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Google Now Second-Largest ISP 71

Posted by samzenpus
from the all-hail-the-google dept.
bednarz writes "Google is now the second-largest carrier of Internet traffic, accounting for 6.4% of all web traffic, according to data released this week by Arbor Networks. But should IT execs care? Yes, says Craig Labovitz, Arbor's chief scientist, who argues that IT managers need to understand how macro Internet traffic trends will affect the design and management of their own network backbones. 'This will affect how enterprises plan their services... whether they host their own services or whether they use cloud vendors,' Labovitz says. 'The enterprise needs to shift its thinking in terms of [service level agreements] and the way it measures, monitors and secures its networks. That all used to be focused on connectivity, but now it needs to be focused on content.'"
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Google Now Second-Largest ISP

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  • blah blah blah (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Elbereth (58257) <krachtm@yahoo.com> on Wednesday October 27, 2010 @07:42PM (#34044380) Homepage Journal

    blah blah blah GOOGLE blah blah blah IT MANAGERS blah blah blah NETWORK BACKBONE blah blah blah THE CLOUD blah blah blah THE ENTERPRISE blah blah blah.

    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by Zakias (444869)

      Bonk bonk!
      Bonk on the head!
      Grup! Bonk bonk!

    • by timeOday (582209)
      Did you miss this part?

      Increasingly, whether you're a consumer or an enterprise, you care not about reaching thousands of different Web sites. You care about the 20 social networking, cloud vendor and partner sites that you do business with."... The Arbor Networks' data points to a future where Internet traffic consolidates on the networks of a handful of carriers and content providers - what Arbor calls "hyper giants."

      If this is true, the Internet is headed for massive consolidation, until it is in the gr

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        No, I think he got that part, it was right here:

        IT MANAGERS blah blah blah NETWORK BACKBONE blah blah blah THE CLOUD blah blah blah THE ENTERPRISE blah blah blah.

    • 'nuff said
  • A large proportion of that traffic should be from GoogleBot. And I wouldn't consider Google an ISP, but just a Service(s) Provider.
    • Actually from where I heard this story originally, it SHOULD include Youtube, etc.
    • Re: (Score:1, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      A large proportion of that traffic should be from GoogleBot. And I wouldn't consider Google an ISP, but just a Service(s) Provider.

      hahaha, yeah, just an "Internet" Service Provider ;-)

    • by Skal Tura (595728)

      service provider which providers services in the internet .... hmmph... Call this quite a leap, but doesn't that mane an internet service provider? ;)

      (Yes i know, most people think ISP means those which provides your broadband only ...)

  • So much and yet. (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Phopojijo (1603961)
    And yet so many people think that Google *is* the internet these days.
    • And the rest think the web is the internet. I heard someone on TV last week refer to Tim Berners-Lee as the inventor of the Internet, and that it was invented in 1990 :/ I don't even think he should get full credit for inventing the web, considering that hypertext and Xanadu were invented long before.

    • by Macrat (638047)

      And yet so many people think that Google *is* the internet these days.

      It's NOT the internet?

      How did people get to a web site with a browser before Google allowed you to search for it?

  • TFA won't say who's ahead of google :(
  • by Looce (1062620) * on Wednesday October 27, 2010 @07:48PM (#34044440) Journal

    And I thought Google TiSP [google.com] was just a joke...

  • If Google is an Internet Service Provider then where is the access because I would LOVE to drop AT&T DSL and use something that has better pricing with better bandwidth (AT&T DSL is the only fucking option where I live to all you competition is good assholes out there)

    Now I would agree with a statement that Google is one of the largest consumers of internet bandwidth, or they are one of the largest content providers on the internet, but ISP...come on. Next thing you know some /.'ers will be harping

    • by Macrat (638047)

      If Google is an Internet Service Provider then where is the access because I would LOVE to drop AT&T DSL and use something that has better pricing with better bandwidth (AT&T DSL is the only fucking option where I live to all you competition is good assholes out there)

      According to the hype, Verizon FIOS is "coming soon" everywhere. :-)

      Now I would agree with a statement that Google is one of the largest consumers of internet bandwidth, or they are one of the largest content providers on the internet, but ISP...come on.

      Keep in mind that they provide wifi acces for most of the area around the city of Mountain View, CA. But yeah, not that big of an ISP.

  • by prakslash (681585) on Wednesday October 27, 2010 @07:50PM (#34044466)
    From the linked article:

    Only one tier 1 provider – a wholesaler to other ISPs – carries more Internet traffic on its backbone network than Google does (Arbor declined to identify the provider)

    Arbor may decline to identify the largest provider but this is Slashdot, damn it. You know you will find the answer here.

    And, the answer is... Level 3 Communications [wikipedia.org]

    • What happend to Akamari? Don't they serve much more data then google?

      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Don't they serve much more data then google?

        No, but I'd guess they serve pretty good sushi.

        • Re: (Score:1, Funny)

          by Anonymous Coward

          Don't they serve much more data then google?

          No, but I'd guess they serve pretty good sushi.

          That joke made me roefl.

      • I suspect that a lot of Akamai's data transfer is either not counted or not attributed to Akamai because it comes from "inside" the eyeball ISPs.

      • by pavon (30274) on Wednesday October 27, 2010 @09:29PM (#34045168)

        This has nothing to do with how much data the company serves. It is a measure of how much content flows over the company's pipes. AFAIK, Akamai doesn't have it's own pipes - they buy transit just like everyone else. Google on the otherhand purchased large amounts of dark fiber after the dot-com bust, and use it to decrease their bandwidth costs.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by TubeSteak (669689)

      TFA is a puff piece interview of the guy who put out the press release.
      Amazingly shoddy journalism.

      Here's what he said in the comments

      Comment Post by: Craig Labovitz -- October 26th, 2010 @ 7:47 am EST Reply
      Given commercial sensitivities, we are not disclosing any rankings of other providers. Though most backbone engineers would probably have the right guess.

      It's not a secret that Level 3 is #1 and will probably stay that way since they can easily increase their bandwidth.

  • And here's why:

    Google is already in our internet search lives, our phones, and email. Google is already plotting to get into our living rooms and kitchens. Where will this stop? Guys, I am getting quite concerned about Google. Who wouldn't be?

    • by IrritableBeing (1281212) on Wednesday October 27, 2010 @09:19PM (#34045124)

      And here's why:

      Google is already in our internet search lives, our phones, and email. Google is already plotting to get into our living rooms and kitchens. Where will this stop? Guys, I am getting quite concerned about Google. Who wouldn't be?

      I am more concerned that they have ALL OF THIS MONEY and still have not made a cheap, realistic sex doll.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by onefriedrice (1171917)

      And here's why:

      Google is already in our internet search lives, our phones, and email. Google is already plotting to get into our living rooms and kitchens. Where will this stop? Guys, I am getting quite concerned about Google. Who wouldn't be?

      I'm not really concerned about Google. I do use Google's search engine (with their analytics servers redirecting to 127.0.0.1). Otherwise, Google is not in my phone or email. They're also not going to get into my living room or kitchen without a drop-dead amazing product, and I'm fairly confident they won't be able to impress me enough with anything they could offer. Probably the fact that they're the second largest ISP is more concerning to me than any of that other stuff, but I also don't have any rea

      • You know, this is Slashdot, and I am among those who use AdBlock Pro, NoScript and /etc/hosts autoupdated via cron for a nice, clean surfing experience. So I hear what you're saying concerning Google Analytics going to the loop interface. Not allowing GA via NoScript also works well.

        But being a freelance consultant with multiple web sites using GA (and Piwik, mind you), it's not feasible, because if you block GA via *any* method, you can't query your own statistics any more. Allowing and disallowing GA ever

        • by Muros (1167213)

          but boy, this is unelegant.

          Your spelling is pretty unelegant too.

          • by Doctor O (549663)

            Congratulations! You've just found out which prefix my native language uses for the adjective "elegant"! You win as many washing machines as you can carry at once. Collect at the exit to your left. ;P

    • Re: (Score:1, Troll)

      by PietjeJantje (917584)
      And Google is in your slashdot, modding your and mine comment to oblivion (you troll!), while minifying/laughing away/ridiculing any concerns and placing insightful comments about how all is well.
    • He's got every book, every fact, every song in the world. If I'm shopping for something, he can show me the prices nearby that it's offered at. He can bring me anything that is sold in all the world. He can tell me how to get to anywhere, and sell me tickets too. He'll even show my my place in the Universe. He knows so much about me that when I ask him the news, he only gives me the news I find interesting - and he found this out because I told him.

      It's threatening. Though he's not done anything mean

    • Re: (Score:1, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Google is already in our internet search lives, our phones, and email.

      They are only there if you intentionally put them there.

      Google is already plotting to get into our living rooms and kitchens.

      "Plotting"? You could have said "building stuff people want", but it wouldn't sound as upsetting.

      Where will this stop?

      Google's data on you will stop wherever you tell them to stop. Be an adult, make your choice, and stop complaining.

      Guys, I am getting quite concerned about Google. Who wouldn't be?

      I am not concerned. If I consider something to be sensitive, I don't put it where google can see it. Being upset with Google because you can't prove they didn't do something you don't like with information you chose to give them is ridiculo

  • by nurb432 (527695)

    So when will they be selling access points in my area?

    • With all of the passwords and other data they've taken without permission (regardless of whether you think it's okay), what do you think they'll do if you use an internet connection provided by them, and agree to their terms of service that they can change at any time?
      • Re: (Score:1, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Every ISP has a terms of service which they can change at any time. They also have access to all the data that goes through their pipes. What's your point?

        • My point is having Google as the ISP isn't guaranteed to make things better than they are with the current ISP.
  • dude (Score:2, Insightful)

    by iteyoidar (972700)
    'This will affect how enterprises plan their services... whether they host their own services or whether they use cloud vendors,' Labovitz says. 'The enterprise needs to shift its thinking in terms of [service level agreements] and the way it measures, monitors and secures its networks. That all used to be focused on connectivity, but now it needs to be focused on content.'"

    I read this through 3 times and I'm still pretty sure it doesn't mean anything at all
    • Studies have shown that comprehension levels this type of statement tend to correlate with levels of hair-pointiness.

  • Really, is it fair to call them the largest ISP? Sure, they may technically be an ISP, and they may have a ton of search traffic, but those two are non-inclusive of each other. They don't actually provide connectivity to millions of customers like Comcast or Verizon do. As for selling wholesale Tier 1 access, I doubt it's more than Global Crossing or AT&T.

    My big issue with this article is that it reads like a plug for cloud-based (what's that supposed to mean again?), a.k.a content-based hosting when th
  • On top of that, this past week Google bid 2 billion to acquire 111 Eighth Ave, New York's ISP hub in Manhattan http://www.dailyfinance.com/story/google-near-purchase-of-nyc-landmark-building-at-111-eighth-ave/19692398/ [dailyfinance.com]
  • Not an ISP (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Nethead (1563) <joe@nethead.com> on Wednesday October 27, 2010 @09:44PM (#34045252) Homepage Journal

    Google is not an ISP. They are a content provider with a whole bunch of really good peering contracts and private fiber. They are not (yet) an ISP.

    ISPs provide Internet service to end users. I don't even include transport providers (Level3, UUnet, Sprint, GBLX, etc.) as ISPs.

    There are not many pure ISPs left. Clearwire is about the only one I can think of on a national scale.

    • I'd argue they are now an ISP:

      Stanford Fiber Network, provided by Google.
      http://news.cnet.com/8301-30684_3-20020364-265.html [cnet.com]

      This is only the pilot. Then begins the rollout in the city that wins their earlier fiber competition.

      Also, some pure ISPs still exist. Megapath (previously Covad, Speakeasy, etc.) for example. Clearwire is a wholesale "4G" provider for Sprint first, and an ISP second.

    • by ishobo (160209)

      One can get a DS1 or higher from Level3, UUnet, Sprint, etc... They are all ISPs that cater to the business segment. In terms of largest, that would depend on the criteria used. Simply counting the sum of all traffic flowing through a company's network is not legitimate. A better metric would be to count only the traffic that originates and ends at a customer access point.

      Network World distorted what Arbor was saying and Slashdot continued its fine tradition of being a clusterfuck of Internet wisdom.

    • by jroysdon (201893)

      Huh? Since when did UUNET/Verizon and Sprint stop being ISPs? I turned up circuits to both recently. They'll gladly sell you service, just call up and order a T1 or bigger.

      Just because you don't want to buy what they're selling doesn't make them not an ISP.

  • I haven't heard about it.

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