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Evidence of Russian Cyberwarfare Against Georgia 316

Posted by timothy
from the oh-this-won't-go-back-and-forth-forever dept.
An anonymous reader writes "In what seems to be a repeat of what happened in July, a few news sites have mentioned that there is evidence of a campaign against Georgia. For example, both the government's and the president's sites are inaccessible, among other official websites. For some analysis, the RBN Exploit blog demonstrates various traceroutes that have failed to several sites. They also claim that the RBN (Russian Business Network cyber-crime organisation) are behind the attacks, and that 'Many of Georgia's internet servers were under external control from late Thursday,' before the actual war began. Finally, according to this Twitter account of someone in Georgia (written in Russian), he claims that 'Russia has blocked access to Georgian websites from within Russia' (rough translation)."
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Evidence of Russian Cyberwarfare Against Georgia

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday August 09, 2008 @11:41PM (#24542477)

    After Google told them they were based in Atlanta, Georgia.

    • by reporter (666905) on Sunday August 10, 2008 @01:14AM (#24542991) Homepage
      The Kremlin is now issuing official statements accusing the Georgians of committing genocide. The Russians are using this lie to justify invading Georgia and seizing it.

      To understand how Russian "justice" works, read the shocking story [washingtonpost.com] published by "The Washington Post" (TWP). Natalia Trufanova was driving a Zhiguli [washingtonpost.com] (a lightweight Russian car) with her family in Moscow in September of 2007. She was minding her own business and dutifully obeying the traffic laws. Then, suddenly, a motorcade carrying Supreme Court President Vyacheslav Lebedev and coming from the opposite direction entered the wrong lane -- the lane in which Trufanova was driving. A vehicle in the motorcade smashed into the Zhiguli, killing Trufanova and her family. The Russian police wrote a false report, claiming that Trufanov drove into the wrong lane.

      TWP notes, "When angry witnesses started posting video on the Web clearly showing that it was the motorcade that was driving in the wrong lane, the lead investigator looking into the accident said that he didn't have access to the Internet."

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by TrueRecord (1101681)
        Chronologically it was this way: At midnight between the 7th and 8th of August Georgian regular army started heavy bombings of the villages and Tskhinvali, the capital of South Ossetia full of people btw. The villages were wiped out. The city was destroyed. For about 15 hours there were only Georgian forces, the forces of defenders of South Ossetia, the peace keepers who could not do anything but watch, and civilians who were taken by surprise. About 2000 non-combatants were murdered by the bombardments, t
      • No way am I supporting those Georgians. May I remind my fellow Americans that a Georgian separatist once tried to kill [imdb.com] the governor of California?
      • Putin is KGB. He is running Russia. He is running Russian media. That makes my process to doubt Russian reports from the start until proved otherwise.

        This is a prime example of why we shouldn't outsource information technology work to places like Russia and China. What I think is scary is that the company that programmed the provisioning/network system for a major Canadian telco (starts with a T), and a significant number of other telco provisioning systems, outsources the work to Russia. How does it fe

  • by ka9dgx (72702) on Saturday August 09, 2008 @11:49PM (#24542521) Homepage Journal
    I'd cut access to any country I was preparing to wage war against... it's common sense to help stop communications to fifth columnists. Of course, they'll route around it. --Mike--
    • by tchiseen (1315299) on Sunday August 10, 2008 @12:15AM (#24542681) Homepage
      I also am not surprised. Thousands of people have been killed in good old fashion bombings and shootings, why wouldn't they resort to other types of warfare and propaganda. I'm just surprised they're not doing more. I'm sure if Russia were inclined to, they could do more serious damage to Georgian communications infrastructure. In war, many of peoples rights are disrupted, including freedom of information.
      • by oliderid (710055) on Sunday August 10, 2008 @03:33AM (#24543553) Journal

        they could do more serious damage to Georgian communications infrastructure

        from what I understood, Russia just bombed a relatively important Georgian port and they are actively bombing a georgian town centre close to the border. I feel like Russia forces in the area are already bombing as much as they can. The whole Russian army isn't concentrated in that part of the world.

        Anyway it was truly foolish for the Georgian government to attack the rebel region if they knew that their army was no match for the Russian forces...If they didn't know, they should leave the office at once. You didn't need to be a expert to understand that.

        The truth is that Russia is about to seize two ex Georgian territories for some good reasons (oppressed minorities) and somes bad ones (Russia is historically interested by southern territories near the black sea...It all started in the XIX, see the crimea war). The current Georgian state cannot do much against it. They should concentrate themselves on economic recovery (there were good signs lately), diplomacy (looking for support in the west was a good idea...But it takes time...Such a strategy requires decades of hard work and diplomatic skills) and building a better future for their citizens.

        I had always some sympathy for Georgia, they used to be the last european bastion in front of invaders of all sort (mongols, muslims, etc.), I truly hope they'll get the leaders they deserve.

        • by n dot l (1099033)

          Anyway it was truly foolish for the Georgian government to attack the rebel region if they knew that their army was no match for the Russian forces...If they didn't know, they should leave the office at once. You didn't need to be a expert to understand that.

          My guess is they thought the Russians wouldn't dare fight back too hard after the US voiced support for Georgia entering NATO. They probably overestimated what words are worth in western politics.

        • by Cyberax (705495)

          There are enough air bases with bombers close enough to Georgia to bomb it back to stone age.

          Fortunately, Russia doesn't want to do it.

  • I don't know Russian... but I do know Google... so here's a bit of a mashup:
    Twitter | Google Translate
    http://translate.google.com/translate?u=http%3A%2F%2Ftwitter.com%2Fwardirect&hl=en&ie=UTF8&sl=ru&tl=en [google.com]
  • by ed__ (23481) on Saturday August 09, 2008 @11:59PM (#24542595) Journal

    Times like these are when the red cross is most appreciated. They will likely soon be flying in C-130's full of porn and lol-cats jpegs. 'Round the clock flights will continue until the Georgian internet connections can be restored.

    (additionally, the traceroutes could also fail because the routers and computers have been exploded by the russians with bombs from airplanes. this would be a worrying escalation of cyberwarfare).

  • by jdoeii (468503) on Sunday August 10, 2008 @12:11AM (#24542661) Homepage

    Georgia is a small republic with very little traffic to web resources under normal conditions. Now they are getting likely several orders of magnitude more traffic. And these are the consequences. But of course the "cyberwarfare" is much juicier piece for journalists to chew on.

    • ...where astroturfing, sock-puppetry, slanted journalism and propaganda matters far more than the reality on the ground. Slashdot is a contested territory, and it looks like Georgia's propaganda troops have launched a first strike.

      Not that I'm defending Russia here. The only reason Georgian astroturfers have overpowered the Russian ones on Slashdot is that the moronic Russian leadership, as usual, hasn't been investing enough resources in information warfare.

    • by flyingsquid (813711) on Sunday August 10, 2008 @04:04AM (#24543709)
      Georgia is a small republic with very little traffic to web resources under normal conditions. Now they are getting likely several orders of magnitude more traffic. And these are the consequences. But of course the "cyberwarfare" is much juicier piece for journalists to chew on.

      Please read the news once in a while. Russia has launched cyberattacks on smaller neighbors before, most notably Estonia. See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyberattacks_on_Estonia_2007 [wikipedia.org]

      By all accounts, Russia and Georgia are both to blame for what's going on here. But if you look at the pattern of behavior in the past few years... well, we've seen Russian dissidents poisoned with radioactive sushi, Russian journalists assassinated, an opposition leader in the Ukraine poisoned with dioxin... Jesus H. Christ, wake up and smell the coffee already. Maybe we don't think we're in the next phase of the Cold War, but Putin pretty clearly does, and he's acting accordingly.

      America has enough enemies in the world that we don't need to make another one out of Russia. And as an American, I don't see any real reason that the United States and Russia can't be allies, rather than enemies. But that doesn't matter; Putin quite clearly thinks otherwise, and that is the only thing that matters. Russia sees the West as a threat, and they are treating us (and the Western-allied Georgia) accordingly. This is not just Russia vs. Georgia, this is Russia vs. Georgia + EU + USA. And the question is, what are the EU and the USA going to do about it? The last thing the United States needs is more conflict and war, of course. But appeasing tyrants is generally not a good move, either.

      • I wonder if Georgia made this move without informing the US first. Not that Georgia needs to receive the USA's consent before doing anything, but lets face it, Georgia is heavily relying on the United States influence should the conflict go south (and it is). This is one of those moments where Russia is testing the international community, and flexing its military muscle against an small nation that wants badly to join NATO. Luckily for Russia Georgia has not been given better access to NATO equipment (espe

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by demachina (71715)

        "But appeasing tyrants is generally not a good move, either."

        The problem the U.S. has here is much of the world thinks Bush is a tyrant. Because he invaded Iraq under false pretenses, and condoned torturing people he doesn't really have any moral high ground to stand on at this point. I recall when Bush and the U.S. started lecturing Putin about issues with elections in Russia he shot back that the elections in the U.S., after irregularities in Florida, Georgia, Ohio and Alabama, weren't anything to be br

    • by Yvanhoe (564877)
      After the whole "OMG Iran is DISCONNECTED! War is nigh !" mess a few months ago, I'm waiting for more than a few failed pings and traceroute before acknowledging for cyber-warfare. A lot of mess can be caused by large-scale power disruption and people (especially governmental admins) moving from places to places with a big part of their infrastructure.

      Maybe I am showinf an arrogant bias but, is the IT infrastructure of Georgia redundant enough to resist a real-world conflict ?
  • No shit! (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Guppy06 (410832) on Sunday August 10, 2008 @12:13AM (#24542671)

    "In what seems to be a repeat of what happened in July, a few news sites have mentioned that there is evidence of a campaign against Georgia."

    A campaign against Georgia? You don't say! What tipped you off, the explosions? The Black Sea Fleet moving off the coast? The miles-long military convoys crossing into Georgian territory? The planes dropping bombs in populations centers?

    Oh, the IP logs. Can't have a real war until Netcraft confirms it, I s'pose.

    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by OctaviusIII (969957)
      Sorry, what? There's a war? I was just watching CNN and all they had on was John Edward's affair... no, wait, I think there's something in the news crawl... "Russia invades Georgia/Governor recalls National Guard/Declares 'I had no idea!'"

      Huh, go figure.
  • Great Jokes (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward

    Everyone is making fun of the invasion of a democratic country?

    Thats slashdot for ya i guess. Depends on which country does the invading.

    • Everyone is making fun of the invasion of a democratic country?

      Thats slashdot for ya i guess. Depends on which country does the invading.

      Nah. But just see how many people here get upset if you cut off their access to pirated pr0n, movies and tunes or even threaten the possibility.

      Cheers,
      Dave

    • by Vexorian (959249)
      Is democracy supposed to prevent a country from being invaded?
    • Everyone is making fun of the invasion of a democratic country?

      Do you mean Georgia, or South Ossetia? Because both have democratically elected leaders and parliaments.

  • So they claim that the RBN was doing russian government will? That is (government's) organized crime, Discworld version.

    Is not the same to have a group of people that believing government sponsorized news decide by their own to cyber-attack a country, to being hired by or belong to the government to do that.
    • by kaos07 (1113443)

      What's the difference between the government and the Mafia?

      One of them is organised.

  • Dude, when the Georgian President realizes that he can't retrieve all of his data from the Google cloud, he's going to be so P.O.'d.
  • Oh nevermind...

  • Go Georgia! (Score:2, Insightful)

    by mi (197448)

    Time to root for the little country trying to get its own territory back under its own control.

    Puting's claims of "genocide" [bbc.co.uk] are pathetic and would only work on the already brainwashed Russians [libertyforum.org] themselves. Seeing these assholes trumpet their government's lies is just as scary as seeing Chinese bloggers' anti-Tibet postings [slashdot.org].

    They are trying to paint South Osetia as some sort of Kosovo, where the evil Georgians deserve to be punished the same way Serbians did. Except, unlike then, there is no genocide or "

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by velen (1198819)
      The territory claimed independence back in 1991. Kinda late to stake claim to it again, don't you think?
    • Re:Go Georgia! (Score:5, Interesting)

      by clarkkent09 (1104833) on Sunday August 10, 2008 @12:46AM (#24542851)
      Actually, the closest thing to genocide in Kosovo occurred after NATO moved in and the Serbs were ethnically cleansed from most of it. What happened before that was actually very similar to what's happening in South Ossetia, a minority in a defined territory seeking independence and resorting to military means to achieve it with the help of a foreign power. Just replace Russia with USA and the parallels are very clear. As we now know, the atrocities of the Serbs in crushing that rebellion were much exaggerated by the western media and as the UN court recently acknowledged there was no genocide or ethnic cleansing involved. Actually the percentage of Albanians in Kosovo killed during all the years of Milosevic rule was smaller than the percentage of South Ossetians killed in just couple of days of Georgian attack.

      Note: not saying that what happened in Kosovo was all right by any means, my point is that the parallels between the two situations are entirely justified and they expose hypocrisy by the west. There is hypocrisy in the Russian position as well but at least they pay a lip service to preservation of territorial integrity (as per international law) in both cases.
      • by Plutonite (999141)

        What? Do you have any idea how many moslem women were systematically gang raped by serbian forces over the course of their captivity? Have you not seen pictures of the mass graves of their husbands? Do you really think NATO went to war for ideals like the ones coming from Putin?

        And like others have stated, just because there is no "good guy" in this conflict doesn't mean we cannot put correct labels on the respective atrocities being committed by either side. Georgia bombed and killed 1500 civilians in thei

        • by drinkypoo (153816)

          Genocide is only genocide when you have, you know, genocide. Otherwise at worst it's attempted genocide. Murder is bad no matter what you call it, but there's times when a label is appropriate and times when it isn't. Even using the word genocide is similar to invoking Hitler - it may be warranted, but it is polarizing. That doesn't mean you shouldn't do it, but you should be correct. Killing 1500 civilians isn't genocide unless you're destroying an entire people outright - it's enough to call it an atrocit

        • by drinkypoo (153816)
          Genocide is only genocide when you have, you know, genocide. Otherwise at worst it's attempted genocide. Murder is bad no matter what you call it, but there's times when a label is appropriate and times when it isn't. Even using the word genocide is similar to invoking Hitler - it may be warranted, but it is polarizing. That doesn't mean you shouldn't do it, but you should be correct. Killing 1500 civilians isn't genocide unless you're destroying an entire people outright - it's enough to call it an atroc
      • by mi (197448)

        Just replace Russia with USA and the parallels are very clear.

        No — and I tried to forestall this argument, that Putin has put into your head. Unlike Russia, US was not justifying its actions by giving Kosovars citizenship. That's was a difference in method. The goal is different too — unlike Russia, US did not gain — nor planned to gain — any territory. If you are still seeing parallels, you need to remove those glasses, that Russian propaganda gave to you — the "parallels" mus

    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by whong09 (1307849)
      What is this, Red Scare v2.0?
    • by Vexorian (959249)
      Yeah, I mean no big power should ever invade a little country. Oh , unless we are the big country and are chasing a terrorist, even though we wouldn't even find the terrorist there...
    • by tetromino (807969) on Sunday August 10, 2008 @02:39AM (#24543311)

      This may be hard for an American mind to grasp, but *there are no good guys here*.

      Georgians are not good guys. Their goal is to militarily crush a national independence movement and to subjugate a people who hate the Georgians' guts. They've been planning this blitzkrieg operation for years (a nation doesn't increase its military spending by a factor of 30 if they aren't planning to invade somebody.) They cynically violated ceasefire terms, used massed artillery to bombard residential areas (killing ~1400 Ossetian civilians in one day), and were ethnically cleansing Ossetian villages. Now that their military effort has failed, they've launched a massive propaganda offensive to convince ignorant westerners that white is black and that a nation that launched an offensive war is somehow a victim.

      But Russians ain't good guys either. Instead of trying to limit the killing, it looks like they are escalating the conflict by supporting the Abkhazians in Kodori. They are cynically using the excuse of protecting Ossetians from genocide to conduct a massive bombing campaign against Georgia's military infrastructure. And Russia has neither the desire nor the technological capability to limit collateral damage from its bombs.

      What you are seeing is, essentially, a small bully being bullied by a bigger bully.

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by BillyGee (981263)

        Weeeelll....actually it's more like Russia has been planning this for years. Those Ossetian peaceniks you talk about opened fire across the "border" at Georgian villages, knowing Georgia had vowed to protect their territory. Of course they wouldn't have done this without knowing Russia had an invasion plan ready.

        Or do you really believe a country whose leadership insists that "we can't control this, our volunteers have taken action", while fighter jets and bombers are flying about and tank columns are rol

        • by tetromino (807969) on Sunday August 10, 2008 @03:40AM (#24543591)

          No, Russia was not planning this for years - primarily because this war significantly weakens Russia's position. Russia's main goal is to keep Georgia out of NATO. To do so, all it had to do was sponsor the Ossetian and Abkhazian independence movements (nations with unrecognized de-facto independent provinces are not allowed to be NATO members). But now that Russia has sent an army brigade into South Ossetia, the Ossetian independence movement no longer looks genuine (some Western observers have compared it to a Russian land-grab), and as a result, there is now a good chance that Georgia will be let into NATO. Given that starting this war would make it much harder to achieve Russia's foreign policy goals, do you really think Russia would have wanted to start it?

          The invasion of Ossetia was a very shrewd move on Georgia's part. Massive military retaliation was the least bad of several bad response moves that Russia had at its disposal.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      I'm sorry, but WHY bombing Serbia to "protect" "innocent" albanians in Kosowo is "right", and trying to protect osetinian people is wrong? Pay attention, that S.Osetia had "de facto" independence from 1992, and until Georgians got US weapons and training they have not tried to attack it. Kosowo had not any indepence. Or, why "liberating" Kosowo is "good" and deliberating Serbska Kraina (Serbian republic in Kroatia) is good too?

      Oh, of course there is Afganistan and Iraq. Why Soviet Union got "Evil empire" t

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by c0sine (959434)
      What own territory? Osetia is de-facto independent country since 1992. You are afraid of next year Russian ride? Well, let's see what US was doing in Georgia since 2002: military training and aid, CIA presence, etc. Any comments on that, Mr. So-Smart-Man?
    • I concur, wholeheartedly.

  • by Jophiel04 (1341463) on Sunday August 10, 2008 @12:39AM (#24542815)
    Gotta give credit to the Presidents of Latvia, Estonia, Lithuania, and Poland. They may be small nations, but they talk like they've got a pair...

    http://www.president.lt/en/news.full/9475 [president.lt] [Joint Press Release on the Lithuanian President's Webpage]

    I know it's not so slashdotty, but it's relevant to the conflict in general and interesting nonetheless.
    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Alex Belits (437) *

      Latvia, Estonia, Lithuania, and Poland -- where have I seen this list before?

      Oh, that's right, it's the list of countries that had sucking up to US and taking political potshots at Russia as the cornerstone of their foreign policy since 1991. With such famous successes as celebrating Estonian Nazi volunteers (Estonia, obviously), providing torture camps for their new American friends (Poland), harassing Russians traveling between a small Russian exclave accessible only through their territory and the rest o

    • Thanks a lot for that link. It restores some of my trust in humankind.

  • Re: Translation (Score:2, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward

    Good translation, and thanks for the twitters.
    The person also mentions that protesters are out in Tbilisi, notwithstanding Russian bombing runs, that Russian hackers are attacking any news site that relates what is really going on in Georgia, that he has asked some hacker friends to attack CMI (rough translation of a Russian news site) and they have (seemingly) complied, that he hears rumblings - the light has been knocked out, as well as telephone towers and no TV exists now, and finally asks for humanity

  • Behold, the future of War! [antipope.org]

    Hell, I'd take what he depicts there to the usual government-sanctioned mass-murder type of war...
    • by emj (15659)

      My thought exactly, it's a good book describing more or less what happen in Estonia. Using fools to attack (basically telling lots of people on blogs to do things that are not that effective on its own, but in the large picture it does something..

  • Years ago I witnessed the comparatively clumsy and easily traceable assimilation of a major university's computing center into the botnet of organized crime from two countries now known as major spam havens and phishers' hideouts.

    The appropriate authorities were alerted to the danger of this becoming a national security risk as growing sophistication on the part of the perpetrators, if not held at bay early on, would allow them to wreak havoc on critical infrastructures "at their fingertips", as the bot h
  • THIS is why 4chan is down, right?

    --
    BMO

  • Sound just like a good SciFi book read, where you use lots of useful fools to take political action.

    Halting State [wikipedia.org] by Charles Stross

    Not that anyone read stuff this long down on slashdot...

  • by DynaSoar (714234) on Sunday August 10, 2008 @04:48AM (#24543869) Journal

    Anyone who is surprised at this is probably unaware that disruption, denial and subversion of communications is a common factor in all modern (as in more modern than two groups of grunting and growling rock throwers) warfare. Telegraph and phone lines got cut. Radio got jammed. Alexander had fires built upwind of enemy columns to make it hard for them to see each other easily. The US Army confiscated the radio of the British ham operator on Grenada that was broadcasting a running commentary of infantry firing over the heads of the medical students being "rescued". The US news broadcast footage clearly showed them being forced to run under a line of firing (most likely blanks) M-16s; the early news shows broadcast the ham operator's reports along with the footage, but his reports were absent from the late news broadcasts.

    Command and control (C2) refers to the ability of military commanders to carry out strategy and tactics. The addition of Communications (C3) refers to inclusion of the ability to carry out C2 without being present on the battlefield and the ability of units to coordinate over distance. That's the US version, the NATO version of C3 being "Consultation, Command and Control", just a different label for the same process. It's now frequently referred to as C4 because it includes computers. Since they are used for more than communication, the fourth C is not redundant. The other thing they're used for is data analysis for intelligence generation, so the "I" in "C4I" *is* redundant. And all the other extensions out to C4ISTAR is just showing off.

    Being "cyber", it's pertinent to /. but it's not news unless one assumes that one particular form of communication should be immune to this "time honored tradition".

  • IT.Sec.Con Insight (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward

    president.gov.ge took down it's MySQL database temporarily during the attack and changed it's front page during the downtime as an effort to reduce automated attacks upon it's initial page.

    The National Bank of Georgia took down it's images temporarily when it was attacked producing text-only pages. It has since restored them.

    There is no access to The Ministry of Foreign Affair's website, I have no inside information on what occurred but when the attacked start I do know they purposely turned off web service

  • DarthLion (Score:5, Funny)

    by DarthLion (1341939) on Sunday August 10, 2008 @05:49AM (#24544107)

    Big Mac Thesis: No two nations with McDonald's franchises have ever gone to War

    It seems like this rule is going to be broken.

    McDonalds Moscow vs MCDonalds Tbilisi

  • The new crop of Russian trolls on slashdot seems to be quite large and very vocal. I'm seeing a disproportionate number of posts attacking both Georgia and anyone who seems to support the Georgians. I have no idea if the Russians are really using the RBN to engage in cyberwar with Georgia as per the original article. A few posts note some legitimate reasons why various Georgian web sites are down or inaccessible. On the other hand, the number and vehemence of the pro-Russian posts even just here on slas

  • by The Mgt (221650) on Sunday August 10, 2008 @11:05AM (#24545639)

    Anyone else seeing Georgia, Armenia and Azerbaijan as blank areas with no towns or roads in Google Maps? The change happened sometime in the last few hours.

    • by Aramgutang (620327) on Monday August 11, 2008 @12:58AM (#24552079)

      Anyone else seeing Georgia, Armenia and Azerbaijan as blank areas with no towns or roads in Google Maps? The change happened sometime in the last few hours.

      Umm...WRONG!

      As someone who was born and raised in Armenia and often visits Google Maps to see if the map data or satellite imagery has been updated, I can definitively say that throughout the entire existence of Google Maps, all three Transcaucasian republics have always been blank with no road and city data.

  • the Russian state news agency (RIA Novosti) [en.rian.ru] web site is out since this morning? Their two DNS servers (her.rinet.ru, her.rian.ru) seem to have dropped off the face of the earth. Seems someone is might be engaged in cyberwarfare against them, doesn't it?

  • Twitter - English (Score:3, Informative)

    by geeky grrly (972631) on Sunday August 10, 2008 @04:55PM (#24548845) Homepage
    The owner of the Twitter account is also publishing in English: http://twitter.com/wardirect_en [twitter.com]

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