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World IPv6 Day On June 8

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  • by Metabolife (961249) on Thursday June 02, 2011 @04:43PM (#36324694)

    Woot!

    • by R0UTE (807673)
      ::1 post is how I would have put it ;)
    • :) Hey, just keeping it real...
  • by bunratty (545641) on Thursday June 02, 2011 @04:46PM (#36324720)
    What users is Google notifying? Users of the Google website? Users of Google Chrome? I went to google.com using Firefox and Chrome and did not see any notification.
  • Instead of just turning on IPv6 for a day, the whole collective (300 of them) should "shut off" IPv4 with a warning page that says you need IPv6. That will get the ISPs' attention. Lets face it, my mother doesn't know or care about IPv6 or I pee V6 [engines].
    • by LordNimon (85072)

      The problem is that 99% of home routers can't handle IPv6, so it won't matter if the ISP supports it. This includes routers that claim to support IPv6 but have critical bugs that prevent it from working properly.

      • by Spad (470073)

        Not to mention Windows XP...

      • by dotgain (630123)
        Hrmph. Good thing I didn't skimp on the dollars and got myself a Cisco ADSL router. Oh, what's this? It doesn't support IPv6 either.
        • by Bert64 (520050)

          Cisco routers should support it, i have a 1701 and an 1801 both running ipv6 over adsl...
          Ofcourse you do need the correct IOS image.

      • by bknabe (1910854)

        The problem is that 99% of home routers can't handle IPv6, so it won't matter if the ISP supports it. This includes routers that claim to support IPv6 but have critical bugs that prevent it from working properly.

        Isn't IPv4 a subset of IPv6? So it shouldn't matter if my home router or modem is compatible, if the changeover is done properly. My ISP would do the equivalent of NAT routing with my IPv4 address being part of the IPv6 address the ISP sends out to the world.

        • Isn't IPv4 a subset of IPv6? So it shouldn't matter if my home router or modem is compatible, if the changeover is done properly. My ISP would do the equivalent of NAT routing with my IPv4 address being part of the IPv6 address the ISP sends out to the world.

          Nope - IPv6 and IPv4 are essentially two similar, but distinct, protocols. This is why the transition is not a trivial thing to do.

        • by Ricochet (16874)

          Dan is correct, at layer 2 the 802.3 frames are compatible but at layer 3 the packets are not compatible. Things like switches will generally pass IPv6 traffic with little or no trouble but routers and firewalls will ignore IPv6 traffic unless it support (and is configured for) IPv6.

      • This is what the problem has been for me. I WANT to switch our home network over to run off IPv6 primarily and IPv4 as the secondary protocol, but I have no idea what consumer routers support IPv6, or how good that support is. It appears that our current router, a Linksys WRT610N, may support IPv6, but if it does so everything about it is invisible to the router admin. (I say it may because my ISP is Comcast, and we live in the area where Comcast has rolled out their IPv6 solutions, and I am able to reac
        • I have no idea what consumer routers support IPv6

          Very roughly speaking, none.

          If you want to experiment with IPv6, I strongly recommend that you get yourself a router supported by OpenWRT [openwrt.org] and reflash it. This will also give you the ability to do all sorts of things that consumer routers usually don't do, such as traffic shaping [wikipedia.org], arbitrary subnetting, dynamic routing, or simply basic router functionality with fewer bugs.

          --jch

        • by rrp (537287)
          The Apple Airport Extreme supports IPv6 (It us under advanced). I also supports running a tunnel for those with an ISP that doesn't support IPv6.
        • by La Gris (531858)

          AVM FritzBox Fon 7270 with latest firmware 74.04.90 support IPv6 natively even with popular tunnel providers like SiXXS if your ISP does not provides IPv6.

        • by Cimexus (1355033)

          Consumer routers that I know of that support IPv6:

          - any mid-high end Billion (one of the most common brands in Asia/Pacific)
          - Apple Airport Extreme (not very common admittedly)
          - most AVN ones (very common in Europe)
          - anything flashable with OpenWRT or DD-WRT (this covers a lot of common North American ones) [not sure if this is native IPv6 or just brokered, but either way...]

          Last two routers I've owned have been a Billion 7404VNPX (a few years old but got IPv6 in a firmware update earlier this year) and a A

    • The primary point of the test is to determine if any significant number of users will have trouble reaching the sites via IPv4 when the sites return both A and AAAA records. If this can be shown not to be a problem there is no reason for all sites with IPv6 access (there are a lot of them) not to add AAAA records.

    • by Charlotte (16886)

      Wrong. This isn't intended for your mother. This is about ensuring that the entire chain of ISPs, web hosters, etc between you and these well-known sites is IPv6 ready.

      The fact is that the "real" internet backbone (the people who provide the connectivity to the people who provide your ISP's connectivity) has been IPv6 for a while now. They are ready. Many others aren't. This will allow everyone to test things. Last IPv6 day a large number of issues were successfully identified and corrected.

      Of course, ther

  • I got my 1.206 Septillion IPv6 addresses, who's with me?

  • I followed the link for the google test, the host name referenced returns this:

    % host ipv6test.google.com
    ipv6test.google.com is an alias for ipv6test.l.google.com.
    ipv6test.l.google.com has address 209.85.225.103
    ipv6test.l.google.com has address 209.85.225.104
    ipv6test.l.google.com has address 209.85.225.105
    ipv6test.l.google.com has address 209.85.225.106
    ipv6test.l.google.com has address 209.85.225.147
    ipv6test.l.google.com has address 209.85.225.99

    • by Spad (470073)

      As I posted above, it's to test that you, as an IPv4 user, can still connect to the site when it's being advertised via IPv4 *and* IPv6, not that you can connect to it via IPv6.

    • by Ferzerp (83619)

      That's because you're querying for A records and not AAAA.

      Use something like nslookup and set the type of query to AAAA.

      Non-authoritative answer:
      Name: ipv6.l.google.com
      Address: 2001:4860:800e::93
      Aliases: ipv6.google.com

      • by tftp (111690)

        Pinging 2001:4860:800e::93 with 32 bytes of data:
        PING: transmit failed, error code 1231.
        PING: transmit failed, error code 1231.
        PING: transmit failed, error code 1231.
        PING: transmit failed, error code 1231.

        Ping statistics for 2001:4860:800e::93:
        Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 0, Lost = 4 (100% loss)

        I wonder what exactly they are trying to achieve by this experiment. Even if someone asks for AAAA records and gets them, if the path is not configured all the way down to them not much is going to hap
        • by bahamat (187909)
          On 6/8 there will be both A and AAAA records for www.google.com. Almost all operating systems (that is, at least every one I've used over the past year) will prefer v6 over v4 if there is a functioning stack. And a functioning stack being defined as a globally unique address on at least one interface and a route to the intended destination, although some operating systems will prefer v4 over v6 if the only global address an automatic tunnel (6to4 or Toredo).

          If you only have v4 you will not be affected by v6
          • by tftp (111690)

            And a functioning stack being defined as a globally unique address on at least one interface and a route to the intended destination, although some operating systems will prefer v4 over v6 if the only global address an automatic tunnel (6to4 or Toredo).

            Yes, I remembered something like that, and I double-checked now and it is true. If IPv4 link works then the tunnel won't be activated.

            As I mentioned, I just use some hardcoded IPv6 addresses (2001:db8:290c:1291::4 on this box, to be changed to a routable

        • I wonder what exactly they are trying to achieve by this experiment

          The purpose of the experiment is to see what problems actually appear.

          If there is a fallback to IPv4 then it there be just a delay.

          I expect Google know this - they recently implemented happy eyeballs [ietf.org] in Chrome, and I believe similar functionality is also in Safari.

          How will Google know about any of that?

          See IPv6 in Google - A Case Study (PDF) [ipv6tf.org] for an idea as to what Google are already measuring, and how.

          • > and I believe similar functionality is also in Safari.

            Wrong.

          • I expect Google know this - they recently implemented happy eyeballs [ietf.org] in Chrome

            FINALLY the powers that be are waking up to the fact that using the standard OS connect timeout as a fallback timeout for interactive applications is a STUPID idea. Their failure to realise this obvious issue years ago has lead to the default advice for weird network slowness in many situations to be "try disabling IPv6"!

        • by davew (820)

          The object of the exercise is to discover the endpoints where failover does not properly occur and get them fixed. [getipv6.info]

          If you'd prefer to avoid a nasty surprise on the day, there are ways to test in advance [ripe.net].

        • Even if someone asks for AAAA records and gets them, if the path is not configured all the way down to them not much is going to happen.

          Yes, this was partly the point of IPv6 day. It's not just large websites who are supposed to get involved. It's everyone. The idea was that everyone had some kind of target date to aim at to get IPv6 capable from vendors of websites to carriers to ISPs rather than just lagging around waiting for everyone else to do it.

          Unfortunately, it's not turned out to be quite as planned and a lot of carriers and ISPs haven't bothered and we're still stuck with IPv4 for the forseeable future until we really REALLY run o

          • by tftp (111690)

            Yesterday I followed a few links here and there, but whenever I find an IPv6 router setup [pfsense.org] it ends up being horrendously complicated, with acronyms flying around unchecked. One can understand this only if he already knows it all.

            What I need is a simple thing that can be plugged into an existing IPv4 router (taking a routable static IP address or - even better - not doing that.) I want to have IPv6 on the other side of the thing. The box should have an IPv6 firewall, a DHCP server (if required) and perhaps

  • by wmbetts (1306001) on Thursday June 02, 2011 @05:03PM (#36324954)

    Will it include just http traffic or every service be 100% IPv6?

  • Comcast claims to be participating in World IPv6 day, and in response I have added the necessary IPv6 support packages to my router (OpenWRT FTW.) Currently all I get are link-local addresses, so hopefully something real will filter on down on June 8th.

    • by metamatic (202216)

      If you only get link-local addresses, you're not fully set up. You need to either use an RFC3068 [ietf.org] anycast tunneling, or set up an explicit tunnel.

      Assuming you go the anycast route (since that's what Comcast being ready for IPv6 would imply), once your router is configured properly your systems should autoconfigure themselves with globally routable IPv6 addresses starting with 2002.

    • by XanC (644172)

      Participation by ISPs simply means that they'll be ready to answer support questions and handle problems if they show up. It doesn't have anything to do with actually turning on IPv6. This test is more about making sure that sites can advertise both A and AAAA records without breaking things.

  • Cogent is ruining it (Score:5, Interesting)

    by bahamat (187909) on Thursday June 02, 2011 @05:35PM (#36325414) Homepage
    World IPv6 day is unfortunately DOA due to Cogent being a bunch of jackasses and not allowing certain peering arrangements. There are unfortunately two IPv6 Internets. One of people who use Cogent and one for everyone else.

    Google, Yahoo! and Hurricane Electric, as well as many other sites are all on Cogent's "no peer with you" list. If you're a Cogent customer you should get on the phone.
    • by dch24 (904899)
      +1 Wish I had mod points right now

      What cogent thinks it is accomplishing by refusing to peer IPv6, I don't know. All I can do is guess, and I guess it is so they can use it as a stick to beat other networks with to get better peering agreements.
      • by Agent Green (231202) on Thursday June 02, 2011 @11:06PM (#36327884)

        I think it's a matter of Cogent trying to strongarm its position. It wouldn't be the first time Cogent has done this and it certainly won't be the last. Doing a Google search for "peering dispute", and not including Comcast (to exclude the Comcast vs. Level3 dispute since it's newer and ongoing), almost every old entry involves Cogent duking it out with someone. They win customers on price, but things seem to be lopsided enough that they get into a scuffle with a number of the other Tier-1 providers.

        Mike from HE spells it out pretty clearly from almost 2 years ago on the NANOG list:

        http://www.merit.edu/mail.archives/nanog/msg01006.html [merit.edu]

        I have no reason to think that their stance has changed any.

  • which makes this test totally useless and I'm in the States.

    • by Fez (468752)

      See my comment later in the post here. You can get a free IPv6 tunnel from http://tunnelbroker.net/ [tunnelbroker.net] if you have a router/firewall capable of establishing a GIF tunnel. pfSense (2.0 with the IPv6 code branch [pfsense.org]), m0n0wall, and DD-WRT [dd-wrt.com] and friends can do this.

    • which makes this test totally useless.

      No, it doesn't. This test is about seeing what happens when providers add AAAA records. On the 8th, look very carefully for issues with your network, and if you see anything strange, file bugs with your ISP.

    • by davew (820) on Thursday June 02, 2011 @07:58PM (#36326634) Homepage Journal

      The test is aimed squarely at you.

      What stops the large content providers from serving over IPv6 right now today is a level of brokenness that affects a fraction of a percent of users. These are computers or networks which are nominally IPv4 only, but have some misconfigured IPv6 setup that is actively causing problems connecting to sites. The proportion of users is tiny, but if you're facebook, that's still a lot of users. Wednesday next will expose these problems on a temporary, scheduled basis.

      If you run IT support for an organisation, it would be wise to see the results of, say, the RIPE IPv6 eye chart [ripe.net] on your client machines.

  • I posted a comment much like this in the last IPv6 thread, but here it goes again. :-)

    [Disclaimer: I am a pfSense developer, so I'm a bit biased. For those of you who don't know what pfSense is, it's a BSD-based firewall distribution.]

    pfSense 2.0 won't officially support IPv6, but there is a branch available that does IPv6 which will later become 2.1. I'm running it on my home router with a GIF tunnel to Hurricane Electric (http://he.net, http://tunnelbroker.net/ [tunnelbroker.net]) to get IPv6 even though my ISPs do not have

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Unless Verizon plans to KEEP IPv6 on, I am not going to bother with this. What is the point of wasting my time setting up and configuring IPv6 access if the next day, all of that work is gone down the drain and no longer functions? I am not going to waste my time with buggy software, a buggy router, and spending the time to debug them, just to use IPv6 for a day. If it stayed on for good for those users who set it up on IPv6 day, I'd have no problem setting it up and debugging it to get it working.

    TLDR:

    • by noahm (4459)
      The point of IPv6 test day is not to test IPv6 connectivity. We know the protocol works. The point is to give the ISPs and site operators experience with running their sites in a dual-stack configuration. Even by accessing these sites via IPv4, you're taking part in this experiment. IPv4 will be around for a long time, and network operators need to know how things are going to go when some of their users are on v6 and others are on v4. Your ISP, even if they shut off end-user v6 access after v6 day, will
      • by Koutarou (38114)

        Tell this to the japanese ISPs, most of whom are planning on deploying bind9.7's AAAA-filter (which only returns AAAA records if the recursive dns server gets the query via a v6 connection) for v6-day, which will mitigate most of the interesting breakage scenarios and edge-cases in the name of avoiding customer complaints.

  • I have native IPv6 connectivity at home due to an enlightened ISP.

    However, my employer has no interest in IPv6, despite repeated cajoling. I believe this to be common in the workplace. Why spend money until it's a crisis?

    This "World IPv6 Day" will be a flop and will set back adoption.

    • by Skapare (16644)
      In the mean time, all the warez, tunez, moveez, and pr0n will be migrating to IPv6, where it can operate freely, unhindered by the lawyers.
  • I'm shocked to see goatse and tubgirl are not making the switch.

  • In related news, Slashdot ("news for nerds") announced a full-scale Unicode and IPv6 test, to be deployed as soon as hell freezes over.
    Seriously, the absence of both technologies on this self-proclaimed "nerd" site is shameful at least.

  • ... based on prior conversations I have had with representatives from my ISP about their (lack of any) ipv6 initiative that my ISP will *NOT* be participating. (Shaw)

    The only reason I'm staying with them is because they are the only one that services my area which lets residential subscribers have two dynamic ipv4 addresses, which I'm going to continue to need as long as ipv4 stays relevant.

  • Some Internet Service Providers like Plusnet is currently showcasing IPv6 technology today, giving customers the chance to test out the new technology for 24 hours. Will be interesting to read about their experience and comments. check it out http://bit.ly/kVSoJE [bit.ly]

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