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China Crafts Cyberweapons 326

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the virtual-arms-race dept.
MitmWatcher writes to mention that a recent report by the Department of Defense revealed that China is continuing to build up their cyberwarfare units and develop viruses. "'The PLA has established information warfare units to develop viruses to attack enemy computer systems and networks,' the annual DOD report on China's military warned. At the same, Chinese armed forces are developing ways to protect its own systems from an enemy attack, it said, echoing similar warnings made in previous years."
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China Crafts Cyberweapons

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  • Sensible (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday May 28, 2007 @03:15PM (#19301653)
    Only sensible. News because they happen to be communist in name. Everyone else is doing the same things. This is like the revolutionary developments in bio-weapons by the major countries last century. China may actually have a better vision of the future in its defence policy than other nations.
    • Re:Sensible (Score:4, Funny)

      by smilindog2000 (907665) <bill@billrocks.org> on Monday May 28, 2007 @03:25PM (#19301737) Homepage
      We've been doing the same for years, I hear with some success. In the first Iraq war, I heard a story about an infected printer driver that Iraq downloaded that in theory played havoc with their network during the invasion. I also hear we have a special unit tasked to attack information systems in real time, during an invasion, and to protect our own network. How much fun would that job be? I am seriously envious.
      • Actually, the printer virus is a hoax. But it may have played some part in the overall information war strategy, in terms of psychological warfare / propaganda. Information warfare is as old as war itself - just read the Art of War. http://www.theregister.co.uk/2003/03/10/one_printe r_one_virus_one/ [theregister.co.uk]
        • Or... Maybe the hoax was a hoax...
          • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

            by Tatisimo (1061320)
            And maybe you people claiming to know what's a hoax are here to distract us in order to cover up an even bigger conspiracy.
        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by FLEB (312391)
          Thing of it is, you could probably pull something like that off quite easily now with the advent of USB and PnP. You could even homebrew something-- hide a hub in there, hook in a flashdrive with the virus on Autorun, and put the printer itself back in line. Make the virus (trojan?) quickly install itself, then hide the flashdrive.
    • Re:Sensible (Score:5, Interesting)

      by neomunk (913773) on Monday May 28, 2007 @03:26PM (#19301741)
      This is just a new battlefield, like between the world wars when everyone scrambled to get together some kind of airforce. Space hasn't been officially militarized yet because of cold war fears that led to a treaty banning that type of activity. It seems that certain powers in the world are changing their mind about that, but I digress...

      Yeah, cyberspace (I know, played out term, but it's common vernacular now) is a place (kinda) where strategy can be applied to hamper an enemies war fighting potential. Not only that, it can be the equivalent to infrastructure destruction when targeted at the private sector. Yep, all that advantage without firing a shot, without having to wait for resupply of ammunition and without putting a single person within killing range of the target.

      In other words, this is common sense.
    • by symbolset (646467) on Monday May 28, 2007 @04:05PM (#19302039) Journal

      It is notable here that China is one of the state entities that enjoys access to the source code for Window under Microsoft's SharedSource program. If you're in IT for a government agency in the US, it's your duty to ask 'what does China know about my critical infrastructure that I don't know?'

      Unfortunately for the people who rely on you, the answer is undiscoverable.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by OrangeTide (124937)
        Sounds like a good reason for every top tier government agency in the US (and possibly in other nations, Canada, UK, Australia, EU, ...) to ban Windows entirely. Top tier being any executive, military, or financial arm of the government. and any private or government entities that provide vital resources (electricity, water treatment, oil refining, mass transit systems, etc)
        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by Anonymous Coward
          Um. Ever wondered why Sun was still around? They make "Trusted Solaris". Any *important* computer systems already don't run windows.
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by supremebob (574732)
        They know enough about the security holes in Windows to have created and promoted their own Linux distribution called Red Flag Linux.

        That doesn't prove a conspiracy theory or anything, but it was probably a good idea anyway! Smart thinking, and I wish that the US government did the same thing. Red, White, and Blue Linux has a good ring to it.
  • OH NOES! (Score:5, Funny)

    by HappySmileMan (1088123) on Monday May 28, 2007 @03:15PM (#19301655)

    At the same, Chinese armed forces are developing ways to protect its own systems from an enemy attack, it said, echoing similar warnings made in previous years.
    China are trying to secure their computers? Do they not realise this is a declaration of war on the US?
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      Actual attacks on US military and government computers from China have been happening for years. There was especially a lot of crap flying during the "spy plane" incident a few years back.
  • Cowboys (Score:4, Funny)

    by SpectreBlofeld (886224) on Monday May 28, 2007 @03:18PM (#19301677)
    "...ICE patterns formed and reformed on the screen as he probed for gaps, skirted the most obvious traps, and mapped the route he'd take through Sense/Net's ICE. It was good ICE. Wonderful ICE... ...His program had reached the fifth gate. He watched as his icebreaker strobed and shifted in front of him, only faintly aware of his hands playing across the deck, making minor adjustments. Translucent planes of color shuffled like a trick deck. Take a card, he thought, any card.

    The gate blurred past. He laughed. The Sense/Net ice had accepted his entry as a routine transfer from the consortium's Los Angeles complex. He was inside. Behind him, viral subprograms peeled off, meshing with the gate's code fabric, ready to deflect the real Los Angeles data when it arrived."

    From Neuromancer, by William Gibson, following protagonist Henry Dorsett Case as he uses a Chinese military-made icebreaker to hack a virtual fortress...

    If only computer security were really so dramatic :)
    • by tzanger (1575)

      You know, I'm reading Neuromancer right now. I have never been able to make it though the book, not in any of the several attempts I've made of it over the past 15 or so years. I find I just cannot get in to it. I just started Chapter 5, and it's a chore to not just put the book away. People keep telling me it's good, but... ugh.

      • by Feyr (449684)
        i can't blame you. i did read it, twice even, but the writing style is pretty dense and it's hard to stay focused on it
    • Umm...wasn't it a Russian icebreaker?
  • Good.. (Score:5, Funny)

    by Pranab (1088713) on Monday May 28, 2007 @03:18PM (#19301683) Homepage
    Now we can buy millions of pirated copies of these weapons at almost nothing.
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Tablizer (95088)
      Now we can buy millions of pirated copies of these weapons at almost nothing.

      Yes, but the death and destruction only satisfies for a few hours and then you are hungry again.
               
  • And yet... (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Pantero Blanco (792776) on Monday May 28, 2007 @03:20PM (#19301701)
    The US will ignore this for the most part, keep trading with them, and allow corporations to send its citizens jobs to the nation that is attacking it. It makes me sick.
    • Re:And yet... (Score:5, Insightful)

      by mattpalmer1086 (707360) on Monday May 28, 2007 @03:45PM (#19301881)
      Hmmmm - if any other country invests in its military capability, it's equivalent to an attack on the US? That's got to be the most fearful stance I've heard in a long time, and especially perplexing coming from someone in the world's biggest military spender, by some very large margin.

      Do you not think it better to trade with countries and develop strong relations with them? You have another strategy?

      • Re:And yet... (Score:4, Interesting)

        by Pantero Blanco (792776) on Monday May 28, 2007 @03:54PM (#19301957)

        Hmmmm - if any other country invests in its military capability, it's equivalent to an attack on the US?

        Have you been offline for the past decade? Chinese attacks on US networks aren't some nebulous possibility; they've been going on for years. Quite a few articles about it have shown up right here on Slashdot.

        As for the US's military spending, that annoys me because it gets blown kicking over some dictator in the Middle East or chasing "terrorists" who kill less people than cars, instead of preparing for and dealing with real threats.

        Do you not think it better to trade with countries and develop strong relations with them?

        No, not while they're attacking.
        • by Harmonious Botch (921977) * on Monday May 28, 2007 @04:34PM (#19302227) Homepage Journal
          Are we assuming that our military isn't attacking them, too? It just seems like standard operating procedure to me.
        • As for the US's military spending, that annoys me because it gets blown kicking over some dictator in the Middle East or chasing "terrorists" who kill less people than cars, instead of preparing for and dealing with real threats. Do you not think it better to trade with countries and develop strong relations with them? No, not while they're attacking.

          Well unfortunately for him Saddam was ahead of the game but signed his own death warrant when he wanted to be paid in Euros for Iraqi oil. God forbid the U

        • Re:And yet... (Score:4, Insightful)

          by mattpalmer1086 (707360) on Monday May 28, 2007 @05:04PM (#19302413)

          Have you been off line for the past decade? Chinese attacks on US networks aren't some nebulous possibility; they've been going on for years. Quite a few articles about it have shown up right here on Slashdot.

          The article is about investing in cyberwar attack and defense in general, not about launching specific attacks. Yes, Chinese hackers have been targeting US systems and UK systems (and other western nations) for some time. And I imagine that there are US and UK hackers targeting Chinese systems. This is not a declaration of war; this is just business as usual.

          As for the US's military spending, that annoys me because it gets blown kicking over some dictator in the Middle East or chasing "terrorists" who kill less people than cars, instead of preparing for and dealing with real threats.

          I don't disagree with any of that!
    • by ushering05401 (1086795) on Monday May 28, 2007 @04:09PM (#19302069) Journal
      or off topic. When a country develops any sort of new military technology that creates increased competition with American military technology there is a political reappraisal. The dramatic example is nuclear technology, but many others exist. The parent poster is pointing out that these revelations of new military technology will not be handled with regard to China as they would with regard to many other nations.

      His comment is not particularly insightful, but his assertions are defendable:

      Slashdot has reported on attacks apparently coming from within China (titan rain), and attempts by China to disable U.S. spy sats (ground based laser something or other).

      The U.S. government continues to grant China 'Favored Trade Nation' status and facilitate the offshoring of work... esecially in manufacturing despite continued resistance from China to enforce safety/humanitarian regulations in those industries (something we require from our other top trading partners, though not from the poorer ones).

      The U.S. government continually ignores international organizations such as Amnesty International who attempt to open dialogue about human rights records.

      So now China is creating systems designed to realign the BOP on the net. How will the U.S. react? If it's track record holds true, then the U.S. will not react... which is really puzzling. True, if we have it, then others should not be prohibited... but that is now how we treat the non-chinas of the world.

      The only disputable or inflamatory statement made by parent is that he actually feels sick about this.

      Regards.

    • by clragon (923326)

      The US will ignore this for the most part, keep trading with them, and allow corporations to send its citizens jobs to the nation that is attacking it. It makes me sick.

      I would rather the US make the Chinese depend on them economically, thus maintaining peace, than to reply with a nuke.
  • by wizardforce (1005805) on Monday May 28, 2007 @03:21PM (#19301711) Journal

    Do they not realise this is a declaration of war on the US?

    not so much war as it is to prevent the US or other capitalist/democratic countries from undermining their regime. china is a known source of some cyber attacks- mainly from less organized hackers but now that it will be more organized- more bang for the buck. they probably wont try to destroy our systems completely as that would likely have a ripple effect on their economy as well- they sell a lot of stuff to us and where they to screw that up it would hurt them quite dearly. there is one thing that we have that they dont and that is oddly enough sheer number- if i remember correctly we out number them in computing power so if we ever needed to we could do a real DOS attack from hell on them.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by meringuoid (568297)
      they probably wont try to destroy our systems completely as that would likely have a ripple effect on their economy as well- they sell a lot of stuff to us and where they to screw that up it would hurt them quite dearly. there is one thing that we have that they dont and that is oddly enough sheer number- if i remember correctly we out number them in computing power so if we ever needed to we could do a real DOS attack from hell on them.

      In a shooting war, a DOS wouldn't work, certainly not against China.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by rucs_hack (784150)
      America is creating these kinds of weapons, so why would it be surprising that China would too? Although, given the other things that the US has been convinced other powerful nations had in the past that have been wrong, 'undetectable subs', WMDs, and so on, I wonder if this isn't being made to sound more significant then it really is.

      I liken this to the uproar about China developing space based weapons. Um, weren't the US doing it first?

      I'd see this more as a sign that China is catching up with the US in t
  • by onkelonkel (560274) on Monday May 28, 2007 @03:33PM (#19301779)
    1. Convince Chinese government that spam is a plot by Falun Gong.
    2. Half a million Peoples Liberation Army Cyberwar Programmers attack!
    3. ???
    4. Profit?
  • by Aaron England (681534) on Monday May 28, 2007 @03:33PM (#19301787)
    Last year the Secetary of the Air Force (SECAF) hijacked the realm of cyberspace for the Air Force, when he announced the Air Force's new mission to provide the President with "[options] in in air, space and now cyberspace." According to a recent congressional hearing, the Air Force Cyberpsace Command (AFCYBER) will be stood up sometime Summer 2007.

    http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?storyID=123030505 [af.mil]

  • by Xiph (723935)
    Best way of keeping peace, is by preparing for war, incidentally, best way of preparing for war, is excactly the same.
    If whatever country you live in, is not doing this, then shame on them.
    • Re:Yes? (Score:5, Interesting)

      by polar red (215081) on Monday May 28, 2007 @04:25PM (#19302163)
      BULLCRAP !!!!

      1/Europe was a warzone for a thousand years. The moment the EU(actually its predecessors) was founded, war ceased. The economic bonds between these member states prevent any war. No-one in his right mind would think of a war between 2 of the member states, and yet Europe is the least militarized zone in the world.
      2/the way people keep thinking of "enemies" is an outdated concept. At least in some parts of the world. Can you point them on the map? And Can you make a link to countries not involved in any war in 50 years ?

  • by dattaway (3088) on Monday May 28, 2007 @03:37PM (#19301823) Homepage Journal
    ...this should get interesting.
  • by drDugan (219551) * on Monday May 28, 2007 @03:41PM (#19301851) Homepage
    I have an image of thousands of Chineese computer specialists, working tirelessly in huge warehouses of cubicles. I can hear them mumbling now... "Collect metal, collect wood, collect magic talisman of sharpness, rrrun to forge, use skill +5 "Weapon Craft" with added +2 ring-of-the-crafter proficiency." Bingo! a new Shadow Axe of Sharpness, sold for 350 RMB on Ebay. Rinse and repeat.

  • ...my firewall blocks China completely. If anyone wants to enter, they first need to ask politely. Same could count for other countries by the way.
     
    This combined with severe passive OS fingerprinting delivers a good way to solve most issues (except DOS attacks ofcourse).
    Not perfect, but in the light of current state of internet affairs a most needed solution.
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by andrewjhall (773595)
      If you believe that a Chinese hacker couldn't hack into one of a few million PCs outside of China and then attack you from there, you're probably not giving them enough credit...
  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday May 28, 2007 @03:54PM (#19301965)
    Flash forward ten years ... a group of American military commanders are gathered around a conference table deep inside the pentagon to discuss the most recent Chinese cyber attacks on US infrastructure. Voices are raised, tensions are running high, and nobody can seem to reach agreement on the best way forward. But everyone knows that time is running short and that a response is needed.

    Suddenly, the huge video conference screen on the wall springs to life. A stern Chinese communist party official appears in a smart beige chairman-Mao suit. The shouting and arguments stop and an eerie silence descends. All eyes turn toward the Chinese official.

    He speaks.

    "How are you today gentlemen? All your base are belong to us."
  • by anubi (640541) on Monday May 28, 2007 @04:00PM (#19302005) Journal
    Doesn'e even this undermine to our nation just how important it is that we KNOW how our stuff works... and how to fix it if someone messes it up?

    Honestly, I am so frustrated with this "its someone else's responsibility to make it work" and other finger pointing paradigms. Its MY stuff, I bought it with legal tender, and if I don't know how to maintain it, do I really have that much business having it?

    If my dog made a mess, its obvious to me just what he did and where he did it. If termites made a mess, I can find and put back what they messed up. I feel exactly the same with my computing apparatus, and I highly resent efforts by others ( via DMCA like legal maneuvering ) to keep me ignorant of how my stuff works. It frustrates me to no end to have others make knowledge illegal, enforceable by police at gunpoint, only for the financial gain of blocking off alternative remedies I have for maintenance or customization needs.

    Having ANY software vendor locking me in to their "support" is like having the contractor who built my house locking me in for anything I want to do to maintain or modify my house.

    Not to say I would want to deprive him of his art of driving nails, but if he was too hard to get along with, or overprices himself, I strongly reserve what I feel is my right to pick up the hammer and saw and do it personally, if need be.

    Ignorance is going to be the end of us (US).

    • by DaMattster (977781) on Monday May 28, 2007 @05:14PM (#19302479)

      I largely agree with you. This is why I have decided to go on an open source only diet. Believe me, I am the richer for it. I haven't run Windows since the waning days of Windows 2000 Professional. I have found that FreeBSD and OpenBSD can satisfy almost every computing need that I have, whither it be a minute task or a more advanced routing solution. I like having control of my computing environment. Knowing how my computers and operating systems work have saved me from making purchases based on sales propaganda or FUD. Knowledge really is power. When I hear Microsoft's Get the Facts, I yawn in boredom and can't help wonder how many punters will buy into it.

      Really, it comes down to our educational system to help stop some of the ignorance. Colleges should mandate more than just basic computer use courses. There should be a tuple of classes covering basic computer use, basic networking, and basic security. Just like some Comp and Info Sci programs require taking business classes, Business programs should require Info sci classes. If management were wiser to computing, they might listen when their IT professionals make a serious recommendation.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by TehZorroness (1104427)

      Ignorance is going to be the end of us (US).

      The US is already spiraling to it's grave of idiocy. You have the moronic public in one hand, and the detached government with it's own agendas in the other. This is not going to happen, it has been happening for quite some time now, and is only getting worse.

      People care more about Paris Hilton (the f***ing sl**bag) then politics. Politics are by no means a bad thing, but when only corporate entities show interest, problems arise.

  • by not_hylas( ) (703994) on Monday May 28, 2007 @04:01PM (#19302009) Homepage Journal
    Richard Clarke, top counter-terrorism adviser to presidents of both parties interview.
    Countdown with Keith Olbermann in January '07.

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/16771741/ [msn.com]

    My Summary:

    http://politics.slashdot.org/comments.pl?cid=18061 138&sid=222938 [slashdot.org]

  • by aepervius (535155) on Monday May 28, 2007 @04:01PM (#19302013)
    I am pretty sure the following "news" could be read somewhen in China

    "'The US has established information warfare units to develop viruses to attack enemy computer systems and networks,' the annual PLA Defense departement report on USA's military warned. At the same, US armed forces are developing ways to protect its own systems from an enemy attack, it said, echoing similar warnings made in previous years."

    This leave me wondering with such a NON-news, what sort of propaganda is theUS trying to kick up. Are there commercial negociation starting soon with China ? Are they trying to put some pressure on China for a better rate ?
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by jd (1658)
      Possibly something drummed up by the GAO. Virtually every single Federal department has failed security audits year after year, with some of the military ones getting worse. It would not surprise me if someone came up with the idea of scaring the Feds into finally taking this seriously. (Same with corporate security. A few million credit cards stolen here or there don't seem to bother the online stores much, they still have lousy safeguards and probably retain data on a machine directly connected to the Int
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by readin (838620)
      I am pretty sure the following "news" could be read somewhen in China

      "'The US has established information warfare units to develop viruses to attack enemy computer systems and networks,' the annual PLA Defense departement report on USA's military warned. At the same, US armed forces are developing ways to protect its own systems from an enemy attack, it said, echoing similar warnings made in previous years."


      On the other hand, you wouldn't find this "The main focus of USA's military modernization effo
      • by SLi (132609)
        While I support independence for Taiwan, you do realize what happened the last time Texas & friends tried to gain independence, right? And IIRC Texas had the right to secede explicitly written in their agreement to join the Union. There are no such agreements between China and Taiwan.

        See, there are more ways to view things than the Official Democratic US View(tm)?
    • by clragon (923326)

      "'The US has established information warfare units to develop viruses to attack enemy computer systems and networks,' the annual PLA Defense departement report on USA's military warned. At the same, US armed forces are developing ways to protect its own systems from an enemy attack, it said, echoing similar warnings made in previous years." This leave me wondering with such a NON-news, what sort of propaganda is theUS trying to kick up. Are there commercial negociation starting soon with China ? Are they t

  • Interesting (Score:3, Informative)

    by Howitzer86 (964585) on Monday May 28, 2007 @04:16PM (#19302117)
    It's interesting to hear repeatedly that they are making so much effort in this area. The obvious target is the United States, though they could effectively attack our allies as well.

    Coupled with anti-satellite weapons and a developing blue water navy - One could say they are preparing for conquest.

    The rewards are enormous. China could completely destroy our networks and economy in a single day with a well coordinated strike.

    That's not enough time to move our forces and fight back.

    What is DOD doing? Spying on their citizens and making life a living hell for Iraqis.
    • by jpop32 (596022)
      One could say they are preparing for conquest.

      From Wikipedia: American defense expenditures in 2005 were estimated to be greater than the next 14 largest national military budgets combined.

      So, you were saying, someone is preparing for conquest?
    • It's interesting to hear repeatedly that they are making so much effort in this area. The obvious target is the United States, though they could effectively attack our allies as well.

      That, and neutrals, and for that matter your enemies. The world doesn't revolve entirely around the US, you know.

      Consider: Company A in country M is trying to sell products to company B in country N. Company C in China would like some of that business. So: the Chinese dig out some of their black-magic tools and pwnz0r some

    • by AlHunt (982887)
      >The rewards are enormous. China could completely destroy our networks and economy in a single day with a well coordinated strike.

      To what end? Conquest of what? China destroying our (US) economy would be shooting themselves in the foot with a bazooka. "We" buy an enormous amount of Chinese goods.

      Can you imagine the "flight 93" reaction of this country if an invading army set foot on our shores?

      I don't discount that they might do things to damage the US, and I suggest everyone think about how you'll ge
  • Attacking the country that ultimately controls your economy is not a wise move. Shame on the man that has 50K in debt to the bank. Shame on the bank for allowing multi-hundred billions in debt.
  • by unlametheweak (1102159) on Monday May 28, 2007 @04:41PM (#19302265)
    There is an easy solution to cyberwarfare. Just don't keep important parts of your information infrastructure connected to the Internet; and always have offline backups. If people (especially businesses and government) rely too heavily on one medium (like the Internet) then it will become an obvious target. If worse came to worse, we could always just pull the plug. If your main line of business is related to the Internet, then you need to think of contingencies, like at the very least having VPNs for your customers/clients to use.

    If people, businesses, governments, or armies cannot function without the Internet, then things have gone to far. I do however believe that the cyberwarefare concept is more hyperbole than a real threat. If I couldn't read Slashdot because of some Chinese government DoS attack, it would be sad for me, but it would not be the end of the world. And remember: the Internet as it is was designed for redundancy and routing around communication problems.
  • What makes this article newsworthy? TFA doesn't report anything new or out of the ordinary. Any army in the world would recruit hackers and use their abilities. In fact TFA starts with "The People's Liberation Army (PLA) continues to build cyberwarfare units..." - Yes, well, in other news: "A sack of rice just tipped over in Zhejiang province, China. No casualties have been confirmed yet. Authorities advise citizens to remain calm..."

    Is this article just general fear mongering or is someone setting up a
  • im not scared (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward
    I'm not scared, bring it on! Hope they're ready to find the 3rd (remote) exploit in OpenBSD in 10 years...
  • Crying Wolf (Score:3, Insightful)

    by bitspotter (455598) on Monday May 28, 2007 @04:53PM (#19302317) Journal
    If only our government hasn't had it's reputation soiled by crying wolf all the time, perhaps we could trust it when it tries to warn us about national security threats.
  • by Matz0r (324905) on Monday May 28, 2007 @05:34PM (#19302631)
    # iptables -I INPUT -s 60.0.0.0/8 -j DROP
  • Red Flag Linux (Score:5, Insightful)

    by BroadbandBradley (237267) on Monday May 28, 2007 @05:54PM (#19302759) Homepage
    of course this makes sense now, get the Microsoft windows source code, encourage your citizens to use Red Flag Linux instead, gain a competitive edge when cyber-warefare erupts.
  • by Anonymous Coward
    Let's see. I can work for Google or Yahoo or Microsoft and get free sushi and massages, or I can go to work for the DoD, where my skills are vitally needed, and for the privilege I can receive two years of hassle over my $50 unpaid phone bill from ten years ago and told to pee in a cup.
  • Holy Crap! (Score:3, Funny)

    by glwtta (532858) on Monday May 28, 2007 @07:18PM (#19303273) Homepage
    Please tell me they don't have anything at Kuang Grade, Mark Eleven yet - we are so fucked if they do.
  • by SleepyHappyDoc (813919) on Monday May 28, 2007 @10:24PM (#19304427)
    ...then it should be subject to the rules of war. If one nation attacking the network infrastructure of another nation were considered to violate the rules of war, they would think twice. It would hardly be worth it for China to DDoS a few connections if it meant we would start executing their PoW's.

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