite doubtful the FBI has captured anyone of significance.

            Seth
        • by blair1q (305137)

          Until background sneaker makes the mistake of recruiting an FBI agent to be his front-line troll.

  • Round 2 of The World Will Never Be The Same Again game has begun!

    "In a Post Anonymous World, you will need a passport stamp for every bit you download."

    • Re:Here we go! (Score:5, Insightful)

      by airfoobar (1853132) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @01:58PM (#36814696)
      Are you kidding? This is PROOF that current laws are more than enough for law enforcement to track down and arrest hackers.
      • You think the government and its agencies will see it that way? I wish I had your kind of optimism.
        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by chaboud (231590)

          "One day I will have your kind of optimism. Hey! That's today!"

          You can start and finish down that road all at once.

        • No, they are the last people I'd expect to admit that. I'm talking about public opinion, which I'm sure the former would be willing to manipulate to get their internet surveillance.
        • Contact your representatives and tell them that "current laws are more than enough for law enforcement to track down and arrest hackers." You know more about technology than your politicians do (probably) so be an informed and active citizen and let them know your thoughts about the matter. Get some of your friends and neighbors to do the same thing. Then, when the issue comes up they might just listen to what you said.
  • Wow, I know this is obligatory at this point, but they still don't get it.
  • by LWATCDR (28044) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @01:49PM (#36814566) Homepage Journal

    You have to wonder just how many people are going to have to be arrested until the grunts get the picture and bail.
    Anon "We are a Hydra chop off a head and two grows back" == You are expendable. Grunts are cheap and made by unskilled labor.
    AKA it sucks for you if you are the head that gets chopped off.

    • I suspect that it depends on what happens to them. Only the arrests, and the occasional fairly high-profile sentencings, make news.

      If many of the arrests turn out to be made in error and quietly dropped, that would create a greater apparent than real risk. Similarly, if many of the grunts are vaguely disgruntled minors whose parents are glad that they aren't out on the street getting into real trouble, the legal repercussions might be fairly slight and sealed at majority.

      I'm not following the matter c
      • by LWATCDR (28044)

        As long as they are under 18 you are right. Over 18 and even an arrest looks bad on your record. A slap on the wrist and a few weeks jail time can mean you don't get a lot of jobs. Of course they will not get anyone and the very young and very stupid think it could never happen to them.
        Like Anon says "They are expendable" so rush that machine gun nest it will not get all of you.

    • by ElectricTurtle (1171201) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @02:07PM (#36814802)
      How many people executed did it take before the various resistance movements in the Second World War gave up? Why are there still dissidents in China, Cuba, Iran, etc. when they keep being imprisoned?

      If you really believe in a cause it doesn't matter how many "examples" are made, in fact as Syria is finding out, the more "examples" you make the more martyrs the people have to avenge.

      While the stakes of Anon as a political movement are not as high as the suppression of dissidents in totalitarian states, Anon has become undeniably a political movement, and there are idealists willing to sacrifice themselves for political ends born every minute. Let me tell you something as a former young idealist: it isn't real until it happens to you. You imagine that the purity of your principles makes you invincible until the establishment turns its gaze on you and actually does something.

      However once an idea gains enough momentum and there enough people involved, actually acting against them becomes politically more difficult in Western democracies generally. At a certain threshold law breaking becomes civil disobedience, and if you end up fighting masses of people in the streets you've already lost. It will be only a few election cycles before those chickens come home to roost.

      I'm not saying this is necessarily going to happen, but I do challenge your interpretation of the situation as overly simplistic and in denial of historical scenarios of similar sociological pressures.
      • by ScentCone (795499) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @02:34PM (#36815068)
        You are making the fundamental mistake of assuming that bored teenage fashionista script kiddies represent, or are even able to meaningfully describe any sort of "cause" other than "it's cool to be part of a group that causes some shit to happen that makes it on the news."

        There's no there there. It's not a political movement, except for the possibility of the idiots who have been arrested being classical "useful idiots" in the service of someone else who has preyed upon their boring existence and broadband connection to use them as weak-willed meatbots who make the mistake of thinking they're being cool. You are way over analyzing things. It really is for the lulz, as it turns out. These are just your basic punks. Vandals who think they're impacting The Man, or at least say so, because that babelicious Goth girl in their algebra class seems to nod her head when she hears tales of angsty rebellion from nerds using Mom's FiOS pipe as meat puppets for lefty activists.
        • by ElectricTurtle (1171201) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @02:46PM (#36815230)
          When you look at the targets like Arizona law enforcement, and the reasons including specifically retribution for Arizona Senate Bill 1070, and say it's not a political movement, I have to question the rationale of your perspective. Just because you don't like it or don't agree with it and want to malign or dismiss those who are part of it does not negate objective facts about acts and actors.

          Political Targets + Political Reasons = Political Movement, like it or not.
          • by ScentCone (795499)

            Political Targets + Political Reasons = Political Movement, like it or not.

            That's where you're wrong. It's "High Profile In-The-News Targets + Desperate Personal Need To Seem Dangerous And Cool = Oldest Story In The Book"

            • Yes because you know everybody involved so intimately. It is a prima facie political movement at the barest minimum.
      • This is the most insightful post I've seen all day... as the quote goes, "He who does not remember history is doomed to repeat it."

    • Yet, thousands die in wars all the time. All the grunts there know they're expendable too.

  • by girlintraining (1395911) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @01:49PM (#36814568)
    Having solved all other problems, FBI agents today busted down the doors of supersized geeks with cheeto-stained fingers living in their mother's basements. A spokesperson said "these 'hacker' types represent the single biggest threat to the american way of life, and must be stopped." Elsewhere in America infrastructure continued to crumble into dust, fall into rivers, or start on fire as unemployment continues to rise, many urban centers are now 3rd world status, and white-collar criminals are seen driving cars made out of hundred dollar bills and dead immigrants. The FBI insists that random vandalism of websites is a far worthier objective for them than catching terrorists, rich bastards who steal millions from retirement funds, and the occasional rapist.
    • To be fair, cars made of hundred dollar bills fall under the jurisdiction of the Treasury dept.

    • by mr1911 (1942298)
      Just remember, this is your government. You get what you vote for.
      • by MickyTheIdiot (1032226) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @02:04PM (#36814758) Homepage Journal

        The laws, however, are subject to the highest bidder....

      • by flaming error (1041742) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @02:05PM (#36814772) Journal

        > You get what you vote for.
        I wish that were true but sadly, I seem to keep getting what politicians' campaign sponsors want instead.

      • by Applekid (993327)

        Just remember, this is your government. You get what you vote for.

        Nah, you get what the ignorant stammering majority choosing between a turd and a douche, if they could even be arsed to waddle down to the polling place and take 5 minutes within a 12 hour window on a Tuesday out of fear the other guy might win.

        • by mattack2 (1165421)

          if they could even be arsed to waddle down to the polling place

          Good, I want them not to vote. That makes my vote effectively more important.

          (BTW, I often simply don't vote for anybody for many offices, especially local government. I vote on the issues I care about & know about.. and leave the others blank.)

      • by FoolishOwl (1698506) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @02:16PM (#36814900) Journal

        I keep voting for the candidates who promise not to murder any innocent people. They don't seem to win the elections, though -- not above the municipal level, anyway.

      • by macraig (621737)

        That's a moronic refrain, and you're a jackass for repeating it. The real truth of the matter is that we get what we DON'T vote for... meaning it's the intentions and behavior of which we AREN'T told before the election that we actually get in the end.

        The problem, of course, is that we have virtually no useful criteria whatsoever to identify the unethical self-interested bastards before they take office. Even mr1911, who smugly implies that he's never ever voted for a rotten candidate himself, has no frea

        • by mr1911 (1942298)
          Such hostility. At least we know one person that believed the whole "hope and change" crap.
          • by macraig (621737)

            Exactly how do you know that? The same way you know to avoid *ever* voting for a candidate that works against the public good? Yeah, you're quite the authority on everything, aren't you?

      • by MrSenile (759314)

        Except by the time we are allowed to vote for them, it's a choice between fast painful death, or a painful fast death. Maybe a death that is fast and painful? Hey, how about a death that is painful and fast.

        Sure, it may look like redundancy the way I wrote it, but they're still considered 'democrats', 'republicans', and so forth.

        The idiom was intentional.

        When every single political figurehead is corrupted in one form or another, with very few, if any exceptions, it frankly doesn't matter who you pick. Wh

    • by Kenja (541830)
      I would rather they enforce the laws I dont agree with in the hopes that doing so will draw attention to them and promote change then to have the law enforcement officials decide which laws they should and should not enforce.
    • by YodasEvilTwin (2014446) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @02:01PM (#36814734) Homepage
      I remember when white-collar criminals still shared a sense of national identity. A true patriot would drive a car made out of hundred dollar bills and middle-class American taxpayers.
  • by cmholm (69081) <.cmholm. .at. .mauiholm.org.> on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @01:50PM (#36814584) Homepage Journal

    Anonymous has been hacking into enough of the right kind of computers that it was a given they were going to get Federal attention. It takes a while to pull together a coordinated series of raids, so it's extremely unlikely the Sun (newspaper) exploit had any bearing on these arrests.

    • by jonbryce (703250)

      In the UK, the police wait nearby and move in to conduct the raid while they are in the middle of the act, so they have evidence it was them, and not a trojan or an insecure wifi router that did it; so it is quite possible that thesun.co.uk exploit was the trigger for them to move in on their pre-planned raid.

  • by GameboyRMH (1153867) <gameboyrmh@gmaiWELTYl.com minus author> on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @01:53PM (#36814630) Journal

    Anonymous member = IRC server owner who may not have anything to do with Anonymous

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by rsmith-mac (639075)

      Some people may find this strange, but society generally doesn't like it if you harbor criminals. Hopefully the FBI has the brains to realize the IRC owners are not always the hackers, but that doesn't mean that the IRC owners are in the clear.

      • by medv4380 (1604309)
        The IRC server owners probably long ago put in the software taps to record the information for the FBI so they could execute today's raids.
  • One problem with TFA (Score:4, Interesting)

    by sl4shd0rk (755837) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @01:58PM (#36814700)

    "..Fox News was reporting.." I would disregard that portion of the article pending a reliable source of information.

                   

  • 21st century Pinkertons.
    • by ScentCone (795499)

      FBI ... 21st century Pinkertons.

      You've got it precisely backwards. It's Anonymous that fancies themselves the self-described law and who are deployed by interested parties to interfere with someone else's daily lives. It's angry lefties that egg Anonymous on to virtually lynch people with whom they disagree. Get it straight. The FBI are the historical marshals or the military, and Anonymous/Lulzsec are playing the role of self-appointed posse/executioners doing the bidding of their idealogical masters. They get paid in the currency they

  • Sarcasm from the article summary:

    Surely this has nothing at all to do with their recent infiltration of a certain company.

    One of the reasons I've respected Anonymous is because not only do they do what everyone else cannot, but they get away without leaving tracks.

    When HBGary claimed to have tracked them down and threatened to release their identities, they broke into HBGary, discovered that the information was faulty, and released it themselves.

    So, no one can beat Anonymous at their own game, except for...

  • The timing of this is interesting. Are they hoping to take away heat from poor old Rupert?
  • and a lot more concerned about the former army head that's now the head of the intelligence secret police. If any other country made that kind of link, we'd be questioning their position on civil rights....
  • Just GTFO (Score:3, Informative)

    by unity100 (970058) on Tuesday July 19, 2011 @03:08PM (#36815472) Homepage Journal
    there is no way in hell that arrests et al can do anything to anonymous.

    you arrest 100 people in usa. you arrest 100 people in france. you arrest 100 people in germany.

    what about the millions in china, russia, india ? how are you going to 'arrest' or 'scare' them ? morons.

    this is no more than a publicity stunt to satiate the bastard that is murdoch, since his ass is on the line now. and fbi and other government organizations in u.s. are making evident who they are serving. they didnt conduct a nationwide raid when all kinds of govt. organizations were attacked by anon.

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