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Hacker Group LulzSec Challenges FBI 308

Posted by Soulskill
from the getting-down-to-business dept.
Tiek00n writes "Hacker Group 'LulzSec' has gained some attention recently for their hacks of PBS and Sony. Their most recent target: FBI affiliate Infragard. The group claims, 'It has come to our unfortunate attention that NATO and our good friend Barrack Osama-Llama 24th-century Obama have recently upped the stakes with regard to hacking. They now treat hacking as an act of war. So, we just hacked an FBI affiliated website (Infragard, specifically the Atlanta chapter) and leaked its user base. We also took complete control over the site and defaced it...'"
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Hacker Group LulzSec Challenges FBI

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  • Haha (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward

    Well done LulzSec. Exposing the hypocrisy in the US government... condemning hacking while funding it themselves.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by MacTO (1161105)

      How is that hypocrisy? If you define hacking as an attack on military or civilian infrastructure, then you're playing with the big boys. And those big boys get to define it as anything from a teenaged prank to a full out declaration of war -- based upon who attacked and what the consequences of those actions are. In a lot of respects it's no different than launching an assault by good old fashioned physical means.

      So if you're treating this as a joke, grow up. These are real actions with real consequence

      • >So if you're treating this as a joke, grow up. These are real actions with real consequences.

        So you're one of those neighbors who'd sell out the guy next door if he stood up to the governments corruption. I see.... Revolution Action has to start somewhere and if its someone using their skill to do it and making others take notice so be it.

        • Re:Haha (Score:4, Insightful)

          by Original Replica (908688) on Saturday June 04, 2011 @01:37PM (#36337394) Journal
          Sadly the service that LulzSec is providing is that of: "Now Feds have reason for totalitarian internet laws and broad ISP log searches."
      • Attacking the utility infrastructure versus defacing an FBI website and rooting their server without causing any significant harm are 2 very different crimes. Considering the effect the lulzsec group is having on security awareness, it could even be considered a good thing. These guys are operating for the most part transparently, they aren't hacking the servers and keeping it secret to use against the targets. Yes, it's an embarrassingly public data breach, but after compromising the infrastructure, they

      • As far as I can tell they haven't said, or done, "We are going to go around hacking anyone we want and nobody can do anything about it. However if you hack us we'll bomb you!" What they've said is "An attack on US infrastructure by a foreign power is an act or war, and it really doesn't matter what form that attack takes."

        That is a position quite consistent with US history and law, and internationally too. It isn't like there is only a well defined set of things that can qualify as an act of war and if you

    • Prepare to see your Interwebs go on 24/7 lockdown.

      Time to set up that VPN on a foreign VPS that you always wanted.

      • by lxs (131946)

        Maybe we can get a global VPN exchange project off the ground. You guys get freedom and we get Hulu.

      • I'll reply to you.

        We can't even tell if this is a False Flag or some semi-well-intentioned young hacker group.

        The Govt is playing a pretty good chess game "establishing the pre-requisites of tyranny". Of course they have some logical fallacies built in, that's why Division by Zero is illegal in math - you then enter fantasy land.

        I am only one of many who saw this coming, but all I can do is educate and hope someone with some clout notices.

  • FBI? Puh-leaze.

    Hack Section 31 and then I'd be impressed.

  • Clever (Score:3, Interesting)

    by asto21 (1797450) on Saturday June 04, 2011 @08:22AM (#36336700)
    Take a site down first and then make sure it stays down by slashdotting it.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday June 04, 2011 @08:22AM (#36336702)

    Or is Slashdot slashdotted? These 503 errors have been happening for a couple of days now.

  • Act of war. (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday June 04, 2011 @08:23AM (#36336704)

    So it's clear from the emails leaked that the US of A just started a war with Libya.

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      What do you mean, "started"? USA has been bombing Libya for weeks already.

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward

        What do you mean, "started"? USA has been bombing Libya for weeks already.

        You don't honestly expect slashbots to be aware of what's happening in the world around them, do you? And besides, as everyone knows, they're NEVER wrong...

  • Clear acts of War (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Khyber (864651) <techkitsune@gmail.com> on Saturday June 04, 2011 @08:34AM (#36336740) Homepage Journal

    I wonder if the people of the USA have any legal recourse to arrest our own government for illegal acts of war since the evidence is out in the open, not to mention violating human rights by attempting to maintain slave labor conditions (The recent Levi Strauss/Haiti revelation) for profit.

    Oh, and shall we drop on charges of illegal renditions of other countries leaders (how do you think Haiti happened?)

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by erroneus (253617)

      There are measures which can lead to a recall of government leaders. Problem is, you need to organize and the moment you do, somehow you end up on no-fly and other lists and if you wish to "legally" assemble into a group, you have to ask permission.

    • Re:Clear acts of War (Score:5, Informative)

      by Warmlight (1315819) on Saturday June 04, 2011 @09:31AM (#36336954)
      It's not law but the Declaration of Independence says:

      ...that whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness. Prudence....

      Again, it's not law but it is one of the documents on which our country is based.

      • by Fjandr (66656)

        And people pay it only lip service, much as people pay the Constitution (which is the law of the land) only lip service.

        With recent rulings on the 4th Amendment, and previous rulings that evidence illegally obtained is admissible as long as the police can manufacture a reasonable excuse why they thought it wasn't illegal, there is no more rule of law. It's rule of "what can I get away with next?" The 9th and 10th Amendments gasped their last breath when Lincoln came to power. About the only reversal that's

  • Amusing signature (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday June 04, 2011 @08:44AM (#36336784)

    "Now we are all sons of bitches , Lulz Security". I approve of the Manhattan project reference.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday June 04, 2011 @08:50AM (#36336802)

    We see with Apple and Google phones tracking people, SSD not being securely erased, police with gadgets that rip all data off cell phones, back doors in routers, NSA rooms on the AT&T backbone servers, printers with secret yellow codes, carriers recording GPS coordinates 8 times a hour, TOMTOM and ONStar snitching the list goes on and on... We see EXACTLY what the jack booted government thugs are making the industry do with products we need to use, grossly invading the rights of everyone in the process and under the guise of trying to catch a few bad guys. Enough is ENOUGH!

    • by Bloodwine77 (913355) on Saturday June 04, 2011 @09:36AM (#36336982)

      Don't put that all on the shoulders of the government. The corporations want all of our information and metrics as well, so that they can better tailor their advertising, marketing, and sales. Not to mention that information is very, very valuable and people need to realize that in many cases we're the products being sold. Our information is the product.

      • by TubeSteak (669689) on Saturday June 04, 2011 @01:10PM (#36337266) Journal

        Don't put that all on the shoulders of the government. The corporations want all of our information and metrics as well, so that they can better tailor their advertising, marketing, and sales.

        The government, under sealed subpoenas, requests that information from the corporations.
        Then argues in court that if those dockets were unsealed, the corporations might feel pressure to resist government requests for information.

        So, while the corporations aren't entirely blameless for giving up the goods without a fight, the government is actively aggressing against its people and refusing us the ability to fight back.

      • by hvm2hvm (1208954)

        so that they can better tailor their advertising, marketing, and sales

        That's the bullshit they tell us to make it seem harmless but they want power just the same the government wants it. I'm pretty sure, the big companies are doing more with the information than just marketing.

    • by EdZ (755139)

      SSD not being securely erased

      Unless you use an OS that sends the TRIM command, or have an SSD that does garbage collection (read: didn't cheap out and buy something with a JMicron controller), you're data is so securely erased that no recovery company not lying through it's teeth will claim to be able to get it back. Hell, just getting data out of an SSD with just FAT corruption is a huge chore, and almost impossible with some controllers (especially for files much larger than the block size).
      It's one of those "Everyone Knows" things,

  • Just a bully (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Prosthetic_Lips (971097) on Saturday June 04, 2011 @08:52AM (#36336814) Homepage

    LulzSec just showed their hand that they are operating like a schoolyard bully. "Do what we want / act like we want, or we'll hack you."

    You might think they are standing up to a bully (USA), but taking down 3 different Sony companies smells of a bully, kicking them while they are down.

    • Re:Just a bully (Score:4, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward on Saturday June 04, 2011 @09:03AM (#36336858)
      Well of course. That's what these groups do (LulzSec, Anonymous, etc.). They aren't heroic crusaders against "the man". They are immature idiots who happen to know how to use hacking tools (and I'm sure some of them are experts). It doesn't make them people to admire or emulate. Hopefully these tools will get caught.
      • Well, I think they are heroic crusaders and I do admire them. But then again I always like Robin Hood too.
      • by 1s44c (552956)

        Well of course. That's what these groups do (LulzSec, Anonymous, etc.). They aren't heroic crusaders against "the man". They are immature idiots who happen to know how to use hacking tools (and I'm sure some of them are experts). It doesn't make them people to admire or emulate. Hopefully these tools will get caught.

        Yes, because once these idiots are locked up we can feel safe as only proper criminals will steal our personal data from careless multinationals.

        The real problem is that multinationals and governments care about compliance with dumb regulations and not about security. They therefore suck big time at security.

      • They are immature idiots who happen to know how to use hacking tools (and I'm sure some of them are experts). It doesn't make them people to admire or emulate.

        I admire them. Let's hope that guys like you will never have reasons to admire them. (If they do their job right, you will never admire them. Let's cross thumbs it stays that way.)

    • Re:Just a bully (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Elbereth (58257) on Saturday June 04, 2011 @09:31AM (#36336962) Journal

      Worse than that, I'd contend that the intention is not to embarrass Sony, but rather to attack Sony's customers. I hate to use the T word, but this clearly is dictionary-definition terrorism: attacking a soft target in order to bully them into falling in line with your demands. Sony's customers are seen as the enemy, as much as Sony itself is, because they provide positive reinforcement to Sony (in the form of revenue), while breaking any attempts to boycott Sony. By adding a negative consequence to being Sony's customer (privacy invasions), they hope to influence the customers' actions.

      Obviously, they're not setting off bombs in crowded cities or crashing planes into skyscrapers. They're just a bunch of stupid kids inconveniencing people. That doesn't change what word the dictionary uses to define such actions, however...

      Admittedly, I've spent so many years trolling Slashdot, it's difficult for me to switch out of "troll" mode and make a legitimate point without resorting to any trolling, but this time, I'm honestly just sayin'. And, that, kids is the danger of a lifetime of trolling: eventually you can't even tell when you're trolling or not.

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward

        I hate to use the T word, but this clearly is dictionary-definition terrorism: attacking a soft target in order to bully them into falling in line with your demands.

        What is the reported damage to Sony customers? So what if their account details are posted? Every credit union, every other large company that they do business with, every government agency that they've ever interacted with on a federal, state, and local level, every intelligence agency that vacuums up mind-boggling amounts of internet data a da

      • "Obviously, they're not setting off bombs in crowded cities or crashing planes into skyscrapers. They're just a bunch of stupid kids inconveniencing people. That doesn't change what word the dictionary uses to define such actions, however..."

        Yes it does, and that's an absolute epic failure on your part for not understanding that. Perhaps you don't understand the definition of "terror?"

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      You're right, they are bullying Sony. However, as some might attest, once someone stands up to the bully, the bully generally chills out, or shows its true colors. Sony was a bully initially-- and hackers have reduced them. Sony, however, has not and will not learn the error of its ways. Call it my opinion, but if, after the first attack, Sony got all its network and use back, do you really think they'd change? Based on what we've seen in the past, they'd become only more draconian. Sony is more like a gang

    • by 1s44c (552956)

      LulzSec just showed their hand that they are operating like a schoolyard bully. "Do what we want / act like we want, or we'll hack you."

      You might think they are standing up to a bully (USA), but taking down 3 different Sony companies smells of a bully, kicking them while they are down.

      Organizations that don't protect against SQL injection or don't use decent authentication are going to get cracked by someone sooner or later. Lulzsec may be publicly embarrassing various groups but they don't seem to be involved in any crime above and beyond that. You call them bullies but what if credit card scammers got hold of Sony's data and quietly started robbing everyone involved? The situation would be way more messy.

    • Re:Just a bully (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Dhalka226 (559740) on Saturday June 04, 2011 @01:02PM (#36337214)

      Yaknow, a lot of people can--and did--defend the Sony hacks. Some could probably defend the "FBI" hack, though when I hear words like "FBI-affiliated" I just cringe at what they're hiding behind that term.

      But how do you defend hacking PBS? These people are obviously just scumbags with too much time on their hands, and articles like this are exactly what they want. Ignore them. They're not worth the attention.

    • Re:Just a bully (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Idbar (1034346) on Saturday June 04, 2011 @01:14PM (#36337286)
      For what is worth. As I recall correctly from my youth, in a battle between bullies, kicking them while they are down seems like a right approach. You shouldn't give them the chance to stand back up, because you know they will be really pissed.
      • by hajus (990255)

        Reminds me of Ender's Game.

        • by Raenex (947668)

          Me too. So you basically have to kill the bully or put him in a wheelchair when he's down, because even if you fuck him up real bad, he's gonna be pissed when he recovers.

    • taking down 3 different Sony companies smells of a bully, kicking them while they are down.

      In all fairness, sometimes Sony deserves a little down-kicking.

  • by Andy Smith (55346) on Saturday June 04, 2011 @09:41AM (#36337004) Homepage

    ...to find this all frickin' hilarious?

    Wildly entertaining as a spectator.

  • by alexam (1937588) on Saturday June 04, 2011 @09:47AM (#36337018)

    I mean, right?

    Let's say a citizen, or many citizens, are shot. If it's done by another US citizen, it's murder, a crime, and not an 'act of war.' If it's done by some organization, it's homebrew terrorism. If it's done by another country, it's an act of war. That doesn't seem like a wholly unreasonable stance to hold, although it certainly can be debated, I guess.

    I don't know, are these people going for the "That's a ridiculous stance on hacking, what are you gonna do, declare war on US?? How ludicrous! See, hacking is not an act of war" angle to this whole thing?

    If so.....lulz.

    • Well the US government managed to declare a war on terror which is essentially a war on its own citizens given how they've starting tracking them, invading their privacy, and essentially stripping them of any of their human rights (rights provided by the constitution or otherwise). So they've already got their internal war. Not much more for them to do there, all they've got left to do is the same thing for all other nations which they haven't done it to.

    • Uh, you mean hacking a computer is like shooting someone?

      Really?
  • by Zero1za (325740) on Saturday June 04, 2011 @09:48AM (#36337026)

    (and by well, I mean with prison sex).

  • by OnTheEdge (136784) on Saturday June 04, 2011 @09:53AM (#36337062)
    Funny how the ratio of Anonymous Coward comments to logged in user comments seems to have spiked on this thread.
  • Really, no salt? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by definate (876684) on Saturday June 04, 2011 @10:14AM (#36337124)

    So, they didn't even salt the md5 hashes. How lazy does this "security" firm want to be?

    Also, how simple do some of these passwords want to be? LOL "infragard26j" are you kidding me? Come on IBM, lift your game!

    Here's a copy of the exposed file on PasteBin [pastebin.com]

    I've noticed that the "cracking" method of choice was just "see if these are known values in public rainbow tables". Which, many of them were. Huzzah!

    Also, I thought that all md5's had been cracked before, however it seems not so. So, I decided to calculate how many gb such a table would AT LEAST have to be [wolframalpha.com]. Well, I was quite surprised. Unless there's collisions or my math is fucked, that's quite a lot!

    Seems Unveilance [unveillance.com], the company which had its CEO's private emails leaked, has responded and sort of, also authenticated the hack too. Unveillance Official Statement [unveillance.com]

    • by Seth024 (1241160)

      Your math is correct if you want to know how many entries it would take to cover the entire hash space.
      However more advanced tables don't store all entries. (rainbow tables)

      In short: they repeatedly hash a word and turn the hash into another word. After many of these iterations they store the word they started with and the word they end up with. If you want to look up a hash, repeatedly turn it into a word and hash it until you find a word that's in the table. They you can start off at the starting word of

  • I've always wondered how secure slashdot is. Let's do an experiment. Mod me up to +5 insightful, and see if LulzSec hacks /. to bring my post down.
    And for good measure: Assange should be in jail, child pornography is evil, and Ron Paul would make a terrible president. There, that should lure them out.
  • by Jerry (6400) on Saturday June 04, 2011 @01:59PM (#36337516)

    Are you positive that Lulz is not a government/theocratic cyber warfare unit operating out of Europe or the Mid-East or China or Cuba or Venezuela? In other words, people who have ponies in the race? How can you be sure?

    Or, is it your attitude that while the above mentioned countries can and do have cyber warfare units it is wrong for the USA to have its own unit too?

    One never reads about these "hackers" breaking into Russian or Chinese government websites and then releasing documents they steal. Why is that? Could it be that they know that they are not as "invisible" as they brag to be, and that if they did attack those sites it wouldn't be long before they were sleeping with the reporters whom Putin didn't like, or they'd suddenly wake up in a Chinese or Iranian prison?

    And, to the idiot who claimed that "hacking never hurt anyone", talk to the people who were put in harms way by WikiLeaks sloppy editing of stolen documents containing the names of people.

    The RICO and PATRIOT Acts, along with the TSA, have done enough damage to citizens of the USA without having hackers further the harm. It's time for rational people to replace the Rude-Goldberg security arrangements created by the DHS. But, let's imagine that Lulz and WikiLeaks are successful in creating a citizen uproar that results in the activities of USA espionage agencies being severely, although irrationally, curtailed. When those agencies can no longer prevent the smuggling of a disassembled Pakistani or Iranian nuclear bomb into the country and, say, Denver, CO disappears in a mushroom cloud, will you be happen then?

    • by TheCarp (96830)

      > And, to the idiot who claimed that "hacking never hurt anyone", talk to the people who were put in harms way by WikiLeaks sloppy editing
      > of stolen documents containing the names of people.

      To be fair though, wikileaks is about exposing conspiracy, not about protecting the good name, or even lives of the conspirators.

      Nobody was put in danger for anything that they didn't actually do. What about the lives ruined by the silence of the secret cables? What about the Tunisian and Egyption peoples who, onl

  • A Twitter contact pointed me to this article over at Jaded Security. There's something shady about this guy Karim Hijazi who allegedly was extorted.

    Who is to blame for the success of the latest round of attacks?
    http://jadedsecurity.net/2011/06/04/who-is-to-blame-for-the-success-of-the-latest-round-of-attacks/ [jadedsecurity.net]

  • Has anyone else noticed the army geospatial and a bunch of other army core sites have been down for days with the very same error message from a previous hacking episode in Janurary?

    I guess it is all fun and games until some resource you want to access is offline due to some stupid cracker.

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